BMW And SCHERM To Launch 40-Ton Electric Truck Pilot Project In Munich

APR 7 2015 BY MARK KANE 8

Terberg Type YT202-EV

Terberg Type YT202-EV

The Terberg Type YT202-EV, 4x2. The BMW Group and Scherm Group will deploy a vehicle of this type in Munich from mid-2015 on

The Terberg Type YT202-EV, 4×2. The BMW Group and Scherm Group will deploy a vehicle of this type in Munich from mid-2015 on

BMW Group announced a pilot project in which it will become the first in Germany to use a 40-ton electric truck for transport on city roads.

Project will be launched with SCHERM Group in Munich this summer for one year.

Dutch truck Terberg YT202-EV will transport materials between the logistics company SCHERM Group and the BMW Group Plant Munich eight times a day, covering a distance of almost two kilometers one-way.

“The BMW Group and SCHERM Group are investing a six-figure amount in the pilot project, which will initially span one year. If the vehicle proves itself in everyday driving conditions, both partners will seek to expand the project.”

Hermann Bohrer, director of BMW Group Plant Munich said:

“Just under two years ago, our BMW i brand put sustainable mobility on the road. This pure electric truck signals that we are constantly working on innovative solutions and tackling logistics challenges. We are therefore delighted with the cooperation with SCHERM.”

Rainer Zoellner, “e-truck” project manager at SCHERM Group said:

“After a long search, we have found an electro-mobility solution for the transport sector. We are certain to gain valuable experience with the BMW Group from this pilot project.”

YT202-EV description:

“In most applications the YT202-EV can operate for a full shift of 9 to 10 hours and then be recharged in 2 to 4 hours. The lithium iron phosphate battery is optimised for traction applications and has a life of several thousand charge/discharge cycles. The 202 kW electric motor drives an Allison 3000 series gearbox, which is also used in conventional YT tractors.”

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8 Comments on "BMW And SCHERM To Launch 40-Ton Electric Truck Pilot Project In Munich"

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With Tesla batteries, 40 ton electric truck could have 500 km range, 20 minute fast charging to 50 %. 60 min full charge and cycle life around 2000 or total lifetime range about 1 000 000 km.

Basically 40 ton electric truck could drive 500 km, then driver could stop for 20 minute coffee break and continue for another 250 km. That is almost 10 hours of continuous driving without lunch break for the driver!

500 km range requires about four or five Model S batteries, or about 340-440 kWh battery pack that has weight about 2000 kg. or about 1000 kg payload penalty compared to equivalent Diesel drivetrain.

And, if the Tesla battery cost is about 200 dollars per kWh, then 400 kWh battery pack has cost about 80 kilodollars, or about 8 dollars per 100 km.

If equivalent Diesel truck consumes about 30 liters of Diesel per 100 km, then the fuel costs are about 20 dollars per 100 km. Therefore, economics are indeed there. But of course this requires lots of innovation and investments on R&D.

No one has ever tried, what would happen if it is build an electric truck that has high energy density, high power density, high cycle life and low cost Tesla batteries installed.

Don’t forget that the cost of fuel is zero. This will change the world since transporting good will cost much less than using oil.

why do you think cost of fuel is zero?

the marginal cost of solar power is zero.

Ha. The marginal cost simply becomes financing charges. Hardly zero for a 25+ year infrastructure investment.

Actually, as we need to have enough solar power on winter and evening and mornings, then it also means that we have at noon huge over production of solar power. Therefore at noon, the cost of electricity plunges to zero. And if trucks are charged at noon, then also the charging cost is zero. This is the magic of zero marginal cost.

I went to the manufacturer’s website and it says this thing is only a Yard Tractor.

So that explains why they don’t mention battery size since the thing isn’t going anywhere anyway.