BYD Launches First Pure Electric Bus in India


New York Transit's BYD 40-foot Electric Bus

New York Transit’s BYD 40-foot Electric Bus

Last month, the first long-range, all-electric bus from BYD arrived in India.

According to press release, the bus achieves up to 24 hours of service on a single night-time charge.

The bus will be used in Bangalore, India in The Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation fleet, which is the sole public bus transport provider for Bangalore.

Ramalinga Reddy The Karnataka State Minister of Transportation remarked:

“Operating electric buses not only to initialize and support new technologies, shows our respect to the city and urban residents with our social and environmental responsibility.”

Mr. Vishwas, Vice President of BYD India’s distribution partner, Utopia, stated:

“We are very bullish on the prospect of new energy vehicles in India. We look forward to working with BYD to promote the popularization of new energy vehicles.”

Mr. Liu Xueliang, GM of BYD’s Asia-Pacific Group, commented:

“BYD is offering zero-emission, electrified public transportation solutions to the whole world. We are very excited to work with partners like BMTC and Utopia to put India’s first electric bus into operation. It will not only contribute to the new energy vehicle development and application in Karnataka state but the whole of India.”

Bangalore has huge problems with air quality and, according to the press release, the bus fleet there currently emits up to 20% of the city’s total exhaust.  So, it makes sense that the city is experimenting with EVs now.

“Given the difference of the electric price and diesel price, the BYD electric bus is not only zero emission but also has high economic value. Traditional diesel buses consume 0.55 L of diesel per kilometer in India, but by comparison, BYD’s 40 foot all-electric bus only consumes about 1 Kwh electric per kilometer (with no HVAC). The results are that millions in cost savings can be realized in Bangalore.”

The Indian government aims to put in place as many as 6-7 million new energy vehicles by 2020, but realization of that goal probably will not be easy task.

Category: BYD

8 responses to "BYD Launches First Pure Electric Bus in India"
  1. DaveMart says:

    The heat and humidity will give the BYD busses a good work out in terms of their air conditioning power draw.
    Fingers crossed!

    1. Assaf says:

      Actually, Bangalore’s climate is among the mildest and least muggy in India.

      It’s pretty close to perfect EV weather – not too different from, e.g., Fremont California (reminds you of something?) – except that the rainy season is May-October rather than October-April, which means that mid-summer is a bit less hot, and winter is nearly non-existent.

      For sure:
      – Almost no Phoenix-like furnace days
      – Almost no cold rainy days that eat up your battery from the other end
      – No snow/sub-freezing days

      1. DaveMart says:

        Many thanks for the correction.
        I should have checked first I find.

        1. Assaf says:

          No problem… it was nice reminiscing about Bangalore (been there once, spring 1993).

          1. Mark_Manohar says:

            Hello Assaf,
            I to know the your perception you have shared with us, I’m from Banglore too..
            what is your Opinion on buying BYD bus by a private agency like me and run it for public transport? Does it really benefit our business like us. please share your opinion with us. thank you.

  2. ModernMarvelFan says:

    1KM per KWh…

  3. Bill Howland says:

    I wonder why BYD didn’t try harder in the personal vehicle market here in the States? I seem to remember their car had something like a 40 kwh battery so it was the only other maker (besides Tesla of course) that put a decently sized battey in their Bev’s.

    For now, they’re taking Bob Lutz’s approach toward vehicle electrification: Do the people movers first.

    1. DaveMart says:

      I understand that build quality and refinement was not up to a sufficient standard to compete in the US and Europe.
      They probably saw what happened to Coda, and, rightly, decided to improve those aspects first.
      The Qin plug in may be the start of more competitive BYD vehicles.