Tesla Model 3 Emergency Response Guide: Video

JAN 21 2019 BY STEVEN LOVEDAY 1

Learn all about vehicle rescue and extrication related to the Tesla Model 3

We’ve shared a handful of EV and PHEV emergency response guides in the past. This is a very important topic, especially related to electrified vehicles. With any new technology comes new ways of dealing with it and keeping people safe. Due to high voltage components, firefighters can’t dismantle an electric vehicle in the same way as a gas car.

Advanced Extrication specialist Brock Archer and Reno Fire Department Captain Jim Bolton team up to present this valuable information. The video takes place at a fire station near the Tesla manufacturing facility in Fremont, California. Archer explains that the Model 3 is much different from the S and X, at least electrically. As we’ve shared in the past, the Model 3’s structural components and mix of alloys are unique.

The video looks at high voltage components in the Model 3, their location, and how to safely interact with them. In addition, the video dives into Model 3 construction features. Moreover, we get to watch a full side removal and dash displacement in action.

With the massive amount of Model 3 sedans selling in the U.S. as of late, it’s critical for emergency responders to be able to correctly identify the car. It’s also important that they have access to videos like this and receive the appropriate training to assure the utmost safety.

Video Description via Brock Archer on YouTube:

Emergency Response to the Tesla Model 3

In this video Brock Archer (Advanced Extrication), Jim Bolton (Reno Fire) and the Fremont Fire Department discuss and demonstrate vehicle rescue and extrication at incidents involving the Tesla Model 3.

Categories: Tesla, Videos

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1 Comment on "Tesla Model 3 Emergency Response Guide: Video"

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It’s an interesting topic that people often don’t think about. When we started developing production cars we had a few guidelines that we followed and information we shared with the relevant authorities. They’re common sense things, like no High Voltage in the A, B or C pillars and clearly marked 12v cables that can be safely cut that will take out the High Voltage system.

I hope all other manufacturers are doing their due diligence too (I imagine they are).