Bosch To Acquire Battery Startup Seeo

SEP 4 2015 BY MARK KANE 5

Seeo DryLyte

Seeo DryLyte

Bosch is in the acquisition process of Seeo (Berkeley Lab solid-state Li-ion battery spinoff). Financial terms remain secret.

The company gained popularity after an investment from Samsung Ventures Investment Corporation in 2014 and is announcing a goal of 400 Wh/kg energy density on the cell level.

“The deal is one of the first in a technology space that has been marked by gloom after the sharp optimism of five years ago. In acquiring Seeo, Bosch—an incumbent that analysts say has long tried to break into advanced batteries—gets a company that has a good chance of success in producing batteries that will follow the current lithium-ion age, in the 2020s and beyond.

Cosmin Laslau, an analyst with Lux Research, told Quartz that Seeo had a setback last year in which it had to switch battery chemistries—a pivot that was seen as slowing its way into the market. In addition, its battery must be operated at 80 degrees Centigrade, which is extremely hot and is another barrier to the market.”

Early this year, Seeo was also awarded a contract from USABC to deliver battery modules with its nanostructured solid polymer electrolyte DryLyte for tests. 1.6 kWh modules use cells with 220 Wh/kg.

350 Wh/kg cells announced in 2014 aren’t yet available it seems, but maybe Bosch saw prototypes, making it decide to invest.

Source: Quartz via Green Car Congress

Categories: Battery Tech

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5 Comments on "Bosch To Acquire Battery Startup Seeo"

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Alaa
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Alaa

If we factor in the energy needed to raise the temperature to 80 degrees c then the energy density they claim here will drop!

Chip
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Chip

“Seeo had a setback last year in which it had to switch battery chemistry — a pivot that was seen as slowing its way into the market. In addition, its battery must be operated at 80 degrees Centigrade, which is extremely hot and is another barrier to the market”.

Hmmm, a curious case.
I wonder if Bosch swooped to buy their IP cheap after the setback.
If anyone produces a working cell with a solid electrolyte, Bosch would will now own some early patents in case of litigation about who invented what.

jmac
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jmac

There’s a pretty good article over at Green Car Congress by Cosmin Laslau at Lux Research about See-o and other solid state battery start-ups like Sakti3, etc.

An informative graph shows 17 different solid state battery companies in various stages of development.

Innovation Grid of interviewed solid-state battery developers.
Image003

http://www.greencarcongress.com/2015/08/20150828-lux.html#more

Someone out there
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Someone out there

Maybe Bosch thinks it has the technology or knowledge to solve the problem Seeo has. I doubt Bosch are throwing away their money here.

Jouni Valkonen
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Jouni Valkonen

When people are making investments on technology, they do not evaluate the technology, but what kind of people are developing the technology. It therefore seems that Bosch saw Seeo researches doing high quality basic research and Bosch wanted that basic research project to continue financed.

The same logic was with Envia batteries, and it is good to read the recent book on Envia, ‘Powering the Future’. They did honest basic research that seemed promising but they stumbled upon an engineering problem that they could not solve. Therefore Envia failed in grand scale.

If you want to bet against Seoo odds are more than 99:1 that Seoo will fail in their basic research project.