Electra Meccanica SOLO Hits The Highway – Video

7 months ago by Mark Kane 25

Electra Meccanica is promoting its three wheeler Solo electric vehicle with a new video, presenting the nifty EV’s highway driving capability.

Electra Meccanica SOLO

Earlier,ย CNET suggestedย that high-speed driving could be terrifying prospect, but according to the Canadian company it will be perfect:

“The SOLO from Electra Meccanica. An electric car perfect for highway and city driving. Reserve your SOLO at smallev.com”

Prices in U.S. to be $15,500.

Some other specs of interest:

  • up to 100 miles of range on 16.1 kWh battery
  • electric motor puts out 82 hp/128 Nm of torque
  • top speed of 82 mph (about 130 km/h)
  • single passenger
  • 0-100 km/h (0-62 mph) in under 8 seconds
  • 15โ€ aluminum alloy wheels
  • cargo space: 10.3 cu ft (285 liters) โ€“ equivalent to the Mercedes C300 coupe

Electra Meccanica SOLO

Electra Meccanica SOLO

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25 responses to "Electra Meccanica SOLO Hits The Highway – Video"

  1. SparkEV says:

    If this is qualified as a car and full $7.5K fed tax credit is available, price will be $8K! If CA consider it the same, it could be ask low as $4K! The big question is, will it qualify for all those subsidies?

    Another big question is DCFC. Will it or won’t it? Sure, people drive 19 miles (or 50 miles) a day, but there are times when you absolutely have to get somewhere further, and can’t drive home to get the gasser. DCFC is emotionally indispensable to have.

    1. wavelet says:

      I’m pretty sure it can’t be considered a car — AFAIK, it doesn’t have airbags, crumple zones etc., nor is it tested to US Federal safety standards; this means it’s probably homologated as a motorcycle, or, in some states, the new “autocycle” category.

      The latter category is new, and was pushed by Elio Motors for their (non-electric) 3-wheeler. It’s for enclosed 3-wheelers with safety belts that safety-wise are not considered cars, but because they are enclosed, do not require helmets. License-wise they require only standard drivers’ licenses. Once people start being involved in fatal accidents in them, look for lots of lawsuits because noone told them it’s not as safe as a car.

  2. wavelet says:

    Their website site is another one of those breezy detail-free feel-good ones.

    Still zero new info on it about regulatory issues: Will the Solo require a motorcycle license and/or helmet, and in which provinces/states? What type of insurance? This proved a pretty complex issue for other enclosed three-wheelers.

    They announced last Aug. that sales would start in Sept. which apparently didn’t happen. When are they starting actual sales?

    Good luck, because I suspect they’ll need it…

  3. EV4Life says:

    It’s not a car so no tax credits.
    Alternatively, you can get a 1 year old Spark EV, Fiat 500 or Leaf for less money and get a real car.

    1. WadeTyhon says:

      Yeah I see no reason for an individual to own a solo. All 3 of the EVs you mention can be found around $10k with fairly low mileage.

      I can maybe see these mini-EVs being used on a corporate or college campus or something similar. Like the rent able bicycles or Zip cars we had on my college campus.

  4. Tom says:

    I would settle for an i-miev with a better battery

    1. Leeper says:

      If we are making a wishlist add cruise control, stronger charger, and controllable torque taper. But yes, mostly battery. ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. DJ says:

    What!?!? No video with actual audio from inside while driving at highway speeds. Whodathunk!?

    1. Warren says:

      Here is Zero battery guy, Luke Workman, driving a modified Corbin Sparrow.

      You can see him getting the backend all loosey goosey, punching it on that back road.

      1. Warren says:

        When he says it is “weak”, you have to understand that this is a guy who beats Teslas…on his electric bicycle!

  6. Four Electrics says:

    This thing would be a death trap on the highway. Conservation of momentum dictates it.

    1. Funny! I have been hit by bigger vehicles, while driving a Pontac Firefly (Geo Metro/Suzuki Swift), and THEY sustained more damage than my car!

    2. Cars that are lighter, just move out of the way when hit, especially if they have less tire traction, relieving the force of resistance, which means less damage to them.

      Depending in specific materials this shell is made from (Woven Glass Cloth, or Tri-Axial Kevlar and or Carbin Fibre; plus, which Resins were used, and their Specific Yield Values), it could either just get scratched, bend, and pop back, or shatter, depending on impact loads, and resistance to move out of the way.

      In any case, some brave souls will be on the roafs, getting experience, and we will know better then.

    3. Warren says:

      Yes. So we agree that SUVs should be banned.

      1. Steven says:

        +1

  7. Peter says:

    Actually, I wonder if it can keep balance when this car turn big direction.

    1. EV4Life says:

      Reverse trikes like this can be amazing fun to drive.
      Two wheels at the front gives you great stability and steering authority while the single drive wheel at the back means that it will lose traction long before the front wheels, so it oversteers before it rolls over.
      Morgan do an EV in a similar mold although rather more expensive ๐Ÿ™‚

  8. floydboy says:

    When the front end rolls into the picture, makes you think it’s a real car. Then BAM! LOL!

  9. DL says:

    Uh, name ONE vehicle with 3 wheels that has ever been a success; all the drawbacks of a motorcycle with all the drawbacks of a car, yet the advantages of neither.

    1. Ken says:

      You asked, so here goes. Polaris Slingshot and Can-Am Spyder. You should have said name one electric three wheeler that is a success and i would have agreed with you. The Spyder has been a good seller, but the dealers around here can’t keep the Slingshot in stock, it’s a hufe success.

      1. DL says:

        I wouldn’t consider either one of those a success. They are niche vehicles that sell in very small numbers. Heck, I’ve seen more Veyrons driving around than either of those.

    2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      The British manufacturer Reliant kept a series of 3-wheeled cars in production from 1952 thru 1997.

      Certainly Reliant was a small auto maker, and maybe that doesn’t fit your definition of “success”, but I suspect it fit’s Reliant’s!

      Bottom line: A 3-wheeled microcar is never going to be a mass market vehicle in the USA, unless our culture changes in significant ways. But the USA isn’t the world’s only market, by a long shot.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reliant_Regal
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reliant_Robin
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reliant_Rialto

  10. 3wheeler! says:

    I didn’t realize the tax code was specific to 4 wheels. That’s a bummer. Looks like 2 or 3 wheel vehicles were/are eligible if they were purchased in 2012 or 2013. Tax law is weird.

    1. Ken_3 says:

      And in 2015. I got 10% rebate for my Zero FX motorcycle. I think it ended again on 12/31/2016. And yes, tax laws are Very strange!

  11. Dale says:

    Good news! Electra Meccanica has rolled out their customer referral program.
    Even more reason to spread the word. For more information, join us at http://SoloOwners.net