EVgo To Develop A Statewide Charging Network In Virginia

AUG 19 2018 BY MARK KANE 18

The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) selected EVgo to grant a contract to develop a statewide public fast-charging network.

Virginia decided to use $14 million in funds from its share of the Volkswagen mitigation settlement (a maximum of 15% out of $93.6 million from the settlement can be spent on charging infrastructure).

The press release doesn’t say how many charging stations are to be built, but it should be enough to noticeably improve the situation there.

EVgo operates more than 1,000 fast chargers in 34 states. With more than 75,000 customers company provided more than 1 million charging sessions in 2017.

EVgo fast charging station

“This contract is awarded from funding that the Commonwealth was allocated through the Volkswagen mitigation settlement, and it will serve as a forward looking program that will help to meet driver needs as electric vehicle adoption rates continue to increase.

Maximizing the state’s investment, EVgo will develop a statewide charging network that prioritizes DC fast chargers to adapt to the rapidly evolving technology of the electric vehicle market. The network will prioritize some of the most heavily traveled corridors in the Commonwealth and will complement existing charging stations and other large-scale deployments of charging infrastructure underway.”

“DEQ issued a request for proposals last September to establish a statewide EV charging network as part of the Volkswagen emissions testing settlement. DEQ is the designated lead agency acting on the state’s behalf as beneficiary to implement Virginia’s allocation of $93.6 million from the settlement. The settlement allows states to use a maximum of 15 percent of their total allocation for electric vehicle charging infrastructure, which represents approximately $14 million.”

“Based out of Los Angeles, EVgo is the nation’s largest owner and operator of public EV DC fast-charging stations with more than 1,000 stations in 34 states across the United States, including stations in Virginia. DC fast charging can deliver a range of 60 to 80 miles for every 20 minutes of charging.

EVgo is using two Virginia-based contractors to help develop the electric vehicle charging network. The network will be developed over three (3) one (1)-year investment cycles. EVgo will also open a service center in Richmond that will allow for rapid deployment and maintenance support of Virginia’s statewide charging network and encourage local job growth.”

“Virginia is also filing today the Beneficiary Mitigation Plan with the Volkswagen trustee, which contains all eligible mitigation actions or project categories that the Commonwealth of Virginia plans to fund with the $93.6 million, including the $14 million electric vehicle charging network.”

EVgo charging network

Governor Ralph Northam said:

“Virginia is taking a leading role to develop and deliver a statewide electric vehicle charging network that is driver-focused, user-friendly, and promotes electric vehicle usage. Through this partnership with EVgo, Virginia will accelerate electric vehicle adoption, generate more private investment in electric vehicle technology, and help provide citizens in the Commonwealth with cleaner air.”

Secretary of Natural Resources Matt Strickler said:

“Especially given the Trump Administration’s proposal to roll back vehicle fuel economy standards, we cannot build out our electric vehicle support system soon enough. Accelerating the adoption of electric vehicles is a critical step to Virginia’s efforts to fight climate change by doing our part to curb pollution.”

EVgo CEO Cathy Zoi said:

“EVgo is thrilled to win a competitive bid to dramatically expand the electric vehicle charging network in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Thanks to Governor Northam’s leadership, Virginia is already a clean energy leader, and EVgo is excited to invest our private capital alongside the nation’s first deployment of Appendix D Volkswagen settlement funding.”

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18 Comments on "EVgo To Develop A Statewide Charging Network In Virginia"

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CDAVIS

From article: “…Virginia is also filing today the Beneficiary Mitigation Plan with the Volkswagen trustee, which contains all eligible mitigation actions or project categories that the Commonwealth of Virginia plans to fund with the $93.6 million, including the $14 million electric vehicle charging network…”
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Virginia is using only $14M of the $93M towards a charging network??? … am I reading that right? You would think the majority of the available funds would go toward a state-wide fast charge network if the object is to promote adoption of EVs within the state.

ga2500ev

You passed the crucial item of the statutory limitation of the amount funds from that part of the settlement that can be allocated for charging stations. To quote ” The settlement allows states to use a maximum of 15 percent of their total allocation for electric vehicle charging infrastructure, which represents approximately $14 million.”

Note that this part of the settlement is separate from the $1.2 billion allocated to the country for infrastructure support that being managed by Electrify America. You can find a zoomable map of planned stations so you can get an idea of where they are going to be deployed here: https(url connector)batchgeo(dot)com/map/1f3cd122cf915d73c0eb9e90a814cb2e . I’ve seen reports that the one listed as “coming soon” near Roanoke on I-81 is in fact already open.

So each state gets to decide how to deploy the additional money. Georgia for example plans on securing an electric bus system in support of the Atlanta Airport with their funds. In addition the First Electrify America 10 station charger will be opening in the NW suburb of Atlanta, Kennesaw GA, in a very short timeframe.

ga2500ev

Brandon

The I-81 fast charger you mentioned was actually Electrify America’s second location to open, and did so almost 3 months ago. This can be seen on the PlugShare listing.

CDAVIS

@ga2500ev said: “…The settlement allows states to use a maximum of 15 percent of their total allocation for electric vehicle charging infrastructure, which represents approximately $14 million…”
————

Thanks pointing that out. I should have more clearly said:

You would think that the state allocated funds would not have a 15% of allocated funds limit towards charging infrastructure if the object of the state funds is to promote adoption of EVs within the state.

7O% or more of the total settlement funds (both national and by state) should have been allocated towards a fast charge network.

#1 challange for EV adoption:

Access to a reliable and convenient fast charge network for those occasional long distance trips.

antrik

#1 challenge? That sounds like a bold claim.

Big Solar

This is great but I hope they have a different level 2 pricing structure than the one here. Its 10 bucks for a charge no matter how long you’re plugged in.

Ziv

EVgo was here for a while in Arlington. But it got totally blocked for normal BEV drivers by BEV taxi drivers monopolizing it. I was told but didnn’t see that the taxi drivers there were “recommending” that non-taxi drivers find nearby chargers and use those. Are all EVgo stations part of the “no charge to charge” program? If so, these new chargers won’t be available to normal BEV drivers in most situations.
ChargePoint is better. Heck, even Blink is better than EVgo.

Well, the situation here in Arlington, Texas is totally the opposite. Blink stations never work and/or they are ICEd. Chargepoint is better, and EVGo is the most reliable we have around here.

Dimitrij

I have never seen a Charge Point DCFC in VA; I think it’s only Greenlots and EVgo. Blink and Charge Point do have L2’s, though.

WARREN

Yes here in Socal, there are Lyft drivers in slow charging Bolts tying up the chargers for hours.

Ziv

At least the Bolt can charge at up to 45 kW charge rate up to 55% of capacity, which isn’t bad. I hope GM lets their engineering team improve that in the near future though. Pushing the taper point up to 75% would be a relatively easy fix, and it wouldn’t cost much while making charging much faster. Bumping the max rate up would be nice, but might take more work and expense.
The thing that makes me wonder about the sanity of the Leaf taxi drivers is that they can charge those Leafs to 80% in no time, but they seem to stay until they have completely topped off the pack. Is their time worth nothing?

Warren

I hope they put one in Abingdon, so you can actually get to Dandridge, Tennessee on I-81.

ga2500ev

See my other reply above for a link to a zoomable map from Electrify America ultra fast charging stations. You can see all the proposed stations that Electrify America plans to deploy along I-81. This first cycle is supposed to have all these stations starting construction before July 1, 2019.

ga2500ev

I’m just one state below VA in NC. I wish EVgo would install DCFC along the interstate corridors. All their currrent sites are in cities.

BoltUp

EVgo making charging as expensive as gas

Brandon

Their rates vary from state to state, but $0.20 per minute is about the average. If you’re in a Bolt EV and getting a decently high kW rate from the fast charger compared to most LEAF’s out there, then you’re talking around lower $0.30 per kWh rates, which does translate to $3.00 or so per gallon equivalent cost. Believe it or not, this is very much in line with DCFC providers here in the US, and quite a bit better than most providers worldwide. I’ve done research on this.
Also, we all do need to keep two facts in mind when talking about DCFC rates: it’s a convenience service, so expect prices accordingly, AND on average it’s only around 5% of total miles charged per year in an EV.

antrik

I find it funny to see the term “network” applied to something that right now looks more like a bunch of disconnected clusters…

Vinny

EVgo may be pricy but from what I have seen in NC they maintain their chargers. Greenlots on the other hand, doesn’ t. Just look on PlugShare at all of the DCFC systems in Richmond, VA. Then try to find one that works!