Emissions-Free Tesla Model S Road Trip In China – Video

MAY 16 2016 BY ELECTRICCARSTV 24

Perhaps A Bit Of A Stretch, But Electric Cars Would Make For A Cleaner Planet

Perhaps A Bit Of A Stretch, But Electric Cars Would Make For A Cleaner Planet

Over the weekend, Tesla Motors released a video showcasing a Model S road trip in China.

Video description:

“20 Chinese Model S owners set off on a road trip to explore East China driving through historic towns and picturesque tea fields making stops at charging stations along the way.”

The focus of the video is on how electric cars are cleaner than ICE and how by driving electric, you get actual freedom in China. The video uses the example of China’s restricted-driving laws, which limit either where an ICE car can drive or on which days ICE cars can be driven.

By going electric, driver typically bypass these laws, thus gaining freedom to drive as they choose.

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24 Comments on "Emissions-Free Tesla Model S Road Trip In China – Video"

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Speculawyer

Bioweapons defense mode will come in handy there.

Jychevyvolt

How can it be emission free when their grid is dirty?

ModernMarvelFan

Don’t tell Tesla fans that.

That is especially the case in China where the emission is similar to a 30 mpg car.

Prius would have been cleaner in China based on the Chinese dirty grid.

Michael Will

Where does the electricity come from that is used to refine the gas ? Elon estimated about 5kWh per gallon of gas – by simply not making and distributing that you can drive like 20 miles already

ModernMarvelFan

“Where does the electricity come from that is used to refine the gas ? Elon estimated about 5kWh per gallon of gas – by simply not making and distributing that you can drive like 20 miles already”

Most of that electricity are generated onsite. The number is actually much lower tan 5kWh. It is more like 2kWh per gallon.

EVs transmission loses about 7%, EVSE or chargers cost another 10-15% according to EPA. So, that is 16.3% right there is loss.

16.3% on a 90kWh battery is 14.67kWh which is way more than 20 miles of range.

Transportation of gasoline will take some energy but there is very little gasoline loss in the process to the tank of the Prius.

Regardless of how each process has their own loss. The facts remains that due to the dirty Chinese power plants, driving EVs in China today isn’t cleaner than a high MPG hybrid.

When that grid gets cleaner, so will the EVs. Until then, it isn’t cleaner at all. And China isn’t everywhere. So in other countries with low coal based generations, EVs will be cleaner. However, we are talking about Tesla in China here.

sveno

I have to disagree here. Your points are valid but the “well to wheel” calculations don’t add up to what you propose. Yes, using a coal power plant with an inefficient grid does not yield in a bright mpg number but I have not seen it to be worse than even compared to a smaller sized hybrid.

On another point – a huge portion of Model S/X owners are also house owners who have solar panels.

In any case – when we look at the lifecycle of a car, there are significant chance that the well to wheel MPGe number will only go up whereas with an ICE car it will only go down due to wear and tear.

ModernMarvelFan

“I have to disagree here. Your points are valid but the “well to wheel” calculations don’t add up to what you propose. Yes, using a coal power plant with an inefficient grid does not yield in a bright mpg number but I have not seen it to be worse than even compared to a smaller sized hybrid.”

Did you check out the UCS study on US grid emission?

The dirtiest state in the US grid with heavy coal only yields a mpg equivalent of 34 MPG…

So, yes, higher mpg hybrids are better than 34 mpg. That is UCS studies.

Pete

As we learned in the recent article here PM10 Emissions:
•A positive relationship exists between vehicle weight and non-exhaust emissions.
•Electric vehicles are 24% heavier than their conventional counterparts.
•Electric vehicle PM emissions are comparable to those of conventional vehicles.
•Non-exhaust sources account for 90% of PM10 and 85% of PM2.5 from traffic.
•Future policy should focus on reducing vehicle weight.

So Tesla is one dirty EV manufacturer. Heavy cars, more PM10 emissions, emissions for manufacturing more battery, more space need for transport.
And all Tesla shiped to Europe comes with 2000 liters per vehicle heavy oil, yummy :-).

ModernMarvelFan

Sorry to burst one of the owner’s bubble. He said that if everyone drives a Tesla in China, the blue sky will return in China…

Well, unless they are cleaning up their power plants, reduce coal usage and clean up all the industrial emission, Tesla will not bring back the blue sky “alone”.

Yes, it will make a big difference inside the city. But it is ONLY PART OF THE SOLUTION!

Anon

Would you rather the Chinese continue to burn hydrocarbon based fuels inefficiently in there cars? I don’t get what your negativity is in regards this ad, other than it’s by Tesla. It’s on target and accurate. As you know, burning coal for electricity and running an EV is _STILL_ cleaner than using gasoline for mobility.

China’s grid continues to evolve, and they’ve planned for a 143 GW Solar Expansion target by 2020. Maybe encouraging BEVs– even if they’re Tesla’s, might be a more productive use of your time?

ModernMarvelFan
“Would you rather the Chinese continue to burn hydrocarbon based fuels inefficiently in there cars? I don’t get what your negativity is in regards this ad, other than it’s by Tesla. ” No, the interview itself shows some of the so called “benefit” is that PEVs such as Tesla aren’t restricted by local government. It is sort of like HOV sticker in California. The owners feel “entitled” to get around government restriction. “It’s on target and accurate. As you know, burning coal for electricity and running an EV is _STILL_ cleaner than using gasoline for mobility.” Not back up by facts. With the current Chinese grid of using 77%+ in coal, the emission of EVs are similar to a car in the low 30s mpg. So, a hybrid (non plug in) like Prius is actually indeed have better emission than any EVs based on Chinese dirty coal grid. “China’s grid continues to evolve, and they’ve planned for a 143 GW Solar Expansion target by 2020. Maybe encouraging BEVs– even if they’re Tesla’s, might be a more productive use of your time?” Yes, Chinese renewable energy growth is among the leaders of the world. Solar and Wind are both near if… Read more »
Micke Larsson

2015 numbers are 73% of chinese electricity coming from fossil fuels. Coal stands for 69% of the total electricity generated.

China are also one of the most aggressive reducers of coal and installers of hydro, other renewables and nuclear so expect those numbers to drop fast.
They are also very aggressively closing down coal plants in or near big cities.

My point? Even if someone could factually correct claim that buying a Prius hybrid today could be cleaner than a Tesla (or another EV) there is no way someone could argue that for the local environment (e.g. “seeing the blue sky”) nor for the lifetime of the car.

Other than that I totally agree on the “there is lots more work to do” than just EVs.

ModernMarvelFan

“My point? Even if someone could factually correct claim that buying a Prius hybrid today could be cleaner than a Tesla (or another EV) there is no way someone could argue that for the local environment (e.g. “seeing the blue sky”) nor for the lifetime of the car.”

I agree with your general idea.

However, I have my doubts on whether China can clean up quickly enough to offset those emission in 1 generation of cars. Maybe the next generation.

As far as local environment goes, Chinese power plants are notorious for its emission especially with brown coals which are far worse than automotive emissions. They often blank the cities downstream so, even if EVs are covered in the cities, the nearby industrial plants and power plants will cause major air pollution down stream.

Beijing only got cleaned up for short period of times during major international events due to shutting down nearby power plants and industries rather than just limit cars inside the city…

Robert Weekley
It seems to me that China’s Coal Pollution problem is even more an issue of Traditional Free Coal Burning stoves, that number still in the Hundred of Thousands, to which they are pushing hard to move to Electric Stoves where the grid is, and I believe they are also pushing for Natural Gas Stoves to replace Coal burning for cooking, as well. So, even on insideEV’s.com, I hear the message that Natural Gas is Cleaner than Coal, and Natural Gas fired Generation is cleaner than Coal Generation of Electricity, and – in China, when they decide a direction to go, as in cleaning up their grid, they will put a much larger effort to that, than many other countries. Their issue is largely trying to push 150 years of progress into 50 years, which is why they grew so many Coal Fired Generation plants so fast. Now that they gave created so many such plants, they also have been greatly instrumental in driving down the cost of Solar PV, more than USA, hence Solyndra’s excuse for failure, as the price fell so fast on their watch, that they could not adjust their business model fast enough to compete, and went… Read more »
Robert Weekley
10 States That Burn The Most Coal -http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/states-burn-the-most-coal_us_56097dbae4b0af3706dd2cf2 “Burning coal produces a variety of unhealthy particulates and roughly twice as much carbon dioxide as natural gas. Some states generate tremendous amounts of energy from coal and use coal as a main power source. In West Virginia, all but 4.5% of the state’s electricity comes from fuel. 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the 10 states burning the most coal in the country.”: http://247wallst.com/special-report/2015/09/14/10-states-burning-the-most-coal/ Continuing from the Huffington Post story: “Last year, 27.4% of the nation’s electricity came from natural gas-burning power plants, compared to 17.1% in 2001. In addition, the steadily increased use of solar, wind, and other alternative energy sources, has meant a decline in coal usage. In 2004, the country generated nearly 2 million gigawatt-hours (GWh) from coal. Last year, the country generated 1.58 million GWh from the fossil fuel. This shift is true of some of the largest coal-burning states as well. In Pennsylvania, for example, the share of electricity generation from coal out of total production fell by 20 percentage points from 2001 to 2014. Natural gas, meanwhile, jumped from just 1.5% of total production to 23.7% over the same period.” The Top 10: 10. Florida > 2014… Read more »
Thomassen

China is leader in renewable energy at the moment, ofcourse they have dirty coal plants but most countries have.

Micke Larsson

Nope. Most countries are actually free from coal plants.

And out of the countries with coal plants 10 of them account for closer to 90% of total coal for electricity generation.

I’m sure you can guess the 10 countries, all of them infamous for their coal use and massive polluters.

Robert Weekley
Well, I didn’t seacr for ‘most’, only for top 10: What Are The Top 10 Coal-Burning Countries on the Planet? Who’s #1? http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/what-are-the-top-10-coal-burning-countries-on-the-planet-whos-1.html “When it comes to global warming and air pollution, coal is enemy #1. We were curious to know which countries burned the most, so we compiled a list of the top 10 coal-burning countries in the world based on the latest statistics from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). We chose not to use per capita numbers because the atmosphere doesn’t care about that; in the end, all that matters is absolutely numbers.” #10 South-Korea 112,843 thousand short tons, #9 Poland 149,333 thousand short tons, #8 Australia 160,515 thousand short tons, #7 South Africa: 193,654 thousand short tons, #6 Japan: 203,979 thousand short tons, #5 Russia: 269,684 thousand short tons, #4 Germany: 269,892 thousand short tons, #3 India: 637,522 thousand short tons, #2 USA: 1,121,714 thousand short tons, #1 China: 2,829,515 thousand short tons “According to the U.S. Department of Energy: Carbon dioxide (CO2) forms during coal combustion when one atom of carbon (C) unites with two atoms of oxygen (O) from the air. Because the atomic weight of carbon is 12 and that of oxygen is… Read more »
Robert Weekley
Sorry, I forgot to date the link in the above story: it was published April 26, 2010! A more recent link of a similar subject: “The world’s biggest coal consumers – 26 August 2014” – http://www.mining-technology.com/features/featurethe-worlds-biggest-coal-consumers-4353695/ “The top ten coal consuming countries account for over 85% of the world’s total coal consumption, with China alone consuming as much as rest of the world together. Mining-technology.com profiles the ten biggest coal consumers based on latest coal consumption and production data.” From the biggest users, to the smallest, in the top 10 – from this source: China #1, China’s coal consumption grew by four percent to 2.75 billion tonnes in 2013 accounting for over half of the world’s total coal consumption in the year. China is also by far the biggest coal producer accounting for about 47.4% of the world’s coal output in 2013. Coal accounts for over 65% of total energy consumption in the country. China, the most populous and the biggest energy consuming country, is also the world’s biggest coal importer followed by Japan and India. United States of America #2, The US, a net exporter of coal, consumed 651 million tonnes of coal in 2013 accounting for about 12%… Read more »
Robert Weekley
Did a quick search- so some links on top countries using Solar: Top 10 Countries Using Solar Power By Matthew Wheeland – September 15, 2014 http://pureenergies.com/us/blog/top-10-countries-using-solar-power/ “We’re keep the 2009 numbers in parentheses as a reference point of just how quickly the world is switching to affordable, clean solar energy. One telling point: The solar industry is growing so rapidly that we’ve had to update our units of measurement from megawatts (MW) to gigawatts (GW).” “Below are the top 10 countries using solar power in the world according to installed photovoltaic solar (PV) energy capacity.” These following points are all directly from the above linked article. 1. Germany: 35.5 GW (2010: 9.8 GW — 1st place) In 2010, Germany was clearly the world leader, and has only continued the trend. 2. China: 18.3 GW (2010: .305 GW — 8th Place) Everything that China does, it does big. As the world’s most populous nation, and the one with the biggest carbon footprint, it’s great news that China has made such a major commitment to solar power. Since our 2009 research, China has grown its solar capacity by an astounding 6,000 percent — from less than one-third of a gigawatt of capacity… Read more »
Robert Weekley

Closer to home, Top 10 Solar States
Article – http://www.seia.org/research-resources/top-10-solar-states

Graphic – “This infographic ranks the Top 10 Solar States based on cumulative solar capacity installed (as of March 2016). It also includes the number of megawatts installed per state and number of houses powered per megawatt of solar added. We also show the rankings “remixed” based on number of solar jobs as of January 2016, solar capacity installed in 2015, solar capacity per capita, and percentage of new electricity generation from solar.”:

http://www.seia.org/sites/default/files/Top%2010%20Solar%20States_2015_DIGITAL-01-fixed.png

Still some States not listed, like Florida, that could do better!

twiiter quote: “.@RhoneResch: Right now, there are 27 GW of #solar installed in US. Within the next 5 years, we will nearly triple that”

Robert Weekley
Jay Cole, I wonder if you could edit the graphic link above to fit a width x height spec in the URL, or at least a width parameter, so it will display without cropping on the right hand side?? Further info found on Solar: “Top Solar Power Countries Per Capita & Per GDP (CleanTechnica Exclusive)” http://cleantechnica.com/2013/06/26/solar-power-by-country-solar-rankings-by-country/ “It’s great that giant countries like the US and China are investing in solar, but how do their investments really compare when we compare to country populations and GDP? That’s the important question — that is, if we want to identify who is really leading the world with aggressive solar power policies and incentives.” *See linked article for graphed and listed numbers! Lots of comparisons!* “Initial Thoughts 1. Germany is still the clear solar power leader per capita (total solar power capacity). 2. Italy, Belgium, and the Czech Republic are still clearly #2, #3, and #4 in that category. 3. Solar power country leaders per capita are almost entirely European countries. The only others in the top 20 are Australia (#8), Japan (#14), Israel (#17), US (#20). 4. Per GDP, however, Germany falls to #3, as Bulgaria and the Czech Republic take #1 and… Read more »
Jay Cole

Hey Robert,

Unfortunately it is a hard cap at 775 pcx wide. The system actually won’t allow pictures larger than that (it auto-moderates/leaves them as links), but we still see the whole pic at our end for potnential “un-moderation”. In this case, ‘most’ of the pic was visible, so I overrode the system to still show what it could (and left the link in for those who wanted to see the whole thing).

The only other option is to re-size it ourselves and then serve it (or you do the same and re-link)…but then we get into having to check for copyright, etc for us to do that (big pain)

/suckiness explained, lol

Four Electrics

That Tesla is one of the only emissions-free objects in all of China. A collector’s item!