Con Ed’s Nifty Online Tool Compares EV Cost To Traditional Vehicles

AUG 13 2018 BY MARK KANE 29

Go ahead and give it a try.

New York utilities Consolidated Edison and National Grid launched an on-line tool to compare electric car prices/costs with conventional models.

As electricity sales to consumers is generally a stable market, plug-in electric cars opens whole new possibilities for the utilities – the volume could virtually double if every household would add a plug-in car. It’s not a surprise that through the tool they will try to encourage its customers to purchase an electric car.

The tool was developed by California-based Enervee and is available in two identical versions with the logo of both companies – Con Edison Cars and National Grid. We are not sure, but maybe other utilities will also be able to join the platform and have their own version.

Besides the base price, the calculator takes into account average costs of fuel/electricity over five years, NY rebate and federal tax credit.

As you can see below, the Tesla Model X 75D was compared to Lincoln Navigator:

Compare EV and ICE costs – Con Edison and National Grid

Compare EV and ICE costs – Con Edison and National Grid

Source: Greentech Media

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29 Comments on "Con Ed’s Nifty Online Tool Compares EV Cost To Traditional Vehicles"

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TM3x2 Chris

Finally, a tool to tell us that BEVs are better.

Mark.ca

The only new thing i learned is NY rebate discriminates against expensive evs.

Incentives used to sponsor luxury vehicles, not the smartest idea. But then again you probably disagree because you have grown up in a society where it’s okay to take from the poor and give to the rich.

TM3x2 Chris

Socialism for the wealthy, capitalism for everyone else!

Mark.ca

Yes, of course. When your poor ass buys an ev it’s just fine that i contribute to your purchase but when i buy it i’m on my own. Sounds fair.

james

If I remember correctly everyone has to breathe air… The incentive is not to buy expensive cars, but to by EV over non-EV. I can afford both but the incentive made me get the EV over ICE.

zzzzzzzzzz

Where are $10,000 incentives for bicycles? They are not just tailpipe free, but reduce traffic congestion and emissions by others this way, and don’t even need dirty giga-battery.

Yes yes I understand, you don’t need to scream on me, bicycles in the US are associated with with low social status undesirables who are not allowed to get any penny. Subsidies must be provided only to folks who are very well-off politically and financially /s

Dan F.

Notice that these EVs are cheaper only because of the tax credit and state rebates. Also no price assumptions are given regarding the cost of the electricity (or the gasoline) used.

So the real conclusions are: EVs will have to be much cheaper to compete post tax credits and rebates. and you need to have real information about the cost of the electricity you will be using to come to any real conclusions about operating cost.

james

EVs are more efficient no matter what fuel creates the electricity; but you have to include the whole supply chain for both, not just the EV. For gas to get into your tank, it starts as oil in the ground. Electric prices could double and it is STILL cheaper for me than gas, not true for everyone, but rarely is anyone looking for gas prices to NOT double.

Timothy Hughbanks

And what are your assumptions? That the emissions from an ICE come without cost and producers of ICEs and fossil fuels should be held blameless (and untaxed) for those emissions?

Ron M

We give subsides to nuclear plants coal and oil. How do you think the shale boom happened Department of Energy gave grants for 30 years to provide the research needed to extract oil from shale economically. New industries have always needed support.

antrik

On a site run by the electric utility, I think we can safely assume they used the actual price of electricity…

Nevertheless I agree that the cost comparison is of limited use, since it’s over only five years; and ignores maintenance costs. (And also ignores depreciation — which is higher than most combustion cars for the Leaf, but lower for Teslas…)

Vexar

Uh… the Tesla rebate is dodgy for 2018. I hope they maintain this when it goes away.

TM3x2 Chris

What in the world do you mean? Who will maintain what now?

james

Not at all. Teslas qualify for the full rebate until 12/31/2018, half rebate until 6/30/2019, and quarter rebate until 12/31/2019. Nothing dodgy at all, but thanks for the misinformation.

zzzzzzzzzz

Well, it is by delivery date. If you order Model 3 now you may hope there will be no delays and you will get it delivered before New Year within promised 2-4 months. But delays usually happen, there are many in the same situation, so who knows if you will get that extra $3750 and during which tax year (assuming you have at least $3750 or $7500 tax liability at all).

Hopefully you will get $7500 if you order now, but I would not bet on it if you postpone order till October.

marshall

It looks like one needs to add a thousand dollars a year in insurance costs over the Lincoln for the Tesla model. The other EVs appear to run about two hundred dollars extra a year over the gas models in the above comparison.

If the federal government allowed the tax credit to be carried over to subsequent years, that will help. Also the local governments need to make sure they are not hampering things and should be encouraging the local utilities to offer grants for workplace charging.

If Nissan and Chevy released some hard data as to how well their batteries are holding up in various climates, that might help too.

You can punch the numbers here: https://www.insure.com/car-insurance/insurance-rates-by-car.html

james

Sweet, let’s look at the maintenance cost as well… I bet the insurance for ANY huge SUV is higher.

zzzzzzzzzz

The law doesn’t allow this tax credit to be carried over.
And as tax code was revamped starting this year, you can’t even easily tell in every case if you will have enough tax liability for 2017 to get the full $7500 credit.

As for the insurance – most “sports” cars that encourage reckless driving have quite high insurance rates. E.g. Camaro. Expensive ones too.

Will

Going to check it out

OCRyan

Maintenance costs are a huge savings for EVs over ICE vehicles. I think a cost comparison tool that omits this is only giving a partial picture of ownership cost.

For example in an extreme case:

https://www.tesloop.com/blog/2017/8/30/tesla-model-s-hits-300k-miles-with-less-than-11k-maintenance-costs

menorman

Maintenance costs aren’t necessarily much of an issue with new cars since everything is covered under warranty, so for a couple years, that’s basically a non-issue.

Doubting Thomas

WTF!?! Con Ed’s online comparison tool is complete #%$&!% bulls**t! This online tool uses an electricity rate that is LESS THAN HALF the actual electricity rate used by Con Ed to gouge its customers.

I used the comparison tool on http://www.fueleconomy.gov/m to back into the $8,218 five-year fuel cost for the Jetta and the $3,412 five-year electricity cost for the Leaf as calculated by Con Ed’s online tool. If you click on the “personalize” link in the “Cost to Drive” section you can change the default prices for gasoline and electricity. To back into the Con Ed tool’s fuel and electricity costs, the gasoline cost is $3.12 and the electricity cost is $0.14/kWh while keeping the default 55%-city/45%-highway split and 15,000 annual miles.

https://fueleconomy.gov/m/m.do?annualMiles=15000&cityPercent=55&regular=3.12&midgrade=3.18&premium=3.43&diesel=3.22&e85=2.10&lpg=2.78&cng=2.17&electricity=0.15&units=MPG&action=customize2&id=39228&id=39860&rememberSettings=on&btnPersonalize=Personalize

Con Ed’s residential electricity rate is approximately $0.30/kWh. In fact, just the “Energy Delivery Charge” is $0.1832/kWh!!!

http://www.nyc.gov/html/cfi/html/NYCHA-electrical/img/Appendix%206.pdf

At Con Ed’s $0.30/kWh rate, the Leaf would cost $6,750 to charge over 5 years, not the paltry $3,412 figure from Con Ed’s online tool. Also, the $3.12 per gallon cost of gasoline is inflated for Con Ed’s service area where the average cost for a gallon of regular gas is currently about $2.95, not $3.12.

james

Holy crap, your gas is only $2.95? However it might be they are using premium as suggested for the Navigator.

Doubting Thomas

WTF!?! Con Ed’s online comparison tool is complete #%$&!% bulls**t! This online tool uses an electricity rate that is LESS THAN HALF the actual electricity rate used by Con Ed to gouge its customers.

I used the comparison tool on fueleconomy.gov/m to back into the $8,218 five-year fuel cost for the Jetta and the $3,412 five-year electricity cost for the Leaf as calculated by Con Ed’s online tool. If you click on the “personalize” link in the “Cost to Drive” section you can change the default prices for gasoline and electricity. To back into the Con Ed tool’s fuel and electricity costs, the gasoline cost is $3.12 and the electricity cost is $0.14/kWh while keeping the default 55%-city/45%-highway split and 15,000 annual miles.

https://fueleconomy.gov/m/m.do?annualMiles=15000&cityPercent=55&regular=3.12&midgrade=3.18&premium=3.43&diesel=3.22&e85=2.10&lpg=2.78&cng=2.17&electricity=0.15&units=MPG&action=customize2&id=39228&id=39860&rememberSettings=on&btnPersonalize=Personalize

Con Ed’s residential electricity rate is approximately $0.30/kWh. In fact, just the “Energy Delivery Charge” is $0.1832/kWh!!!

http://www.nyc.gov/html/cfi/html/NYCHA-electrical/img/Appendix%206.pdf

At Con Ed’s $0.30/kWh rate, the Leaf would cost $6,750 to charge over 5 years, not the paltry $3,412 figure from Con Ed’s online tool. Also, the $3.12 per gallon cost of gasoline is inflated for Con Ed’s service area where the average cost for a gallon of regular gas is currently about $2.95, not $3.12.

Bill Howland

Yeah, ConEd lies. Although it costs more to make electricity in the downstate NY area than in the buffalo area where I am from (10-11 cents/kwh 24/7/365 is the norm), there is still plenty of happiness for ConEd – even with their high priced dopey decisions over the decades (oil or nuclear fueled electricity, undergrounding expensive facilities and only having dirt cheap stuff above ground, when other utilities do exactly the opposite for obvious reasons), the only time ConEd is telling the truth is if the EV owner is dumb enough to take time-of-use rates.

Then the CHEAPEST after midnight rate might be 14 cents as they claim in their comparison, but make sure you pull the plug on everything in the home during the day as ‘super-on-peak’ is much over a dollar a kwh. So your car may be cheaper than gasoline, but you can’t live in your house.

Question for DoubtingThomas: Does the calculator assume the kwh in the battery ? Or does it also take into account the extra electricity needed to get electricity INTO the battery? (Charging inefficiency).

Doubting Thomas

I don’t know Bill. I just knew from experience that the Leaf’s electricity costs from Con Ed’s online tool were impossibly low under Con Ed’s current rates, and used the fueleconomy.gov online cost calculator to quickly check my math and illustrate/prove my point.

Bill Howland

As far as NY state customers are concerned – this thing is a joke. National Grid customers (the vast areas of the state other than high population but small area downstate) pay 10-11 cents kwh 24/7/365 – whereas downstate ConEd customers pay at least 31 1/2 cents / kwh. As was mentioned, 14 cents/kwh is only true IF you take optional TIME-OF-USE, which will bankrupt most subscribers.

But this ‘California Survey’ says the cost of a Nissan Leaf in both areas is exactly the same to the penny.

Its like most other things or surveys when they say NY electricity is 18 cents / kwh . That is a meaningless number since that is averaging in PASNY power at 4 cents/kwh and downstate power at up to $1.30 / kwh super-on-peak.

DS

That’s what I used to calculate my ev versus ice costs: https://gis.its.ucdavis.edu/evexplorer/#!/locations/start just personalize/update the costs (source: https://www.driveclean.ca.gov/pev/Costs/Calculate_Your_Costs.php)