ChargePoint Adds Former GM CEO Rick Wagoner To Its Board

APR 9 2017 BY MARK KANE 23

GM Product Boss Bob Lutz And CEO Rick Wagoner Congratulate Each Other On The Chevrolet Volt Concept’s Launch A 1,000 Year’s Ago

ChargePoint has appointed former General Motors CEO, and the man who green-lite the Chevrolet Volt, Rick Wagoner to its Board of Directors.

The largest charging network provider is currently approaching 25 million charging sessions and some 200 GWh of energy dispensed, via about 34,000 charging stations (including 500 DC fast chargers).

ChargePoint is also gearing up for the introduction of its next generation 400 kW Express Plus chargers (read InsideEVs’ own Tom Moloughney’s interview with ChargePoint on the topic of 400 kW uber-charging here).

The addition of Rick Wagoner to the board suggests that even broader expansion plans are in store for the charging network, and require Rick’s even closer association with major automakers.

ChargePoint stats – April 2017

Tom Moloughney checks out ChargePoints new hotness at CES in Las Vegas In January

Says ChargePoint on the hire:

“ChargePoint, the world’s largest electric vehicle (EV) charging network, today announced the appointment of Rick Wagoner to its Board of Directors. Wagoner is an automotive industry leader, having held various management positions at General Motors (GM) around the world for more than three decades.

He became the youngest president and chief executive officer (CEO) in GM’s history in 2000 and was appointed to chairman and CEO in 2003, tasked with addressing several long-term challenges while creating new growth opportunities. Wagoner brings deep automotive industry and business expertise to the ChargePoint board, coupled with an acute awareness of the importance of e-mobility in the future of transportation.”

“Wagoner is an advisor to and investor in a number of startups and early stage companies, including several in the automotive space. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of Graham Holdings, Invesco and Aleris Corporation. Recently, Wagoner served as chairman of Dematic Holdings and a director at Rivian Automotive, among other appointments.

In addition to actively participating in many boards and advisory positions, he is an honorary member of the Mayor of Shanghai’s International Business Leaders Advisory Council and formerly served as a member of The Business Roundtable and The Business Council.

Wagoner is a graduate of Duke University and received an MBA from Harvard Business School.”

Pasquale Romano, president and CEO, ChargePoint, Inc. said:

“Rick brings decades of expertise from the automotive business to the ChargePoint board, having led one of the world’s largest companies. He has accumulated a deep level of industry experience overseeing the development of some of the most iconic automotive products while tackling big challenges in business. This, along with his knowledge of large, complex ecosystems, makes him a valuable asset to the ChargePoint team as we continue our mission to make it possible for everyone to drive electric.”

ChargePoint Express Plus (shown in “available” and “in use” modes)

While Wagoner himself added:

“I’ve been a student of the auto industry for more than four decades and I’m excited to see it at the threshold of its largest transformation since its founding. The time for electric mobility has finally arrived, the important drivers of EV growth currently coming together and it’s clear that charging infrastructure will be one of the key factors in the success and growth of EVs. I’m eager to work with ChargePoint as the company continues to develop charging solutions to support the significant growth of the electric vehicle market.”

Can a tie-up, or closer association with General Motors be far behind?

Categories: Charging

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23 Comments on "ChargePoint Adds Former GM CEO Rick Wagoner To Its Board"

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Maybe Rick can change Mary Barras attitude on infrastructure for EV’s by the time the Model 3 starts to ship to non Tesla and SpaceX employees, this September, when Tesla plans on making 4,000 Model 3’s, per week, not per Month!

GM could pick some routes, like Vancouver, BC, to Portland, OR,to San Diego, CA, and announce the will be building a Charge Point Express High Speed Charging Corridor for the Bolt EV and Future EV’s, and generate some positive news, goodwill, and a start of buzz!

Denver to Salt Lake City to Las Vegas to Los Angeles, would be a great 2nd announcement!

Key West to Jacksonville to Myrtle Beach to Atlantic City to New York to Boston – that would be a great 3rd announcement, quickly followed by a a full North American Charging Infrastructure Roll Out plan and Map, showing CCS Charge Point (& CHAdeMO) Express Charging Stations at 60-80 Mile Intervals, in groups of 4’s to groups of 10’s, is higher EV Traffic Areas at leat from the Mexican Border, up to and including Canada!

Such an announcement from GM before the Model Y ships from Tesla, would be a signal that they are finally ‘Getting it’, when it comes to EV’s!

If such a planned coverage is not expressed by GM by then, even if in partnership with VW, BMW, & FORD, we will know clearly that they don’t have EV’s as Any Kind of Priority!

Dave86

8 years ago GM required a government bailout. Today, Tesla’s market cap is on par with GM’s. How many more wake up calls does GM need?

Yes, GM would do well to invest in company like Charge Point to boost EV sales. Building the networks Robert describes is the new direction GM needs to take their business. And the good news is that it won’t cost GM very much money.

William

“The Good News Is” hoping that GM will Actually Spend “Very Much Money”! I will not believe it, until I actually see GM pull the trigger, on buying into the EV charging bussines segment.

The $500 Million GM partnership with LYFT ridesharing, to bring Express Drive to the forefront, should demonstrate GM is not lagging in its ability to transform its mobility solution focus.

William

Maybe GM throws a $100 Million Bucks at Chargepoint, for a controlling 50% stake of the of the private company. That should raise a few eyebrows, amongst the EVangelicals, over at Tesla.

Stranger things have happened, however unlikely!

Dave86

I had very similar thoughts, with $100M being pocket change for GM. And as Tesla has shown, $100M can build a lot of infrastructure that enables cross country travel.

William

Not only will the QC infrastructure build out be expedited in North America, the spots, where the VW “Diesel Gate” QC money runs out, can be filled in, for more through ChargePoint coverage!

When the Tesla Model 3 starts getting the attention of the public, who are still yet non-EV literate in 2018, the Chevy Bolt, lack of QC charger availablity issue, is going to be a significant Achilles Heel, that GM will have to contend with, if they want to compete and sell EVs along side the likes of Tesla and it’s Model 3.

Terawatt

Robert, your link doesn’t work (404 not found for your EVfest site).

Exon valdese

This will be the next company to be mismanaged and go bankrupt. Wagonner is part of the old boys club… Sucking money from companies and getting a free ride. His kind are not true leaders.

ClarksonCote

ChargePoint is already mismanaged.

ffbj

Meh.

Mister G

Rick Wagoner might sabotage charge point by arguing for less innovative products.

Ocean Railroader

Why do these companies need to buy such expensive CEO’s.

It’s always a story about some big expensive guy moved over from Company A to start up Company B?

I really think something like a charging company could easy train it’s own people to run something like it.

Vik

Rick Wagoner was a CEO that worked his way from the bottom and green lit all the cars that were hits post GM bankruptcy, which other people took credit for, cars like the volt, and Cruze. The reason GM went bankrupt in 2008 was because GMAC which was a separate entity from GM, decided that auto loans weren’t enough and that they really had to get into the housing loans market. When housing market collapsed GMAC’s and every other bank that partnered with GM dealerships had their assets frozen and couldn’t give out auto loans essentially halting a majority of Auto sales. The reason Chrysler also went bankrupt was because they were also financed by GMAC, while Ford survived because Ford credit only did auto loans and didn’t touch the housing market.

Mister G

The credit freeze was a direct result of Wall Street greed and corruption in the form of sub prime loans, credit default swaps, mortgage backed securities, and reckless borrowing/spending. I remember a December 2006 headline in the financial times newspaper “shortage of Bentleys for wall Street executives”. Now we know how they were able to pay for their lavish lifestyles. I argue that GMAC failed due to wall Street greed and corruption that resulted in the GREAT RECESSION. The moral of the story is history will repeat itself and here we go again lol.

William

The. Chargepoint/GM dilemma, here in So. Cal, is that the Scott Robb. Honda dealer has a nice new Chargepoint Dual Quick Charger, and no remotely compelling EV to sell on their entire lot, that can use either of the two QC plugs!

Add to that, the Win GM/ Chevy dealer, a few miles across town, has more than a handful of QC Bolts, in stock ready to go, and only ONE level 2 (j1772) charger on their lot!

GM has been absolutely dragging their collective feet on any meaningful preliminary rollout, of any substantive QC infrastructure, for their dealerships and beyond.

No wonder the Tesla Stock market cap passed up the GM Stock MC this past week on Wall Street, just like Ford was put in the dust the previous week.

Mister G

GM sells ICE vehicles with a dab of BEVS to meet CARB requirements. If CARB is eliminated say goodbye to all GM EVS.

M Hovis

I failed to see this interview with John Dabels when it first appeared — very interesting! There’s one big question that might have been asked of him, that I have never seen answered by anybody. He says that, once the EV1 program ended, it was necessary to get them all off the road so GM would not be liable for replacement parts. But why was this not an issue for the S-10 electric pickup, some of which were actually sold, not just leased? The fact it was based on a common gasoline vehicle means nothing, as many parts were completely different — besides being electric, it was FWD, not RWD or AWD with a transfer case. Was GM negligent by letting those vehicles escape into the wild, or does this argument not hold water?

Bill Howland

The only public docking stations in my area that have problems and/or are defective are the ChargePoints – some have been fixed multiple times – amazing for a glorified ‘light switch’.

Wasn’t it Wagonner who admitted his biggest mistake was cancelling the EV1 project? There must have been multiple ‘sub decisions’ that were also brain-dead since all those expensive ‘scary’, enthusiasm-killing ads had to be approved and paid for -anyone not half brain-dead would have realized AT THE TIME they were a total waste of money – just another decision that ultimately forced the once proud (although admittedly SLEAZY) company into bankruptcy.

Maybe its fitting that this company waste its CA$H on an incompetant ‘vanity’ director.

That way, they can provide more expensive, wrong-headed products as long as the subsidies permit. Then they can also file for bankruptcy when the Gravy-Train finally ends.

SJC

This is the guy who crushed the EV1s,
not the best choice.

John gibb

Time to sell GM stock, Recycling Wagoner is a old boy decision,not a sound business move.There was a reason he was forced out prior to the bailout.

Ben

Fundamental culture is less easy to change than drug addiction. The news of Rick Wagoner chills me to the bone! …to the bone!!! His past operating system and understanding of the universe was based on autos containing some sort of combustion. At best Charge Point will become an isolated, rather than interconnected player. At worse look for the breakup of the West Coast Electric Highway. With Wagoner running the show at ChargePoint expect evgo even other groups to become more significant players setting beneficial examples.