Connecticut Businessman Compares Charging Stations / EVs to Breakthrough Invention of the Microwave

JAN 10 2014 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 9

Doubt That Van is Electric, But We Still Support the Vision of CT Electric Car

Doubt That Van is Electric, But We Still Support the Vision of CT Electric Car

Ed Ingalls, owner of Newington Electric in Connecticut, decided to start a charging station division three years ago.

CT Electric Car Logo

CT Electric Car Logo

Newington Electric is considered a well-established electrical company in the state, according to the Hartford Courant.

When Ingalls launched the charging station division there were few plug-in vehicles in the state, which meant there was little work to be done by the division (known as CT Electric Car).

Quoting Ingalls:

“I just had an intuition.  “I had a good feeling. Chevy Volt and GMC — those guys have to be spending millions of dollars. If they’re doing this, they must know something I don’t know.”

Nowadays, CT Electric Car is a relatively busy company.  CT Electric Car has installed approximately 50 charging stations to date, but growth is expected soon.  To gear up for the boom, CT Electric Car is opening a 8,000-square-foot headquarters, which is three times the size of its current headquarters.  This facility will have a showroom full of chargers and a free charging station out in the parking lot.

Ingalls says more employees will be hired to accommodate the expansion.

As Ingalls states:

“It’s very exciting.  We’re at the beginning of a new commitment for a new division. As more people buy electric cars, I’m hoping that we will be the go-to installer.”

Getting in on day one is the right way to do business.  Ingalls is now ahead of the game and is planning for the future.  Ingalls believes that EVs are set to take off soon and he hope that CT Electric Cars grows dramatically with EV sales.

His new division, CT Electric Car, has so far posted modest sales — about 50 installations so far — but Ingalls is convinced that’s about to change. He sees electric cars about to take off, creating amped up demand for charger stations.

Ingalls expect demand for charging stations to grow so much that it matches his revenue brought in through his electrical general contracting business.

As Ingalls says:

“It’s the next coming thing in electrical.  Hopefully it’s the next microwave. It’s right in my wheelhouse, as they say.”

We think Ingalls will soon be rewarded for his efforts and his ahead-of-the-game attitude.

Source: Hartford Courant

Categories: Charging

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9 Comments on "Connecticut Businessman Compares Charging Stations / EVs to Breakthrough Invention of the Microwave"

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Ingalls sounds like a sure customer for a couple VIA Chevy vans –
a write-off and a sure win/win.

When will Tesla offer a licensing scheme for outside vendors to procure
Superchargers? I can foresee charging “filling stations” CHAdeMo, SAE
and Superchargers are on hand. When and if franchisees can offer varied
charging solutions at their business, we’ll experience a boom in EV adoption.

Charge installers seems an up-and-coming industry. A natural addition would
be the solar component as well – a one-stop shop for sustainable travel.

Well if it’s like the Microwave it will take 30+ years to hit 90% adoption.

http://www.compact.nl/img/C-2013-4-Derksen-06-groot.png

Who knew you would have a handy graph ready to go kdawg?

/this guy

And if it is like the microwave, we can expect a real shift in growth after 5-7 years. That would put us around 2016-2017. Sounds about right.

Jay, I think its time you add kdawg’s name to the contributor list as InsideEVs “graph master”….

LOL, I just find them on the interwebs. Pictures are worth a thousand words.

Its really an unfair comparison. One produces rubberized food, the other zero pollution cars.

“Nowadays, CT Electric Car is a relatively busy company. CT Electric Car has installed approximately 50 charging stations to date, but growth is expected soon.”

“His new division, CT Electric Car, has so far posted modest sales — about 50 installations so far — but Ingalls is convinced that’s about to change.”

I like to call it the “Science Oven”.

On that graph it’s probably closer to a dishwasher…at least the adoption slope. Or maybe the color tv after 1960. With these sorts of comparisons we have wide ranges in price, and other considerations. For example does a reasonable alternative to the ev exist? Of course, while the original curve of the ice,( it was replacing horses, not other autos) and even then it did not just sky-rocket. So it’s a combination of new technology, expense, and whether viable alternatives exist. Of course this assumes that ev’s are actual better which to me is rather a moot point, In most cases they are. Sorry if I am just belaboring the obvious. So basing it on replacement rates, hold-outs, and just plain better hybrids, the economy. I think we see something like % increases in sales where pure ev’s take 2014-2%, 2015-3%, 2016-4%, with a bump to around 10%-12% between 2017-2020, representing the bump when more people poor into the market as ev’s have now established themselves as a viable, and economical alternative to ice vehicles. I think we will probably level off around 30% near 2025 close to where the remaining pure ice’s are, the remainder being all other modes… Read more »