Next-Gen BMW X5 Plug-In Hybrid To Get Up To 30 Miles Electric Range

BMW iPerformance NYIAS

MAY 24 2018 BY MARK KANE 18

BMW X5 xDrive40e is going to get a next-generation version called X5 xDrive45e with more power and range.

BMWBlog heats up the rumors and expectations about the new plug-in hybrid X5 that will be based on the 5th generation X5 (weeks away from its premier). However, the plug-in hybrid probably will enter the market in 2019.

BMW X5 xDrive40e

“That’s set to happen next month, with the production of the G05 X5 to kick off later this year. The new car will make the most of a new chassis built atop the CLAR architecture, as we’ve been saying for quite some time now. The exterior design changes as well as those done inside will definitely mark a new chapter in BMW’s history.”

It’s been quite some time since the X5 PHEV entered the market. In the U.S., more than 14,000 were sold since late 2015 and several hundred are now being sold every month.

Read Also – BMW iX3 Debuts With 70-kWh Battery, 249-Mile Range

The new BMW X5 xDrive45e should get a higher capacity battery, like the i3 and i8 did, which when combined with lower overall weight of the car, could result in up to 30 miles (48 km) of range – currently it’s just 13 miles (21 km) EPA using a 9.2 kWh battery. However, we believe that the new range will be above 20 miles.

The new 2L petrol engine is to be rated at over 250 hp and system output is expected at 390 hp and over 500 Nm of torque.

The powertrain is to be shared with the 740e plug-in hybrid – the new one will be named 745e.

Source: BMWBlog

Categories: BMW

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

18 Comments on "Next-Gen BMW X5 Plug-In Hybrid To Get Up To 30 Miles Electric Range"

newest oldest most voted
William L

BMW will probably say they are the most advanced in battery technology, they are able to increase the EV range 100%. Fine print from 13 miles to 26 miles (actually driving range 20)…. lame

tester

I mean… It would be pretty pathetic if a new generation came out and the range *didn’t* increase!

William L

You’ll be surprised. The Best or Nothing company second gen Smart is 4 miles less than the previous version on EPA rating.

John

You’re pretty witty, William L- love it!!

PHEVfan

My understanding is that in 2020 all PHEVs will have to be 50km (31 miles) in order to sell in Europe. I don’t see them offering anything less in 2019 just to change it again the following year. Unless there is a difference between the X5 they sell there and in the US.

Chris S

As far as I know all X5 are imported from the US.

John Doe

BMW makes most X5s in the BMW Spartanburg plant in the US, and export it all over the world.

There are some other assembly facilities around the world for the latest model (but a lot of the parts come from the US factory or the suppliers that is located around the US factory). Rules, taxes and regulations are part of the reason. They are normally assembled in larger prefabricated modules.

How a car may be set up depends on what the marked want. In general they prefer a stiffer and more firm ride in Europe.

All the X5s that is ordered armoured are modified in BMWs Toluca plant in Mexico.

They will have to increase the EV range, to be able to sell in Europe. Since they can not use the old range standard, batteries have to be larger, more energy dense or both.

CU

Chinamandates 50 km for a PHEV and less than 2 L……

David Murray

I have a hard time recommending this car to people because of the short range. Admittedly, a lot of people balk at the 25 miles in the Prius Prime, but now that I have one in my little EV fleet, I can honestly say the 25 mile range is surprisingly capable. It gets me almost an hour of in-city driving, which is nothing to laugh at. Granted, highway driving is about 25 minutes, or even less at higher speeds. But if BMW can get 25 miles into an SUV that’s really a great starting point.

Nick

After the Tesla model X, 25 miles in an SUV isn’t really a starting point.

Prad Bitt

Keeping building hybrids is a way to delay massive adoption of good BEVs. It is even more complex and expensive than a normal ICE, and if people still buy them, it will give an incentive to the car makers to NOT convert their ICE facilities to electrics only.

The only reason we buy hybrids is the missing range from the hard-to-find lame EVs they offer, while we all know they could be eating Tesla’s lunch if they actually started the real competition.
Let’s help them make a choice and stop buying hybrids.
Go for the full EV now.

ffbj

I wonder how the administrations new target, imported autos, will effect the industry. Under the auspices of economic security they will attempt to, and probably succeed at, raising tariffs on imported autos.
Collusion with Big Legacy Auto? You Betcha!
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/24/wilbur-ross-on-auto-import-probe-economic-security-is-military-security.html

John

From a company that makes fake car sounds and thinks 15 miles of electric range is acceptable, not impressed.

jim

I own one. It is uprising how often I take short all electric trips. I average about 40 mpg–pretty good for a big fast SUV. If they hit 31miles, since many people plug in during the day, 100% Electric days will be common.

JimGord

Poopy all-electric range of 20 miles. Come back when it has 50 miles

fasterthanonecanimagine

Am I correct, that this would just add about 40 kg in battery weight? And that the additional cost for such a larger battery would just be about 2000 $?

Goaterguy

That will be by 2031 when it will be close to the EV range of the Volt in 2011…

fasterthanonecanimagine

Just discovered the edit function :-))
Thanks !