Edison Electric Institute Partners With DoE To Promote Widespread Adoption Of Plug-In Electric Vehicles

JUN 27 2015 BY MIKE ANTHONY 5

The Edison Electric Institue & the Department of Energy will collaborate to “promote and accelerate” adoption of plug-in vehicles.

DoE Secretary Ernest Moniz & EEI President Tom Kuhn signed an MoU “to take a variety of joint actions—including research, infrastructure, and outreach programs—to accelerate the widespread adoption of EVs.

Kuhn states:

“The electric power industry is a tremendous leader in moving the electric transportation market forward, and we are excited to work with our federal partners to bring about the economic, environmental, and security benefits of transportation electrification. Transportation electrification benefits electric utility customers, while also bolstering America’s energy security and sustainability. These are priorities our industry shares with our government partners.”

Moniz adds:

DoE Logo

DoE Logo

“The U.S. transportation system produces a third of the country’s carbon emissions, making it essential that we improve plug-in electric vehicle technology and increase their numbers on the road. Today’s announcement enhances the kinds of private-public partnerships needed to remain at the forefront of advanced vehicle technologies that reduce our emissions and provide safe, reliable transport for the American people.

Kate Brandt is the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer at the White House Council on Environmental Quality, comments:

“Today’s Memorandum of Understanding with the nation’s electric power industry allows the Department of Energy to tap into the experience and scale of an industry that is truly leading the way in moving the electric vehicle market forward. The federal government is doing its part too, and will benefit from this partnership. Executive Order 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade, directs Federal agencies to reduce their fleet wide per-mile greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent by 2025 and to ensure that by 2025 half of all new passenger vehicle acquisitions are for zero emission or plug-in hybrid vehicles.”

Sounds swell to us!

Full press release below:

“NEW ORLEANS (June 8, 2015) – The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a new private-public partnership that will identify and pursue collaborative opportunities between the government and the utility industry to promote and accelerate the nationwide adoption of electric vehicles (EVs).

During EEI’s Annual Convention in New Orleans, DOE Secretary Ernest Moniz and EEI President Tom Kuhn today signed a memorandum of understanding to take a variety of joint actions—including research, infrastructure, and outreach programs—to accelerate the widespread adoption of EVs.

“The electric power industry is a tremendous leader in moving the electric transportation market forward, and we are excited to work with our federal partners to bring about the economic, environmental, and security benefits of transportation electrification,” said EEI President Tom Kuhn. “Transportation electrification benefits electric utility customers, while also bolstering America’s energy security and sustainability. These are priorities our industry shares with our government partners.”

“The U.S. transportation system produces a third of the country’s carbon emissions, making it essential that we improve plug-in electric vehicle technology and increase their numbers on the road,” said U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz. “Today’s announcement enhances the kinds of private-public partnerships needed to remain at the forefront of advanced vehicle technologies that reduce our emissions and provide safe, reliable transport for the American people.”

“Today’s Memorandum of Understanding with the nation’s electric power industry allows the Department of Energy to tap into the experience and scale of an industry that is truly leading the way in moving the electric vehicle market forward,” said Kate Brandt, Federal Chief Sustainability Officer at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. “The federal government is doing its part too, and will benefit from this partnership. Executive Order 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade, directs Federal agencies to reduce their fleet wide per-mile greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent by 2025 and to ensure that by 2025 half of all new passenger vehicle acquisitions are for zero emission or plug-in hybrid vehicles.”

EEI’s collaboration with DOE builds on the electric utility industry’s leadership on transportation electrification. One example of this dedication is EEI’s fleet electrification initiative. Launched last year, this effort includes a commitment by EEI and its partnering member companies to invest at least 5 percent of their annual fleet budgets in plug-in vehicles and technologies.

Today, EEI announced that its fleet electrification initiative has exceeded the anticipated $50 million annual industry commitment, and will total more than $90 million in 2015, adding more than 800 new plug-in vehicles and 740 new charging ports to utility fleets.”

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5 Comments on "Edison Electric Institute Partners With DoE To Promote Widespread Adoption Of Plug-In Electric Vehicles"

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John F

If they want to have an impact, they should build a reliable level 3 charging network spanning the country. People will buy the cars if they can get where they want to go. Fleets will buy the cars, vans, and future trucks based on the economics of driving electric.

It has become clear that other than Tesla, no auto manufacturers are going to build anything like the supercharger network.

GSP

Exactly right.

EV drivers need to be confident that they will be able to L3 Fast charge when they arrive at their planned charging stop. This requires a minimum of TWO fast chargers at each location, and a commitment to maintain them with very little downtime. Also there needs to be commitment to expand the number of chargers when usage increases, so that EV drivers will not arrive and find all chargers in use.

Tesla has shown us what to do, as have other networks like telephones and Internet communication networks. So far it looks like no one is paying attention to Tesla’s network, or to the basic science of networks developed in the 19th century for telephones and telegraph.

GSP

Doug (dhanson865)

Yeah watch a movie from the 50s or 60s where a reporter or group of reporters rush to a line of phone booths in a lobby of a building.

Notice how they built 8 or 10 in a row not 1 or 2.

Or look at gas stations today, notice the bigger stations have 10 or more pumps. It looks tiny when I see a gas station with 4 pumps now.

Tesla superchargers look functional for crowds to use, while still looking new and elegant.

A single charger at a dealership looks like they are trying to hide it behind the building out of the way and often looks like it’s some relic from the 80s made by AT&T.

G2

+1

Jeff Songster

I can’t imagine why America’s utility companies use gasoline at all. If they provide electricity… all their vehicles should be phased over to that. If they also provide natural gas then they should use that. They would then have an interest in a charging refuelling net.