DIY Tesla Model S / Chevrolet Volt Mashup Results In 1,000 HP Setup – Video

JUL 24 2016 BY MARK KANE 24

Jason Hughes’ all-electric vehicles project moves forward with his two Tesla Model S drive units.

Jason Hughes: Tesla Model S - Motor and rear clip working in workshop

Jason Hughes: Tesla Model S – Motor and rear clip working in workshop

The motors have now become operational and will combined with a couple first generation Chevrolet Volt battery packs.

More about the project and upcoming 1,000 hp electric car to be presented at the 3000ev.com (and skie.net).

Tesla Model S – Motor and rear clip working in workshop

Unedited, single take, just got this stuff hooked up 5 minutes before filming. Hooked my latest custom control board to the motor, let it do it’s initial thing, and presto. Works perfectly. 🙂

Good thing I’ve got some safety coded into the controller so that it won’t go from D to R at high speeds… that would have been bad… as in, the motor probably would have flipped. haha.

Have to charge my Volt battery back up now, though… too much messing around.”

source: Jason Hughes

Categories: Chevrolet, Tesla, Videos

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

24 Comments on "DIY Tesla Model S / Chevrolet Volt Mashup Results In 1,000 HP Setup – Video"

newest oldest most voted

Yeeha! Hello Hot Rod magazine!? Are you scoping this out?

Nice! Here’s a link to more info.

http://electrek.co/2016/07/21/tesla-hacker-1000hp-electric-car-tesla-drivetrain-chevy-volt-batteries/

“2 Chevy Volt battery packs supported by 6 Tesla battery modules”

Volt are about 440 lb each, so two would be 880 lb if used as is. Not sure how much six Tesla modules will weigh (30 kWh total), probably 440 lb? Then total will be close to close to 1300 lb just for the batteries. That’s roughly similar to S85 battery weight, yet this will have almost 400 HP more than Ludicrous!

“Volt packs can do close to 20C discharge without issue, which is why he is using them and not only the Tesla modules.”

Power density on Volt is pretty spectacular. 20C puts to shame 6C from SparkEV! But then, aren’t they the same cells and similar packing?

I am curious why he kept the Tesla batteries; smaller / lighter weight (better energy density)?

SparkEV quoted from an Electrek article:

“Volt packs can do close to 20C discharge without issue, which is why he is using them and not only the Tesla modules.”

20C ?!?! WOW!

I was wondering why anyone would try to marry a Tesla drive unit with Volt battery packs. That answers that question!

The Volt must have a pretty heavy-duty battery cooling system, huh?

GM has impressed me with their Voltec engineering, and how it has been shown to be so reliable and problem-free over the years, despite its complexity. I’m now even more impressed!

Too bad GM farmed out the Bolt powertrain to LG Electronics.

High performance LiPo pouch cells for fast RC cars and aircraft can deliver well over 60C coninuous and 120C bursts.

The limiting factor with those cells is no longer the chemistry but the cables and the connector tabs where the cables are soldered to the cell – they get too hot and can damage the cell permanently.

I believe GM said the Bolt’s battery chemistry is GM’s. Probably the design, too. LG Chem is doing the cell and pack manufacturing.

You’re claiming that LG Chem, which a very few years ago started advertising a “200 mile battery”, is using GM chemistry for those battery cells; cells which LG is supplying for the Bolt?

Let’s just say that I am highly skeptical of that claim, and I’d be very interested to see an authoritative citation supporting your assertion.

“The Volt must have a pretty heavy-duty battery cooling system, huh?”

Remember our argument about which one is more robust in terms of cooling? (Tesla vs. Volt)

Volt has to because its smaller battery requires a much higher C discharging rate where the Tesla’s much larger pack doesn’t discharge at nearly as high C rate.

Bolt doesn’t use it because Volt’s pack design is heavier and bulkier. Bolt’s battery discharging (150kW) is much lower than Volt. 150kW for 60kWh is only 2.5C. Volt (gen 1)is almost 7C (6.9).

Thanks for your comment, MMF.

Yes, it did occur to me after making my post that there is a substantial difference between engineering a waste heat transfer system for a relatively small battery pack with very high “C” output, and a much larger battery pack with lower “C” output but greater overall waste heat generation.

So that doesn’t necessarily mean the Volt’s thermal management system is “better” than Tesla’s. The differences are substantial, so perhaps that’s a case of comparing apples to oranges.

However, none of that changes my reaction. I still find that to be impressive engineering by GM.

“it did occur to me after making my post that there is a substantial difference between engineering a waste heat transfer system for a relatively small battery pack with very high “C” output, and a much larger battery pack with lower “C” output but greater overall waste heat generation” In overall system level, yes, larger heat generation will require a bigger radiator… If the wasted heat by a 500HP engine can be dissipated by radiator, then the radiator is more than sufficient for a 80-90% efficient electric motor and its battery pack. So, the bottle neck is at the cell level. Tesla has more than 8,000 cells, so each cells generates less heat, so the package design is easier. The rest is about moving that heat to the radiator. Volt’s cell is under much higher stress and it needs far better heat transfer just to get them to the heat carrying fluids which also transfer the heat ultimately to the air at the radiator. So, the delicate design is about how that cell heats are transferred out of cell to air. In Tesla’s case, it took a simpler and easier approach with low C requirement and lower heat per cell.… Read more »

High c-rate discharge is not something new. The issue is that you can’t get both the highest gravimetric enrergy density and have the highest power density. PHEV cells are optimized for power density, BEV cells are optimized for gravimetric (specific) energy density. A Model S 90 kWh pack already gets near 700 hp at less than 6C. So it is optimized for weight, not power. A Volt pack is small in size, so 6C would mean too little power, so it is optimized for power density. It is much harder to lead in gravimetric energy density.

Except SparkEV as BEV has pretty much the same cells and packing as Volt. Then why only 6C on BEV? Same argument can be made for all BEV other than Tesla; their batteries may be capable, yet not utilized as such. But Tesla’s power is limited by the battery.

Frankly, Tesla should’ve made P60DL with 1000 HP like this guy is doing by using Volt type of battery (cell + packing). Heck, they probably could’ve made it 1500 HP by using only Volt type battery. And, of course, paint it plaid and call it Ball-1.

Spark Ev has different cooling design for space saving.

The cooling plate sandwiching of every other cells in the Volt adds a lot of bulk and weight.

2015/2016 SparkEV has cooling plates sandwiched between cells and uses LG Chem cells, just like Volt. 2014 has cooling plate at bottom like Bolt, but they battery is A123.

Yes, so the rest of chassis are already designed when A123 was the battery.

Why bother to upgrade the discharging rate higher?

Plus, Spark EV already got enough torque steer, no need for more power.

SparkEV said:

“Frankly, Tesla should’ve made P60DL with 1000 HP like this guy is doing…”

Ummm… no. I don’t think Tesla’s cars need more horsepower. They’ve got more than enough already. Yes, Tesla keeps shaving tenths of seconds off the drag racing time, but I regard that as merely a form of advertising; incrementally adding more power that’s not needed for any real-world driving situation, unless you consider drag racing to be “real world” driving.

It’s nice that Tesla’s cars can beat all but the most extreme of the high-end gasmobile “supercar” sports cars in a 1/8 mile drag race, but going further in that direction has no practical value other than generating more free advertising.

I’d much rather see Tesla focus its engineering capabilities on areas where improvement would actually be beneficial to owners and drivers.

Of course, it’s about marketing. P90DL is doing great, but imagine have P60DP (P for Plaid) that has more power than $2 million Bugatti and priced around $100K. That will be an exclamation mark.

This “Franken-EV” is probably gonna similar to strapping a rocket engine on a skateboard, just minus the actual rocket engine. 🙂

And will most likely smoke anything that DOESN’T have a rocket engine.

Would be fun to watch the end product race the White Zombie, or the Zombie 222.

I want to put an electric motore in my Hot Rod 27 track T. Right now I am looking for options that are relatively cheap. Maybe a wrecked FFE. Any Ideas?

I advise you to join the EAASV (Electric Auto Association Silicon Valley) e-mail discussion group and ask your questions there. Members include several who are extremely knowledgeable about converting cars to EVs.

No need to be actually located in the Bay Area, to ask questions on that forum.

https://beta.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/eaasv/info?referrer=norcalzennownersgroup

I want his workshop.

My understanding is the Tesla does not charge it’s pack 100 percent nor does it discharge 100 percent.
It’s pack is supposed to last 10 years.
What can a higher c rating do to a car that already does zero to 60 in 3 seconds.?

“What can a higher c rating do to a car that already does zero to 60 in 3 seconds.?”

0-60mph in 2.8 seconds?

Better 1/4 miles times?

Tesla said that 0-30mph is traction limited, 30-60mph is battery power limited.

So, there you go, 30-60mph can be improved with more power.

Tom said:

“What can a higher c rating do to a car that already does zero to 60 in 3 seconds.?”

More power delivered from the battery pack. Potentially a faster car, if the rest of the powertrain can handle the extra power and if the motor can deliver more horsepower.

Of course, the tradeoff of more power would be more waste heat, and potentially shorter battery life. But I would imagine that someone into extreme drag racing would gladly trade a small to moderate reduction in battery life for more power.