Eagle AID: Still Next To No Pulse Rate Detected in Europe’s Electric Car Market

MAY 1 2014 BY MARK KANE 8

In 2012, the Nissan LEAF was in a distant second place.

In 2012, the Nissan LEAF was in a distant second place.

According to the latest report from Eagle AID, the site that makes it a point to emphasize how poorly electric cars are selling, the electric car market in Europe has just “faint pulse“.

“This year was widely expected to be the year when electric cars were expected to gain some serious traction.”

“That’s thanks to last year’s market debut of Renault’s ZOE, followed later that year by other comparative sector heavyweights like BMW’s i3, Volkswagen’s all-electric eUp and last but not least the European market debut of Tesla’s much-praised Model S.”

“One quarter into the current year, apart from the sole bright spot in the region, – Norway, – precious little has changed. Judged by all the various industry yardsticks, the underlying message spelled out loud and clear is that Europe’s electric car market still operates at a very low charge.”

AID’s counter for Western Europe sees 0.4 percent sales penetration for EVs in the first quarter, which is about twice the 2013 result of 0.25 percent.

Anyways, 0.4% mean that up to 13,000 EVs have been sold in Europe in the first three months 2014, or over 4,000 per month on average.

But wait, there’s some good news from Eagle AID.

“AID’s own exclusively compiled figures show a more than doubling in March sales to a highest-ever 6,705 units, easily beating the region’s previous best monthly sales tally.”

But traditionally, the report ends with pessimistic words on sales growth:

“Dig below the headline figure, and it is all too clear why Europe’s 2014 electric car sales season got off to a flying start.”

“This is due in large measure to this year’s meteoric climb in Norway’s electric car sales.”

“This comparatively tiny Nordic market, which stands out on its own as an electric car owners’ paradise, soaked up almost half the electric cars sold in Western Europe in March.”

So, Norway’s growth outshines the growth in other such as Germany, UK and the Netherlands.  Growth is growth though, right?

Source: Eagle AID

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8 Comments on "Eagle AID: Still Next To No Pulse Rate Detected in Europe’s Electric Car Market"

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Hey Mark, this is pure EVs only, yes? Because I thought the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV was selling like gangbusters?

break break

I actually don’t mind the negativity in this report. Because… it’s based on facts, not pure speculation. Sometimes we delude ourselves with optimism. So if these are the facts on the ground, then we need to deal with them and figure out how to counter and improve. Know thy enemy….

Yes. It’s only pure EV’s. For PHEV’s too then you can add another 4-5000 units sold in the first quarter.

In the PHEV department it’s more or less just the Outlander and the Volvo V60 with about 2000 sold each.

But you can look at it from another perspectives. March was an all time record month for EV sales in Belgium, Austria, Germany, Denmark, Ireland, Norway and Sweden.

And even if total numbers and percentages are low it’s still showing that it’s on it’s way. And maybe a few of those countries are about to break through that roof which makes them penetrate the market for real.

Other PHEVs in Europe:

Opel-Vauxhall Ampera
Porsche Panamera S-Hybrid
Ferrari LaFerrari
Porsche 918
McLaren P1

Small volume, but very significant automobiles.

GSP

“I actually don’t mind the negativity in this report. Because… it’s based on facts,” The trick here though, is that it’s based entirely on the maximum amount of negativity possible while still remaining truthful. There’s only what, 3 or 4 models of EVs being sold in Europe? That’s like saying that gas cars are a failure in the European market because the Toyota Corrolla (the best-selling car around, afaik) only has a 10% market share (that’s my vaguest guesstimate based on nothing at all). With hundreds of different car models available, that’s nothing short of astounding that a single model would gain 10% (or whatever) market share out of all the cars, trucks, SUVs, Minivans, full-sized vans, buses, cube vans, and semi tractors being sold. So you can’t take this statistic with a mere *grain* of salt. How many Nissan Leafs are being sold as a percentage of total hatchback sales? Model Ses of sedans? Nobody is going to buy a Renault Zoe if they’re looking for a little sports car like a Miata or they need a pickup truck to haul 4×8 sheets of plywood on a daily basis. Someday, when every manufacturer has a model of vehicle that’s… Read more »

20 models of EV’s are sold in Europe.

16 is you don’t count the delivery/handy man vans.

14 if you count the i-Miev/C-zero/iON as one.

9 if you don’t count the PHEV’s.

7 if you don’t count the 2-seaters.

And the next one to be added to the list will be the e-Golf which should have their first deliveries within a couple of months.

“But until that day comes, this is a stupid metric.”

No it is not.
There would be far more models available in far greater numbers if evs were more popular.
But they are not.

I currently live in Munich, full of very wealthy people. The only time I saw a registered ev was 6 months ago, and it was a roadster. The only ev I saw recently was a model s and that was in Belgium.

Driving on fossil fuels is still too low, except in Norway.

“…it’s based on facts, not pure speculation…”

I’m sorry, but this is pure speculation:
“This year was widely expected to be the year when electric cars were expected to gain some serious traction.”

Who said that, where, when and in what context? They just made up their own inflated fantasy expectations, proclaim them to be mainstream just to provide a springboard to dive into the negativity.

Here’s *fact*: These Eagle AID clowns don’t recognize exponential growth when it hits them on their tomato noses. They see a sub 1% market share and dismiss it as disappointing and negligible.

Ah well, they will be so disappointed.

“Know thy enemy” lol