Brazil EV Study – 100% Electric Fleet in Sao Paulo Would Require 40 Million MWh of Additional Electricity

JAN 15 2014 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 20

A recent study conducted in Sao Paulo, Brazil concludes that if the entire city went electric by 2035, then demand for electricity would increase by 40 million MWh.

As the study suggests, “every increase of 10% electric vehicles in the São Paulo fleet corresponds to an increase of about 2% of the electricity demand,” according to Green Car Congress.

Additionally, every 10% increase in electric vehicles will lead to a reduction in total emissions in Sao Paulo of 1.3%.

Unfortunately, access to the study requires us to pay money, which we’re not going to do, but the summarized findings presented above give us some idea of what would occur if a large metropolis converted fully to electric vehicles.

Source: Green Car Congress

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20 Comments on "Brazil EV Study – 100% Electric Fleet in Sao Paulo Would Require 40 Million MWh of Additional Electricity"

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what’s stops that city from requiring solar panels to offset that need? Sunny Brazil could handle it.

That works just fine at my house.

You beat me to it. This sounds like a job for distributed solar!

“A recent study conducted in Sao Paulo, Brazil concludes that if the entire city went electric by 2035, then demand for electricity would increase by 40 million MWh”
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So 0.00187% of the solar energy that hits the surface of the Earth in 1 day.

20% is the common rule-of-thumb estimate of how much additional electricity will be consumed if the fleet is all-BEV.

Of course, this ignores all kinds of developments, e.g.:

– Both EVs and electricity usage becoming more efficient, so maybe 20% will still be about right, but it’ll be 20% of an overall smaller pie

– Widespread implementation of vehicle-to-grid (which is now already piloted in Maui and on a smaller scale in Japan AFAIK) helps flatten down the overall electricity demand peaks, and recuperate renewable production during solar/wind peaks, that would have otherwise gone to waste.
Thanks to this, a fully-electric fleet with widespread vehicle-to-grid might not require any additional capacity at all.
– Finally, overall to mitigate climate change, people (and Westerners in particular) will need to drive less regardless of vehicle, and use transit/cycle/walk/tele-commute more.

The naive 20% guesstimate doesn’t take any of this into account.

You know what? I wish we’ll live to see the day of a near-100% BEV fleet. Given the above, I’m pretty sure human technological innovation will find a way to accommodate it.

Another development:

the higher demand would make deficiencies more apparent and the increase the incentive of the utilities to improve.
Less waste, more effective power at equal imput.

Brazil has lots of sunlight at its disposal.

Absolutely!

After you have removed all this long brown-green shadow making things.

99% of caes in Brazil are Power with Ethanol from sugarcane. They got Oil free after the embargo of the 70’s.

Which is grown on destroyed forests with lot of chemicals…

And still causes health destroying emission in large cities when using in thousands of tiny, inefficient power plants.

Over 70% of Brazil’s electricity is generated with hydro, so it’s already clean compared to most nations.

I wonder if that takes into account the decrease in electricity used by oil refineries and ethanol distilling?

“…then demand for electricity would increase by 40 million MWh.”

Electricity demand is in units of power, while MWh is a unit of energy. Was this supposed to be “…would increase by 40 million MWh per year”?

Or with electric assist bicycles using 24 kWh/mile, without pedaling, they could get by with the electricity now used to pump fuel.

Meant 24 Wh/mile…no edit button. 🙁

“every increase of 10% electric vehicles in the São Paulo fleet corresponds to an increase of about 2% of the electricity demand,”

Let me finish that sentence:

“and there is more than that capacity available from midnight to 6am every night without the need for additional capacity.”

With a proper TOU pricing plan, they could pull this off with zero generating capacity needed.

It’s only 4.5GW power plants. handful of nukes, no problem. Small price to pay for a huge country like Brazil.

The end game has already been studied for some time now. If all the conventional cars are replaced with electric cars the gas consumption decrease drastically below 10% of the initial consumption, the electric consumption increase by 12 % and the peak demand decrease by 5 % (if cars are V2G equipped, otherwise it remains about the same).