Passenger Battery Electric Car Sales Fall by 37% In France In February

MAR 24 2014 BY MARK KANE 10

Live Shot Of The Renault Zoe Using The New Flexi Charger Cable - Now Standard On All Models

Live Shot Of The Renault Zoe Using The New Flexi Charger Cable – Now Standard On All Models

Last month, the French market for electric cars shrank significantly compared to the previous year, despite some new models being introduced.

411 total registrations of passenger EVs is about 37% less than in February 2013, when numbers were inflated by Renault ZOE deliveries to first customers.

Renault ZOE with 205 units sold in February 2014 moves back into first place after lose that position in January. Sales of Renault’s flagship are however over two times lower than a year ago. This weak showing moves the ZOE to #114 in model rank among all passenger cars and gives it only 0.1% market share.

Nissan LEAF is second with 94 new registrations in February 2014.

All of the other models are selling in low numbers. Peugeot iOn 26, Tesla Model S 20 (new record), BMW i3 19 (far from record of 49 in November 2013) and electric smart also 19.

The rest of the pack has 28 combined sales with 3 for VW e-up! and 3 for the Ford Focus Electric.

Electric Cars Registrations In France In February 2014 - Source: Avere-France

Electric Cars Registrations In France In February 2014 – Source: Avere-France

Electric LCV sales continue to fall from 352 last year to 295 this year (-17%). Renault Kangoo Z.E. stays in the lead with 173 registrations and 58% market share. Interesting is that Goupil G3 and G5 vehicles had relatively high sales of 48 and 34, respectively.

After the first two months of 2014, France has 1,292 new EVs on the roads – 820 cars and 470 LCVs.

Categories: Nissan, Renault, Sales

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10 Comments on "Passenger Battery Electric Car Sales Fall by 37% In France In February"

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Ex Norway EV sales in Europe are pretty much of a disaster.
That is in spite of high fuel prices, and in France and many other places sales incentives available on a similar scale to those in the US, but at point of sale and not as a tax rebate.

I don’t know what it will take to make EV sales in Europe a success, but they are certainly not a viable business at the moment.

What it will take? More awareness and education of the general public. And simply getting butts in seats.

A better battery doubling the range will make BEVs a success, let’s hope by 2020.

These guys who are selling now are not really after money, this is both a charge to be first to market and compliance.

Nothing to fret about.

I’ve explained at length in other posts why the electric vehicles sales have a rough start in my country, but just wait for a year or two and the picture will be totally different.

French people are extremely defiant of change, but when they are eventually convinced, and when the plus/minus ratio tilts just a bit more in favor of the actual French middle class (charging access mandatory on condo parking lots in 2015 for instance), we’ll see more like thousands figures per model per month.

Besides, with the new commercial offers plus the availability of the occasional charging cable for the ZOE, its numbers should soar dramatically in April.

+1

I am not surprised. I live near Bordeaux and it took me me more then 2 month to arrange a test drive in an Opel Ampera. One of the dealers eventually found a used car. They do not even try to sell EV’s/Hybrids to you.

I still stand by my call in a prior insideev thread where I said worldwide Plug-in Sales growth will only be 35% overall from 2013 numbers for the entire year. This is an example of a protracted growth period which will not lead to the rates many of us EV advocates really want to see. The one thing spurring growth is incentives (ie. Norway) and benefits (ie. HOV lane access) and very lop-sided fuel costs (ie. Quebec with $5+ fuel and .07/kWh or less hydro-supplied electric).

this is depressing, considering France has some of the cleanest base load electricity in the world.

I am a German, living in the US and we have a MiEV as a 2nd car. It makes sense here but most families in Germany have only 1 car. I myself would not get an EV with the current range restrictions, if I would be back in Germany. A Tesla is simply out of the question at the current price point.

C’mon France . . . buy those nuclear cars!