BMW i8 Wait Times Extend To Over One Year


BMW i8

BMW i8

BMW i8

BMW i8

If you order a BMW i8 today, you won’t receive it until around this time next year.

According to BMW CEO North America, Ludwig Willisch, the wait time for a U.S. i8 order is approximately one year.  That’s too long, says Willisch, so actions will be taken (at the expense of the BMW i3), to shorten i8 wait times:

 “BMW will get 50 percent more i8 plug-in hybrids — 1,000-plus cars — in the U.S. this year than in 2014, but that still won’t be enough to fill the order bank.”

“The wait for an i8, with a list price of $137,450, including shipping, is about a year, said Ludwig Willisch, CEO of BMW of North America. BMW has said it will make fewer of the smaller i3 electric vehicles this year so that it can increase i8 production. But those cars won’t make it to the U.S. until October.”

That’s according to Automotive News.

Willisch commented on i3 sales too:

“Willisch said sales of the i3 are also exceeding targets and that he doesn’t expect falling gasoline prices to slow sales. BMW expects to sell about 1,000 i3s a month in 2015 in the U.S., Willisch said. Last year, BMW sold 6,092 i3s and 555 i8s here. The i3 went on sale last spring, and i8 sales began in August.”

Source: Automotive News

Category: BMW


12 responses to "BMW i8 Wait Times Extend To Over One Year"
  1. Bert says:

    “BMW has said it will make fewer of the smaller i3 electric vehicles this year so that it can increase i8 production.”

    Is BMW battery constrained?

    1. Mikael says:

      The talk has mostly been about the carbon fiber. But since the i3 sells in the 2k+ and the i8 in 400-ish per month the sales numbers shouldn’t look all that different even if they would increase the i8 by 50% or even 100% and take that from the i3’s material quota.

  2. Forever green says:

    I think when they (BMW) don’t meet their sales projections for 2015, they will say it was because they had to cut back production of the BMW i3 to work on back orders for the BMW i8. There are no battery constraints.

  3. Yoda says:

    I believe BMW is carbon fiber restrained not battery restrained…

    1. Disappointed says:

      Not battery constrained

      Not carbon fiber constrained

      Not Global EV demand constrained

      Not constained by i8 demands for assembly line space

      I believe that this is simply the latest face saving excuse for slowing down i3 production. BMW is facing Inventory overload and decreasing demand.
      Currently their are 2,300 i3s for sale in the US.
      In Germany in January the year over year sales for the i3 were down 40%, while demand for electric cars was up 84%.

      1. krona2k says:

        Hopefully they means they will lower the price then. They already said they didn’t sell it for a loss from day one. In the meantime production costs should have come down so they should be able to afford a price cut if they every feel like they want to stimulate demand.

  4. sven says:

    “BMW expects to sell about 1,000 i3s a month in 2015 in the U.S., Willisch said.”

    So about 12,000 i3 sales in 2015. That’s less that the number of Plug-in Prius’ sold in 2014, and Toyota wasn’t really trying during the second half of the year. This does not bode well for the growth rate of US EV sales in 2015. 🙁

  5. What would you pay to drive a BMW i8 for an hour?

    1. mr. m says:


      1. Open-Mind says:

        Same here. But I would pay twice that to drive a P85D for an hour.

  6. Omar Sultan says:

    I am not sure there needs to be any conspiracy about this — they make more money on the i8 than the i3 and its the “it” car right now, so better to snag as much of that money as possible before folks’ interest wanes and something else is the new “it” car.