Edmunds Tests Tesla Model X Towing – Video

SEP 28 2017 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 13

Rated to tow 5,000 pounds if properly equipped, the Tesla Model X is one of only a few plug-in electric vehicles with this level of hauling capability.

Towing With A Tesla

How well does the Model X perform while towing out in the real world?

To find out, the folks over at Edmunds put the X to the test.

Video description (for Part 1 video above):

Our Edmunds EV expert Dan Edmunds, director of vehicle testing, tests out the 2016 Tesla Model X EV’s towing prowess while hauling a 1,500-pound Happier Camper HC1 fiber-glass trailer. After all, this electric vehicle does have a tow hitch and a 3,500-pound tow rating.

0:38 – Let’s go camping
2:12 – First Stop
4:58 – Detour
6:22 – Drop the trailer

In Part 1 of the test, Dan drives the loaded-up Model X along the Tesla Supercharger network in California, from Santa Monica to Mojave to Lone Pine, with an emergency stop in Inyokern because range anxiety. This first day of driving 217 miles took about 8 hours.

Video description:

Our Edmunds EV expert Dan Edmunds, director of vehicle testing, tests out the 2016 Tesla Model X EV’s towing prowess while hauling a 1,500-pound Happier Camper HC1 fiber-glass trailer. After all, this electric vehicle does have a tow hitch and a 3,500-pound tow rating.

Part 2 is the nail-biter of the test with 99.5 miles and 4,000 feet of elevation gain. At only a third of the way to Mammoth Lakes, California, the range prediction looks dire with a big climb ahead and no Supercharger detour option this time. Is the Tesla able to make it to its destination? This second day of driving 300 miles totals about 12 hours.

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13 Comments on "Edmunds Tests Tesla Model X Towing – Video"

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Effective speed: 25 mph
Range per full charge: 166 miles

Total charging time: three hours, forty-five minutes.

Ya, this just doesn’t look like a whole heck of a lot of fun.

Imagine if it were a normal sized trailer as well which is what a majority of people haul.

The “majority of people” don’t pull trailers period and I’m sure that 4E never has.

Not saying that there isn’t a market for this, but its pretty small overall.

Like most things concerning EVs, it is going to take some time to address these market outliers and for now the Model X is easily the top EV for those who want to pull a trailer.

Rather then whine about the reduced range on the X pulling a trailer, why don’t you do something pro-active and positive like I did when I wrote emails to GM’s top management and BOD begging then to make some VOLTEC versions of their SUVs and Trucks???

Since I haven’t heard back from them I’ll have to assume that once again it will take Tesla putting out a compelling EV truck to get them off their asses although maybe the Outlander PEV will do the trick?

I’ve got a Model X and I tow a teardrop camping trailer. It’s lots of fun, really. Aerodynamics matter a lot to towing range (perhaps *the most*, unless you’re routinely climbing mountains) so a traditional teardrop shape or pop up is better than the boxy thing the Edmunds guy is driving. You do have to plan your trips around the supercharger/rv park network: you can charge overnight with an RV hookup, so it’s fine to arrive with 1% battery at your campsite and then leave in the morning with a “full tank”. The Edmunds guys actually covers most of the tips and tricks of EV towing pretty well. And you really have no choice but the Model X right now if towing is a thing you want to do.

A teardrop trailer is better than a regular/boxy RV trailer but I’m wondering if any foldup/collapsible RV trailers are available … not a tent trailer but a hard wall/roof RV that converts to a flat deck trailer. It seems that would have the best aerodynamics, although less convenient.

Oh, and on the east coast the supercharger network is spaced 60-70 miles apart, which is twice as close as you really need for a model X or S normally, but works out just right with reduced towing range, esp in the winter when the heater reduces your range further.

I don’t think (current) battery tech is up to the required level for “practical” BEV SUV’s or pickups.

Which has always confused me…. seems like the Model 3 should have been prioritized in front (way in front) of the Model X.

Just IMO,

A travel trailer with a 100kW-hr battery under the floor… that hooks up to the Model X battery.
That’s the ticket!

A Canadian couple (TeslaXCanada) towed a teardrop trailer from the west coast of Canada to the east, then down the east coast of the US, across the south, and back up the west coast in 2016. Not huge miles per day, but they did it.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCc165Q7JW2_4fofx7VaRL7w

I’m not quite sure what this proves, since the “X” was only rated at 3500 lbs (didn’t apparently have all the options required for 5,000 – they didn’t specify what that would be either), and 1,500 is such a small fraction of 3,500 that it isn’t much of a test.

What would be helpful to those considering a trailer would be a standard “X” pulling a real 3,500 lb trailer, and a ‘properly optioned’ one pulling a 5,000 lb one.

Oh ok, it appears the ‘standard’ 20″ wheels can go 5,000 but this car had the optional at extra cost 22″ wheels which lowered the rating to 3,500. Again, not much of a test here from what I can see.

I’m curious as to how much I can safely put on my BOLT ev. Hitches are being after-market offered already but I’m sure they void the warranty.

They offer an accessory hitch on the Chevy website…but insist on no towing