Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 Hydrogen Fuel Cell Appears At SEMA (w/videos)

NOV 7 2016 BY MARK KANE 13

The latest GM’s hydrogen fuel cell concept – Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 (see unveiling) – made its first public appearance at  SEMA (aka the Specialty Equipment Market Association) in Las Vegas last week.

Moving forward, the US Army and GM are looking at FCV technology, and the logistics of hydrogen in the field, so it will be interesting to see how the collaboration and ultimate conclusions on the tech pan out.

On the positive side, the effects of using FCVs are clean water instead of emissions, and the capability to export electricity in the field.

Below:  Lots of gallery pictures from the show, plus some bonus live footage

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 fuel cell electric vehicle at 2016 SEMA

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13 Comments on "Chevrolet Colorado ZH2 Hydrogen Fuel Cell Appears At SEMA (w/videos)"

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it is a good idea to test bed this technology in military applications. if it works out, it can be like the internet. 🙂

i don’t think that i would count on the water being produced by a FCEV as being particularly potable, though.

Hmm, wonder what happens when one gets hit by a shaped charge. I wouldn’t want to be in one then.
Perhaps something to drive the generals around in the rear and I will get a look because GM made it not due to any actual questionable benefits of employing this technology in a combat role.

A fuel cell in combat could be entertaining in the wrong way for the drivers passengers and all nearby…
But Fuel Cells or even better EVs do have a couple advantages and that is the relative lack of noise and much smaller heat signature…
And is there any point in having a truck with three foot bed??
Shouldnt it just be an SUV at that point??

True. Silence is an advantage, plus no emissions would also help.
Well for the bed you could toss a bunch of packs in, tents, ammo, lots of stuff. You could mount a machine gun for instance.

There’s a lot of waste heat with FCV and some produce noise from the air compressor.
It’s already difficult dealing with common thing in combat zone. I wouldn’t add handling of hydrogen.

Nothing special happens when it gets hit, hydrogen just goes up and not down on hot exhaust pipe like standard army kerosene fuel. It was tested many times before, see below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QiD7thxC9UQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVNojwqylYM

Looks like GM borrowed a page or two from Jeep’s notebook.

now we can sneak up on countries and steal their oil so we can inefficiently turn it into hydrogen.

Another Fool-Cell Mobile…?

Such a waste of quality time !

Military use of FCEVs in the field is probably one of the least appropriate scenarios.

BEVs may be only partly appropriate, as refueling times are critical, and in a mobile battlefield, you can’t rely on power transmission lines. Portable solar can’t generate enough, and energy density of batteries is still very far away from that of fossil fuels.

I think the .mil are going to stay with fuel-based vehicles for a while yet… Givne that, Hydrogen is much more dangerous and difficult to store and transport than gasoline/diesel.

i would think gasoline and diesel would be more dangerous because of the higher energy density combined with flammability.

Absolutely

Oh Gawd, I though GM gave up on FCVs! A BEV version would be safer, more efficient and easier to find fuel in the field. Electricity is everywhere and can be generated by solar cells in remote plas. Hydrogen would have to be shipped in in ALL cases, expensive and difficult logistically.