C40 Mayors Craft New Emissions Ratings, EVs Expected To Benefit

8 months ago by Sebastian Blanco 10

Downtown Portland night scene by Ian Sane. CC 2.0.

Downtown Portland night scene by Ian Sane. CC 2.0.

It’s not exactly a secret that urban centers are prime locations to see the effects of concentrated vehicle emissions. You put a lot of people into a small place with a lot of busy tailpipes and you’re likely to see increased rates of death and dementia. This is one reason why some cities have tried to clean out their downtowns by using congestion charges or limiting the numbers of vehicles allowed in on certain days. The C40 group of mayors has now announced that it is going to introduce a bigger, better method of measuring vehicle emissions.

C40 Cities’ basic idea is that the various governmental emissions standards used around the world are not accurate enough to actually tell people how dirty their cars are. After all, C40 Cities says, the current tests, “only regulate some pollutants and only require vehicles to meet standards in laboratory conditions. Actual emissions on the road have been proven to be up to 15 times greater.” C40 Cities, therefore, is going to create its own global ratings system, give new cars a score based on this real-world rating that is, “based on all of the air pollutants they release during real-world, on-road conditions,” and then share these ratings online. London and Paris will be the first two cities to share their data, due before the end of 2017.

Anne Hidalgo,, the mayor of Paris and chair of C40 Cities, said in a statement that, “For too long, some vehicle manufacturers have been able to hide behind inconsistent regulation and consumer uncertainty about the damage their cars are causing. This announcement is a wake-up call to car companies that they need to act now.” The mayor of London said, the scheme, “will put an end to the smoke and mirrors that have been employed in official emissions tests.”

C40 Cities has not yet explained exactly how the numbers will be crunched, but we can only hope that it’s a true, in-depth well-to-wheels accounting otherwise all electric vehicles will just get the highest rating for having no local tailpipe emissions. While this would make EVs look good, factoring in how both electricity gets generated and how petroleum is drilled and refined should make the disparity between plug-ins and fossil fuels even more stark. After all, this new rating scheme grew out of a meeting that was, “designed to find ways to accelerate the transition to low-emission and electric cars.” The truth can have that effect.

Source: C40

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10 responses to "C40 Mayors Craft New Emissions Ratings, EVs Expected To Benefit"

  1. Mister G says:

    When will humans wake-up and stop driving dirty ICE vehicles?

    1. Nigel says:

      Probably about the same time we stop making wars. Luckily, in the meantime, economics, performance and technology will favor adoption of EV’s

    2. Joshua Burstyn says:

      Sadly for most people the change will only happen when economics dictate it must. This is why carbon taxes may work.

      1. Dav8or says:

        Is there anybody here that actually believes electric cars are better?? Many people that post here say how great EVs are and how they will be taking over any day now, yet… the same people seem to think we should mandate people’s adoption of them. That we should force people to buy them.

        Consumers are clever enough to tell a superior product, but can the average EV enthusiast? I personally think EVs are superior, but in subtle ways, not overt ways. Life with EVs isn’t as bad as many envision now that 200+ mile range EVs are obtainable by many more people.

        The way to sell EVs is person to person, discussion and demonstration, not mandates, or incentives. I’ll take the positive incentive if they are offered, like tax credits, but they are not needed at this point. Negative incentives, like high taxes on whatever really do nothing but make consumers actually hate EVs and the people that promote them.

        Let the damn cars compete on their own!! If the BEV can’t actually compete, FIX THE DAMN CAR so it can!

        1. Ambulator says:

          ICE cars are making the air I breathe poisonous. I see nothing wrong in making people pay to do that, and eventually mandating that they stop.

        2. Michael Will says:

          Replaced our VW Jetta in 2015 with VW e-Golf and our Honda Odyssey in 2016 with a Tesla Model X.

          Electric driving even with the VW eGolf is so much better than the gas car. Smooth, fast acceleration with immediate torque even at low rpm gives you a headstart at every light, gas cars are still revving up behind you while you are gone. No more visits go gas stations, oil change or smog check appointments. Just plug in at night and full in the morning. Temperature of the cabin can be preconditioned from your iphone, while having breakfast or while walking to the car, even when parked in the garage because there are no poisonous exhaust fumes. I would never go back to a gas car, thats like going back from a n iphone to a landline, yeah, cheaper, but… lol no way!

    3. SJC says:

      Lots of people say YOU should buy an EV but when asked when THEY will they change the subject.

  2. Sharkvolt says:

    Here are the major criteria most people use to pick a new car, in no particular order:

    1. cost to purchase.
    2. cost of fuel and upkeep.
    3. looks.
    4. acceleration.
    5. handling.
    6. utilitarian. (towing, luggage, etc.)
    7. status. (coolness, or wow factor)
    8. number of passengers.
    9. greenness.
    10. ease of entry/exit.

    Every new car buyer has certain requirements that are locked in, such as number of passengers, or towing, when they are looking at a new vehicle purchase.

    And, only when BEVs are available that fit all the locked in requirements for each different kind of purchaser, and also aren’t too far off on the other goals, will nearly everyone start buying BEVs and doom ICE vehicles to extinction, or at least to becoming antiques.

    The manufacturers are not about to start building a BEV that costs $10,000 more than the equivalent ICE for each and every category when they will sell hardly any of them and lose a fortune doing so.

    Tesla is making only very specific categories of BEV vehicles to fit in certain segments of the market, until they can get the costs down to where they can hopefully compete on a level with ordinary ICE vehicles. The model 3 is an attempt to make a sporty small sedan at a lower price than previous Teslas, and in larger numbers.

    Gm, with the Bolt is starting in the small crossover segment, and may end up with very good sales, once enough people test drive it.

    All the high end carmakers are bringing out BEVs for all the high end segments in the next few years, and those will all be very likely successful as well.

    The hard job will be to get the costs and size of batteries down low enough to make them cheap enough to replace the cheap ICE cars or trucks that the rest of America drives to work in.

    It WILL happen, but it might take quite a few more years to reach that level.

    1. Michael Will says:

      All secondary cars in a two car family that are sedans today can easily be replaced with a Hyundai Ioniq Electric, 124 miles on a charge, priced well below Bolt and Model 3.

      Also I have seen leases as cheap as $0 down and $70/month for a Fiat 500e, after gas savings that is practically a free car.

  3. Bibou64 says:

    In my city, in france, i am i charge of environment protection. The city is now buying electric vehicles, and the first driver – who is a woman – likes the electric car, a Peugeot partner. She is now a supporter of E.Vs.
    We have to explain, we have to convince, we have to propose test drives…. come on !