CEO Elon Musk Reconfirms Bigger Tesla Model 3 Trunk Opening Via Twitter

JUL 13 2016 BY STEVEN LOVEDAY 95

Tesla Model 3

Tesla Model 3 Trunk Opening Prior To Any Known Adjustments

One major complaint revealed at the initial unveiling of the Tesla Model 3 was in regards to the lack of adequate trunk space, or more specifically, the small opening.

Those that were able to see the car up close commented that the trunk was lacking, and suggestions were given for a hatchback style similar to that of the Model S.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk used Twitter to explain the situation to consumers. He made it clear that the smaller, traditional trunk opening and lack of space was due to an attempt to assure more rear headroom.

model 3 trunk space tweet

Musk’s Initial Tweet About The Tesla Model 3 Trunk Opening

He also noted that the rear seats will have a fold down option to make room for bigger items. At this point, it seemed that changes to the Model 3 trunk were not a priority.

Later, Musk announced that initial plans had changed and that Tesla was, in fact, looking into options to increase the size of the trunk opening.

Some pictures of a Model 3 prototype have surfaced and the trunk seems unchanged, however, Musk confirmed once again on Twitter that the final production vehicle will have a larger trunk opening. No official details have been publicized.

model 3 trunk space tweet 2

Musk’s Recent Tweet Confirming That The Tesla Model 3 Will Get a Larger Trunk Opening

The video below shows the limited space in the trunk and the small size of the opening:


Source: Tesla Updates

Categories: Tesla

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95 Comments on "CEO Elon Musk Reconfirms Bigger Tesla Model 3 Trunk Opening Via Twitter"

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mhpr262
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mhpr262

Oh god …. a …. “Falcon” hatch …???

Sublime
Guest
Sublime

The whole metal top now rolls open, it’s called the a “sardine” roof. It’s guaranteed to not delay the release.

Dave S.
Guest
Dave S.

Perfect! Lol

Kosh
Guest
Kosh

Tambour Roof!

TomArt
Guest
TomArt

😀

Jacked Beanstalk
Guest
Jacked Beanstalk

Introducing the new Falcon Hatch. It can open if a roof is only a few inches above the hatch, or if one of those trucks with a front ladder overhang parked up against your rear bumper.

Mike
Guest
Mike

thing is though, its only small compared to the Model S hatch (sorry, lift back).
When compared to similar sized sedans it is about the same size.
Another storm in a teacup for folks who complain about anything that does meet the own invented expectations.

John
Guest
John

Tesla is all about making things better.
Our old civic had a decent sized trunk for a small car, but the opening was so small that getting things in and out was a royal pain.

We’ll see what the creative geniuses at Tesla came up with to solve the problems!

krona2k
Guest
krona2k

The point of a hatchback is you can put the seats down and open up the whole back window to allow easy stowing of large objects.

I really think they need to offer two designs, one of those or value rear passenger space and those that value cargo space.

I’m not sure this design would be enough to put me getting a Model 3 but it would be occasionally annoying.

philip d
Guest
philip d

I’m guessing the liftback will eventually come in the form of a taller, less sleek and sexy Model Y version. Sort of how the Model X is a taller, less sleek and sexy version of the Model S.

I think they had to come out with the cooler looking sedan first but were unable to design the smaller M3 to accommodate the back passengers without loosing the liftback.

Then once the Model Y comes out they will have both a liftback CUV and a sedan for those weirdos that actually prefer a trunk.

Priusmaniac
Guest
Priusmaniac

All other things being equal what would it actually take to make two Model 3 versions?
It sure would not affect the battery or propulsion system.
The seats would be the same as well.
In fact just the back top half would be different. So that is a few body parts, the glass and rubber joint.
Not such a big deal.
So your idea is quiet feasible indeed, certainly with 400000 reservations.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

“In fact just the back top half would be different. So that is a few body parts, the glass and rubber joint.
Not such a big deal.”

Coming from someone lacks any automotive experiences.

It adds complexity and inventory to the manufacturing process.

If Tesla is going to bother with that, then they might as well just go with the Model Y or Model 3 based Crossover which would make far more sense.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

ModernMarvelFan said:

“If Tesla is going to bother with that, then they might as well just go with the Model Y or Model 3 based Crossover which would make far more sense.”

Exactly.

I seriously doubt Tesla nixed a rear hatch design for the Model ≡ on a whim. The same thing that lead to them deciding to make it a regular sedan, with a more or less regular trunk, will prevent them from doing a redesign at this late date.

Besides, from Tesla’s viewpoint, I would guess they are pleased with all the requests for a rear hatch on the Model ≡, because that indicates they should get a lot of customers for the Model Y.

If Tesla puts a rear hatch on the Model ≡, then why even bother to make a Model Y? Diff’rent strokes for diff’rent folks. Not everyone wants a rear hatch.

spiceballs
Guest
spiceballs

Agreed, a la Mazda 3 or 6 sedan or hatchback

Someone out there
Guest
Someone out there

It would require
* new clay models
* more wind tunnel tests/computer simulation
* a new set of stamping tools
* reprogramming of manufacturing robots
* retraining of assembling staff
* crash testing
and probably more that I don’t know about as I’m not in the car manufacturing business.

TomArt
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TomArt

You’re talking about structural modifications to the frame – moving supports around – they would have to crash test that version separately and certify it separately. Major deal.

Anti-Lord Kelvin
Guest
Anti-Lord Kelvin

Here in Europe, for sedans, we have to different version names for that. The four doors, like the actual Model 3 prototypes, and five doors, like Model S. Maybe, Tesla will implement the to versions, and a third to the Y, … an a fourth for the wagon version,…and a fifth for the coupé version,…and a sixth for the convertible two doors version,…do I have to continue? Don’t they enough to do scaling their production from 2020 to 2018 and trying to make the most future US owners able to take advantage of the federal tax rebates before its extinction?

Priusmaniac
Guest
Priusmaniac

I guess in Europe there is more concern about the abnormal 10% duty tariff, the super high 21% VAT on ev and the extra cost that having a Tilburg intervention on the cars implies and still increase the price a few thousands further.
US tax rebate doesn’t apply anyway.

Jsmay311
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Jsmay311

Look closer.

The vertical dimension of the trunk opening may not be much smaller than a typical sedan trunk. But the lengthwise dimension is seriously deficient. By “lengthwise”, I mean how most trunk openings extend towards the front of the car and allow you to (for example) lower a fully-filled grocery bag straight down into the trunk without tilting it.

Most sedan trunk lids/doors (or whatever they’re called) extend back a ways from the rear windshield, which allows more depth to the trunk opening. In contrast, the M3 concept’s rear windshield extends almost all the way back to the rear, so the trunk opening is more vertical. That shape would seriously restrict the size and shape of objects that can fit through it.

Trollnonymous
Guest
Trollnonymous

This still won’t satisfy those wanting a hatchback……lol

A descent effort on Tesla’s part I guess.

If you want a hatchback, then the M≡ is not for you so don’t buy it.

Ambulator
Guest
Ambulator

Indeed, I wrote the Model 3 off as soon as it was revealed. That doesn’t mean I think it is a poor choice for others.

I like the Bolt, even with the slow charge rate and lack of infrastructure. Others might find that objectionable enough not to buy. That’s what choices give us.

And what up with us having to fill out our names and email addresses every time? Will this get fixed?

Trollnonymous
Guest
Trollnonymous

Huh, where’d my post go?!?!?!?

Anon
Guest
Anon

Troll Heaven? 😉

Trollnonymous
Guest
Trollnonymous

Hehehe…..
We only have H E Double Hockey Stix!

Driverguy01
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Driverguy01

I can safely say we were all caught by suprise to see a trunk instead of a hatch on the 3. Who predicted that? nobody that i can remember.
In my Volt, i carry more stuff than i would care for but that fact that i can is a good enough reason to want another hatchback.
Enough people have mentioned it so Tesla will have to oblige eventually. I’ll either wait or buy a used S is all.

mustang_sallad
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mustang_sallad

Yup, hatchback or bust for me. This alone will push me towards the Bolt

Koenigsegg
Guest
Koenigsegg

So you’re going to go with an ugly hideous cheap looking econobox because of a small trunk (i’ve never used the hatch in my Volt in 6 months)

LOLOLOLOLOL

Bro1999
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Bro1999

37.5k Bolt will be available thus year.
When will the $35k Model 3 be available? Based model, not fully loaded? Late 2018?

jelloslug
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jelloslug

In theory a $37.5k Bolt could possibly be available this year in California only. In reality they will all be moderately optioned and possibly marked up over MSRP. If you like someplace that is not a CARB state you will not see a Bolt until middle to late 2017.

John
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John

I will take the Model 3 + Supercharger access. Good luck trying to charge your Bolt. Thanks!

Ziv
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Ziv

Within a year of the Bolt and the Leaf2 hitting the market there will be more CCS fast chargers than there are Superchargers. And good luck waiting for a III.
Superchargers are going to be faster than CCS for the foreseeable future, but again, once the Bolt and Leaf2 are rolling around the CCS fast chargers will have a reason to get upgraded to more than 50 kW charge rates.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

“Good luck trying to charge your Bolt.”

Don’t need luck. You can already drive from Seattle to San Diego on CCS today.

Sure, its east/west coverage isn’t as good. But neither was SC back in 2012 before Model S was launched.

By 2017, the CCS coverage should improve significantly.

Beside, anything more than few hundreds miles, I would fly rather than drive.

Priusmaniac
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Priusmaniac

Charging 30 minutes is long but charging more than one hour is an eternity.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

Charging for 30 minutes will get your more mileage/range than LEAF due to larger 60kWh battery.

So, even 30 minutes would get you about 100 miles..

More than 1 hour would get your 200 miles of range.

How often do you drive that far? Even the 60kWh Model S don’t charge anywhere close to 100kW speed.

Priusmaniac
Guest
Priusmaniac

The Model S 60 can supercharge at 135 KW exactly like the others Model S. Even the Model 3 will be able to supercharge at 135 KW. We just don’t know how long it will take for the power curve to decline to avoid over heating. We also don’t know the exact price of supercharger access option but we know it will be able to supercharge. Normally a smaller battery tend to be easier to cool so there are reasons for an optimistic curve for Model 3 supercharging especially since it will benefit from the latest Tesla technology.
The Bolt, even with the best technology can only charge at max 50 KW if that is the charger’s maximum power. So you start with an unimprovable handicap straight away. Of course if one day there are 150 or 350 or 500 KW CCS, it will be different but Superchargers are at 135 KW right now and can be a 500 KW as well or even earlier by the time the CCS is at 500 KW.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan
“The Model S 60 can supercharge at 135 KW exactly like the others Model S. ” Completely LIE! Maybe you should check on the facts before you speak. Just because it hooks up to the 135kW charger, it doesn’t mean it charges at 135kW. Especially on the older S60 with only 60kWh battery, not the detuned 75kWh version. “Even the Model 3 will be able to supercharge at 135 KW. We just don’t know how long it will take for the power curve to decline to avoid over heating. We also don’t know the exact price of supercharger access option but we know it will be able to supercharge.” Sounds like you don’t know anything at all. LOL. “Normally a smaller battery tend to be easier to cool so there are reasons for an optimistic curve for Model 3 supercharging especially since it will benefit from the latest Tesla technology.” Smaller battery is easier to cool only in terms of total heat. But when the C rating is higher, it actually generates far more heat per cell thus making the cooling more difficult. “The Bolt, even with the best technology can only charge at max 50 KW if that is… Read more »
Tony Williams
Guest

Lots of numbers splashed around.

No Tesla vehicle charges above 120kW as of today

Yes, the Superchargers are 135kW capable between TWO cars.

The original Tesla 60kWh barely hits 100kW

The 70-75kWh Tesla cars can get very close to 120kW at 365 amps (about 360mph, assuming there isn’t another car charging on the A or B half). Slightly less than 150 miles in 30 minutes, assuming the battery is burned down to near zero at the start of the charge.

********

The Bolt EV is only going to add “100 miles” in 30 minutes at 120 * 400v max = 48kW (ideal conditions, assuming better than 4 miles per kWh burn rate)

The CCS only chargers that are up and down the west coast of the US are slow 24kW chargers. It will take over an hour to add 100 miles, and probably 2.5 hours or more to hit 200 miles.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

Priusmaniac said:

“The Model S 60 can supercharge at 135 KW exactly like the others Model S.”

Hmmm, well, that turns out not to be true. Even with Tesla cars, larger capacity battery packs can charge more quickly, on a miles added per minute basis.

Here’s a graph illustrating the point, from the official Tesla Motors forum:

View post on imgur.com


web page:
https://forums.teslamotors.com/forum/forums/model-s-supercharging-times-compared-s60-s70d-s85-p85d-s85d

* * * * * *

@ModernMarvelFan:

There was no need to be insulting. Nobody knows everything about every subject. Should we ridicule you the next time you get your facts wrong?

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

I didn’t want to be insulting until he claimed I spread “FUD” in his comments and his usual Bolt bashing comments.

Yes, I agree. You are right. I should take the high road and focus on the topic. It would be good for everyone.

Rexxsee
Guest
Rexxsee

The Bolt is 10k too expensive for what it gives.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

“The Bolt is 10k too expensive for what it gives.”

Why is that?

Are you saying that a car with more interior passenger volume than a Model S should cost less than $27.5K?

Or Are you saying that a car with better 0-60mph performance than LEAF and more than 2x the EV range and more interior passenger volume should cost the same as the LEAF?

So, you think the superior size and performance of the 200 miles+ Bolt should cost the same as a 84 miles LEAF with less interior passenger volume and worse acceleration?

Is that another wishful thinking that is unrealistic? You do drive a LEAF, don’t you? So, you should know the capability of the car, no?

Now, Even Tesla can’t be sure that they will make money on the Model 3 at $35K, then why should the Bolt be $10K cheaper since Tesla got the lowest battery cost on the market?

I guess you prefer companies to make cars at loss and sell to you for $10K cheaper.

Unless you can give concrete evidences on why the cars can be made $10K cheaper without using EV1 conspiracy, then it is just another rant from you again.

koz
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koz

Because the comparable ICE cars are $15-20K. The Model 3 comps are $29-50K.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

“Because the comparable ICE cars are $15-20K. The Model 3 comps are $29-50K.”

Name me the comparable ICE cars that has the interior passenger volume that is more than the Model S and can do 0-60mph in less than 7 seconds and cost $15K-$20K MSRP.

Priusmaniac
Guest
Priusmaniac

Actually Koz means:
A Bolt comparable sized and styled ice car goes for 15-20 k$.
A Model 3 comparable sized and styled ice car goes for 29-50 k$.
So having the Bolt at the same price as the Model S is on that ground alone a question mark.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

“Actually Koz means:
A Bolt comparable sized and styled ice car goes for 15-20 k$.
A Model 3 comparable sized and styled ice car goes for 29-50 k$.
So having the Bolt at the same price as the Model S is on that ground alone a question mark.”

Then both you and koz are wrong. If you ignore performance and interior space, then comparable style/size is meaningless.

A Toyota Corolla is comparable style (4 door sedan) and size (within 2 inches of length) is only $17K.

Unless you mean prestige which is neither size or style.

The point remains that there are no ICE cars that are similar in the interior size of the Bolt and Performance at $15-$20K range, same for the Model 3.

You are just blindly by your bias against the Bolt.

Maybe you are spreading your FUD against the Bolt here as you have always done so against all GM cars…

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

“Because the comparable ICE cars are $15-20K. The Model 3 comps are $29-50K.”

Name me the comparable ICE cars that has the interior passenger volume that is more than the Model S and can do 0-60mph in less than 7 seconds and cost $15K-$20K MSRP.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

ModernMarvelFan

“…Tesla got the lowest battery cost on the market”

That’s a guess, not a fact. We don’t know what Tesla’s costs are compared to LG Chem’s. Maybe Tesla’s per-kWh cost for batteries from the Gigafactory will be lower than the $145/kWh which GM is paying LG Chem; and maybe Tesla’s cost will be higher. You don’t know, and neither does anybody else. At this stage, even Tesla can’t have more than an estimate of what the per-kWh cost will be for cells from the Gigafactory.

Mark Roest
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Mark Roest

My understanding is that GM is paying $145/kWh for CELLS, and BATTERIES were costing Tesla $195/kWh, and recently someone claimed it went down to $160 but I’ve not seen confirmation.

Kdawg
Guest
Kdawg

I use mine every day.

Weird… everyone is not the same. Huh.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

“Weird… everyone is not the same.”

It’s amazing how many people seem to have difficulty grasping something that should be painfully obvious, innit.

If everyone had the same needs and wants in a car, then there would be only one model of car or light truck sold, instead of hundreds.

Jacked Beanstalk
Guest
Jacked Beanstalk

Oh, you don’t use the hatch on a Volt? Well that settles it. No automaker should ever build another hatchback because nobody uses them.

Thanks for clearing that up.

DonC
Guest
DonC

I like the design of the trunk lid. Gives more room than if the struts were internal. Hopefully it won’t have any issues. Seems reasonably straightforward, at least in areas without a lot of ice and snow. Anyone know if other companies have used this design?

It’s a small car so expecting a ton of cargo room seems unrealistic.

Kdawg
Guest
Kdawg

I don’t think the amount of cargo room is so much of an issue, it’s just that the opening is so small. So if you have unusually shaped objects, you can carry them in a hatch, but not in a trunk.

Also loading/unloading becomes an issue. I can throw 20 bags of mulch in the back of my Volt no issue. I’m trying to picture how I would do this in a Model 3.

Koenigsegg
Guest
Koenigsegg

Im trying to picture having to actually open my trunk.

6 months with my 2016 Volt and I have not once needed to use the trunk.

Kdawg
Guest
Kdawg

Different strokes for different folks.

VazzedUp
Guest
VazzedUp

Maybe you should have purchased a motorcycle or a miata.
Don’t disparage people who make full use of their vehicle, just because you do not.

philip d
Guest
philip d

Yeah, I’m a little bummed about the trunk. We put a deposit down anyway.

In my compact Volt I can fit my medium sized dog crate in the back with the seats up. No way that will be physically possible in the Model 3.

Murrysville EV
Guest
Murrysville EV

@DonC:

I liked the trunk as it was shown, also. I don’t want its opening to be enlarged at the expense of rear headroom, price, complexity, or appearance.

agzand
Guest
agzand

I think the easy way is a rear bumper cutout section. They can probably add a couple of inches to the opening.

Kdawg
Guest
Kdawg

Elon Musk: “Only way to get enough rear passenger headroom was to move the rear roof cross-car support beam.”
——–
Just a thought, but what about pushing the support beam for a hatch forward, instead of over the rear passengers heads? It would make for a bigger hatch door & opening, but with strong enough shocks it shouldn’t be an issue. The Model 3 would essentially have a roll-bar between the front & rear seats with a pivot point down the middle w/the back half all being part of the hatch.

Michael S.
Guest
Michael S.

That’s what the Volt does. Rear passengers’ heads are under the rear glass, and the support beam lies directly in front. This allows for adequate headroom AND a rear hatchback. Not as cool and spacious feeling as a huge rear windshield though.

Jsmay311
Guest
Jsmay311

Calling the Volt’s rear headroom “adequate” is quite generous.

It’s enough for me, at 5’10”. But not so for many of my taller friends. They might fit back there, but not comfortably.

philip d
Guest
philip d

I think the point he was trying to make is that in the Volt there is a hatch and your head is still under glass. Sure the Volt’s roofline including the glass could be a couple of inches higher but the fact is it works as a hatch.

The Model 3 has a slightly higher roofline so moving the brace forward would still allow glass overhead which affords an extra few inches of headroom.

MTN Ranger
Guest
MTN Ranger

All this hand wringing about a hatchback is silly. The best selling CARS are sedans:

Toyota Camry
Toyota Corolla
Honda Accord
Nissan Altima
Honda Civic
Ford Fusion
Hyundai Elantra
Chevrolet Cruze
Hyundai Sonata

Hatchbacks are a much smaller group of cars.

Personally having had both types cars, it doesn’t really matter to me.

EV Driver
Guest
EV Driver

Exactly. A hatchback will come eventually, but a good, inexpensive sedan is important to break into the mainstream market.

Kdawg
Guest
Kdawg

If they offered hatchback versions of those cars, they would also sell. For example the Fusion you mention is also sold in a hatchback and I think the split is 50/50.

MTN Ranger
Guest
MTN Ranger

I think you are confusing Fusion with Focus – that is one of the top ten cars that also comes in hatch. The other top nine are currently only sedans.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

“All this hand wringing about a hatchback is silly. The best selling CARS are sedans:”

And one of them listed starts at $35K or have only 215 range. =)

Then again, none of them is as quick as Model 3 in 0-60mph.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

None of them starts at $35K…

Steve Strange
Guest
Steve Strange

Yeah. I have an old car with a trunk. I think it’s just pain stupid. I don’t understand the US market’s acceptance of trunks. Hatchbacks are far more versatile with no real drawbacks. I don’t understand why the Model 3 is so special that it requires a trunk in order to provide rear passengers with headroom. This is not true on other small cars like the Golf.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

@MTN Ranger:

Thanks for posting that list!

Yeah, despite all the comments here, sedans are still much more popular than hatchbacks or liftbacks in the USA.

Personally I’d prefer a hatchback, or a “liftback” like the Model S, but Tesla will likely sell more cars by ignoring the cries for a hatch on the Model ≡, and save that for the Model Y crossover.

Priusmaniac
Guest
Priusmaniac

That would give a problem with a roof rack.
But perhaps the pillar is not needed if you use new high strength glass.
Glass to glass hinge would push that even further while giving new beautiful designs compared to the standard steel transition, steel hinge and steel transition again.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

“But perhaps the pillar is not needed if you use new high strength glass.”

Truly amazing reflection of internet poster lack of engineering understandings…

Perhaps you should go and work for TEsla to give them some of that advice! LOL.

Then again, with my Model 3 reservation, I hope you don’t ruin it. =)

Josh
Guest

It’s a good thought, but it would lose the open view and feel of roominess Tesla was going for in the rear seat.

I think the way the trunk lid opens high might make it easier than some people think to get stuff in and out, compared to a conventional trunk. It is still inferior to hatchback access.

Steven
Guest
Steven

A.) I really don’t want an all glass roof.

B.) If I have to have an all glass roof, I don’t mind a break to allow a proper hatchback.

C.) I want a hatchback, like the S, just smaller.

John
Guest
John

I wish the Model 3 was a hatchback.
I wish the Bolt came with a supercharger network.

No matter which one we choose, it’s going to be a trade-off.

Priusmaniac
Guest
Priusmaniac

I wish a Model 3 with a 90 KWh Model S battery.

No matter which one we choose, it’s going to be a trade-off.

Mister G
Guest
Mister G

At the end of the day, the important trade off is more pollution (ice) or less pollution (BEV).

Robert Weekley
Guest

The Model 3 will have Towing capability! Get Both! Buy a Bolt (Or Lease one) and Tow it behind the Model 3! Now – there you solved the Problem of the Hatch + Supercharger Network!
/Smile Of the Day

John
Guest
John

I have always just removed the wheels of my bike and put them in the back seat. I have a very small car.

Nix
Guest
Nix

A long time ago I owned a BMW 5-Series. It had a small trunk entry too, despite being a fairly large car. It was amazing how many times I found myself frustrated that I couldn’t fit common things like coolers into the small trunk entry.

It is good to hear this has been taken care of. It is one of those small issues that doesn’t need to detract from this car’s release.

Anon
Guest
Anon

Well, time will tell. No one has yet seen the actual “solution” for everyone who has either directly said, or implied they won’t be happy unless it has a large rear access door (hatch), of some kind.

The physical configuration makes or breaks how practical cargo storage and utility in a particular vehicle will be. It’s not just an issue of personal preference. It’s a pragmatic criteria used by many to base the validity of a vehicle purchase.

Hatchbacks are a natural evolution and extension of the more limited trunk, so I hope we don’t take a step backwards with “#tinytrunk”, until Model Y is eventually released…

stikshifter
Guest
stikshifter

Can’t you just put your bicycle in the frunk?

pjwood1
Guest
pjwood1

The trunk does less to knock me out than would Volt-like rear seats. They’re both bad moves. This car is close to 185 inches long. Basically the same length as a Passat Wagon. So, I’m not buyin’ many excuses. Model 3 is supposed to be cab-forward, or at least its firewall (according to MT). That should help reduce A-pillar obstruction as we move up (read me, Volt?), and give rear passengers a bit more room. Of course, in a shorter car with AWD and bio-weapon filtration, the frunk would then be good for magazines, or maybe a laptop?

Murrysville EV
Guest
Murrysville EV

I’m much more interested in fixing that science-project 15″ display hanging on the dashboard.

For being the interior’s centerpiece, it’s awful.

Nathanael
Guest
Nathanael

Interior of Model 3 as displayed was far from final. (For example, there were simply pencil circles instead of cupholders!) Compare the interiors for the prototype Model S and prototype Model X — they were at a similar stage.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

I totally understand the need for a hatch. But I don’t think Model 3 is designed to meet everyone’s need.

It is there to compete against Audi A4 and BMW 3 series. It isn’t there to compete against “practical family haulers”. That is the job of Chevy and Ford and Toyota. Too bad that only Chevy is even coming out with something.

Model 3 is designed from ground up to be a premium car against European entry level luxury cars with the similar option pricing structure (milking you to death).

If you want a practical family hauler, then Model isn’t it.

People just got the idea that Model 3 is practical since Model S was a spanking great premium EV and it was super practical. But in order to cut cost, I don’t think it is designed to be practical, but rather try to compete against A4/3 Series directly, mostly on technology and acceleration.

Priusmaniac
Guest
Priusmaniac

I don’t agree with that FUD and by the way the BMW 3 series has a gran turismo version that is a hatch version of the sedan. If BMW can do it, Tesla can as well.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

Which part is the FUD? That Model 3 is aimed at Audi A4/BMW 3 series?

LOL. There is NO FUD when the Model 3 doesn’t come in hatch version.

Or you mean “fact”… LOL.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

Where’s the FUD? Well, you wrote:

“Model 3 is designed… the similar option pricing structure (milking you to death).”

Not quite sure that qualifies as FUD, but it certainly seems to be a rather biased remark with rather questionable basis in fact.

Now, you’re correct to say that the Model ≡ isn’t aimed at the price range generally described as “affordable”. But neither is it in the “premium” price bracket. It’s somewhere in between those two categories.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

We have all seen the Tesla option structure and its pricing.

I believe you also complained about the amount of $ cost to upgrade in battery range.

Tesla is modeled closely to what Audi and BMW does with their price and option structure. That is classic “staircase to heaven” option structure. It is designed to have an low entry price point to get you in the door and then “milk you to death” up the option tree. That is a why a top of the line model can cost 2x of the base model.

The 2x amount is typically what a “premium” price car segment does just like Audi/BMW for their respective class.

Mister G
Guest
Mister G

I really don’t care if it has a trunk or hatch…I just want a reliable vehicle that will break my oil addiction and help me pollute less.

Nathanael
Guest
Nathanael

I bet they lowered the “lip” at the base of the trunk. That’s the obvious way to do it.

Loboc
Guest
Loboc

The prototype M3’s trunk is pretty much the same as my ELR’s trunk. Except ELR has those intrusive ‘U’-shaped hinges that hit things.

I don’t have an issue with M3’s trunk at all.

TomArt
Guest
TomArt

Well, if Musk wasn’t fanatical about dropping an extra hundredth or two on the drag coefficient, there would be room for passenger heads and a proper trunk/hatch/whatever opening.

I appreciate engineering marvels, but when you sacrifice functionality in order to achieve those ends, then I’m not quite so impressed…makes it less of a marvel…