Fisker EMotion On Track For CES Debut, Will Feature 5 LiDAR Sensors

3 weeks ago by Steven Loveday 18

Fisker EMotion

Fisker EMotion

The Fisker EMotion is officially on the bill for January’s CES, complete with solid-state LiDAR.

Fisker has partnered up with Quanergy for its debut at the infamous Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. The company will put five of its S3 solid-state LiDAR sensors into the upcoming 145 kWh/400+ mile EMotion. Quanergy is working with Fisker to fully integrate its sensors into the EMotion. The company is the industry leader when it comes to all key areas, including power, efficiency, price, size, weight, and reliability.

Editor’s Note:  Yes, InsideEVs will be live at the show in Las Vegas…now to let Henrik let us take his car for a spin!

Fisker EMotion Teaser

Fisker EMotion – Note the center chrome area where the LiDAR will be fitted

In simple terms, LiDAR uses a laser and a sensor that move in order to “see” more area in a 3D format. According to Green Car Congress:

Mechanical LiDAR units use a laser and sensor that are physically moved around to build up their view of 3D space (e.g., spinning in a circle). Quanergy’s solid-state LiDAR uses an optical phased array as a transmitter, which can steer pulses of light by shifting the phase of a laser pulse as it is projected through the array.

Quanergy’s S3 unit generates half a million data points per second. Lasers emit collimated light pulses in a 120° arc. Light receivers detect the reflected light pulses. Signal processors calculate the Time-of-Flight (TOF) of each light pulse. With the ability to scan in every direction, the unit creates a live 3D view around a vehicle to detect, classify, and track objects in the scene.

The Fisker EMotion will be fitted with the LiDAR system in the center chrome piece (as shown in the photo on the right).

The automaker plans to make this standard with all of its upcoming vehicles. The LiDAR feature will be available on the EMotion as part of an optional upgrade. The vehicle’s base price is currently set at $129,900.

Source: Green Car Congress

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18 responses to "Fisker EMotion On Track For CES Debut, Will Feature 5 LiDAR Sensors"

  1. jelloslug says:

    Too bad about the front end…

  2. So, what’s missing? This headline says 5, but they only described one???

  3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    “Lasers emit collimated light pulses in a 120° arc. Light receivers detect the reflected light pulses.”

    If so, then why does the car need 5 LIDAR arrays? Three would be sufficient to cover the full 360° circle.

    This is a complete and total guess, but I’m guessing the car uses three arrays to cover the full circle, but also has more narrowly focused arrays pointed straight ahead and straight back, for longer distance scanning ahead and behind on the road.

    * * * * *

    HEY, ARE YOU LISTENING TESLA?

    If Fisker can use solid-state LIDAR arrays for 360° active scanning, then so can you. Get with the program!

    1. Vexar says:

      I’m a fan of the cameras. It is all we use. Besides, 1 LIDAR isn’t cheap. 5 makes this a very expensive way to travel.

      1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        Tesla is trying to cheap out by using only passive scanning with cameras for the side and rear views, camera images plus optical object recognition software, which has long been known to be unreliable. That has already resulted in one fatality, where Tesla said Autopilot “confused the side of a semi trailer painted white with the brightly lit sky”.

        Active scanning with radar and/or LIDAR will save lives. That’s fact, not mere opinion. This is one area where nobody should be trying to save money by relying only on cameras.

        I understand that those spinning LIDAR scanners used by Waymo and Lyft and others developing their own self-driving cars would be too expensive for mass production cars, but here Fisker is talking about solid state LIDAR scanners. Assuming those are new and expensive right now, just like all solid state electronics, the price will drop radically over the next several years. And if they’re not that expensive now, then Tesla has even less of an excuse to avoid using them.

        1. Birger says:

          ” That has already resulted in one fatality, where Tesla said Autopilot “confused the side of a semi trailer painted white with the brightly lit sky”.”
          That is not at all correct. The driver caused the crash. The Tesla system was and is not in a state where it is capable of autonomous driving. Its an added layer of safety.

          1. Four Electrics says:

            If the driver had not been using Autopilot, they would still be alive today. The rest is semantics–dangerous semantics, as the human brain cannot physiologically, pay attention all the time to something which, 99% of the time, it knows it doesn’t need to.

            Note that the per-mile fatality rate of non-Autopilot Teslas is much lower than on Autopilot Teslas, so all Tesla drivers would be safer if Autopilot did not exist.

        2. Four Electrics says:

          Totally agree with PP here. Cameras can be made to work, but if you want to be *safer* than with a human driver, you need technology beyond what humans have (cameras).

    2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      “I’m guessing the car uses three arrays to cover the full circle, but also has more narrowly focused arrays pointed straight ahead and straight back…”

      On second thought, looking at the front of the car and the openings there which presumably are for the laser scanning beams, it seems more likely one pointed in each of the cardinal directions (so that each scanner only needs to cover 90°, not 120°) plus the front center one, presumably for more narrowly focused, longer distance forward scanning.

    3. Mo says:

      You cannot have LIDAR on a production car, period. It’s way too expensive. Maybe on 200k+ cars, Fisker is just talking up hype as usual.

      1. What are you calling a Production Car? A Pony?

      2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        Perhaps they’re not as expensive as you think, Mo.

        A relevant quote (link below):

        Other LiDAR companies like Innoviz, the Israel startup, is already on its way to marketing a $100 solid-state sensor by 2018.

        Obviously that’s just a target price, but if they can be delivered at that price, then 5 arrays would be only $500. And if they’re not $100 in 2018, competition will soon drive the price down that far, and likely even lower within a couple of years.

        https://driverless.wonderhowto.com/news/velodyne-joins-cheap-solid-state-lidar-game-with-velarray-sensor-0177208/

      3. floydboy says:

        Not if the car is very, very expensive.

  4. Nick says:

    Neat! I wonder if this new sensor will be more effective in rain and dust vs traditional LIDAR sensors?

  5. WARREN says:

    Camera based is very unreliable when driving into direct sunlight, morning fog/dew conditions, and non moving objects. Hope LIDAR doesn’t drive my Radar/Laser detector crazy.

    1. Birger says:

      “Camera based is very unreliable when driving into direct sunlight, morning fog/dew conditions, ”

      Just like our eyes are 😉

      1. Djoni says:

        Agree!
        Human eye have been the sole sensor for driving car and all thing moving.
        Not that they are perfect, far from it, but camera can have much better resolution than a human eye on a much larger radiation spectrum.

        Some snake see infra red and the northern caribou is able to see ultraviolet, and prey bird can see a mouse in bush from thousand feet away.

        So I won’t scrap camera so fast.

  6. Samwise says:

    I wonder where they are hiding the super computer to process all these data points into something meaninful a car can use at 60 mph.

    Maybe that’s what is hiding in that ugly ass nose.

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