Bjørn Conducts Range Test On Tesla Model S P100D

OCT 8 2018 BY STEVEN LOVEDAY 14

Hmm … Bjørn Nyland asks, is the Tesla Model S P100DL range is better than the Hyundai Kona Electric?

Interestingly, it’s almost as if Nyland changed the premise of his video after the fact. The title provided by Bjørn on his YouTube channel is simple, “Model S P100DL range test.” But, the lead image asks us the above question. In Bjørn’s own words, he specifically asks, “Hyundai Kona Electric Better Than Tesla Model S P100DL.” We honestly have no clue why the featured image title doesn’t match the YouTube video title, but as soon as you dial into the video, you’ll realize very quickly that Nyland is comparing the range of the two cars.

Even more interestingly, as Bjørn is driving the car, he admits that there must be something weird going on with this particular Model S P100D’s alignment. In addition, the weather is bad, the roads are wet, the temps are low, and the car is wearing 21-inch tires. Still, Nyland likes to share everything regardless of the situation. He knows full well that he is going to get undue flack from the Tesla community, but he could really care less.

In the end, he jokes that the Kona Electric does, in fact, have better real-world range than the Model S. Bjørn goes on to explain that the situation may have been very unfair and that Tesla fanboys are going to pitch a fit about it due to the above-mentioned situational elements. We can’t imagine that Tesla fans would call Bjørn out for this test … haha we jest, as we’re laughing out loud. We can’t wait for the comments on this one. Should we just turn them off now to save the hassle?

In all honesty, the point here is that Bjørn takes the time to test all of these electric cars in whatever conditions and regardless of the situation to keep us informed. Yes, make no mistake that in the real world, people will be driving these cars in different situations, varying speeds, different states of charge, different weather, contrasting states of repair, etc. etc. We still give Nyland tons of kudos for making these range videos and comparisons available. Now, do what you may with the information, but don’t attack IEV or Nyland in the comment section, since all information was fairly disclosed.

HYUNDAI KONA

Geneva

Hyundai Kona Electric
20 photos
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New York

Hyundai Kona Electric
21 photos
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TESLA MODEL S

19 photos
Tesla Model S Tesla Model S Tesla Model S Tesla Model S Tesla Model S Michael's Tesla Model S Tesla Model S Tesla Model S, Image Credit: Tesla Tesla Model S Tesla Model S, Image Credit: Tesla Tesla Mode Tesla Model S Tesla Model S Tesla Model S Tesla Model S P100D Inside the Tesla Model S, Image Credit: Tesla Tesla Model S Interior, Image Credit: Tesla Inside a Tesla Model S

Categories: Hyundai, Tesla

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14 Comments on "Bjørn Conducts Range Test On Tesla Model S P100D"

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Rick

What’s strange to me is that no one compares the Model S 100D with 19″ slipstreams to other EVs on the market… like Kona, Niro, I-Pace… how about a range test at 120 km/h?

Another Euro point of view

Apparently Bjorn says that 90km/h corresponds to many people driving habits. As this is in Norway I take it many people drive 90 km/h in Norway which if true would be one of the many reasons of the success of EVs in Norway. This as opposed to many countries were speed limits are 130 km/h and people would often drive 140 km/h. I personally consider the very few speeding tickets I get on near empty dry highways while driving a bit above speed limit (+/-140km/h) as normal expenses like tire wear etc..(about EUR 100 per year and am glad to pay) Anyway range at 90 km/h may be relevant only for the tiny Norwegian population. Better than nothing I guess, Take 40% off the 90 km/h range and you have the 120 km/h range ??

Beat Brunner

Fuel/Energy consumption is vastly reduced at 90 km/h compared to 140 km/h and even to 120 km/h, and the door-to-door travel time is not that much increased. Additionally, driving at 90 km/h is way less stressful and more relaxing than driving at 140 km/h. Finally, much more cars fit on a road at lower speeds. And finally consequences of accidents are way less dramatic. Frankly, having lower speed-limits is not stupid at all.

Rick

Still none of you have answered the question: Why not the 100D with 19″ slipstreams ? Sounds like some people are afraid of the results… And you sound like the slow people who block others because they think driving slowly is better. It isn’t and in many places people drive 120 km/h to 130 km/h, more than that is illegal in most countries. Let’s not exaggerate speeds… 140 km/h is not realistic. I’ve driven in Austria, Germany, Netherlands, France, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, UK, Spain, Portugal, Canada, South Africa, USA and some others I can’t remember and on highways I could almost always drive at 120 km/h and higher. Norway is an exception and of course people who think it’s better to drive slowly.

Rolando

On the main freeways in Norway, Bjorn could drive faster like 120 kph, the main reason for 90 kph constant is (according to Bjorn) that the consumption then is best matching the mix of city driving and short highways stints at 130 kph of the combined WLTP cycle.

Alex

You (he Bjorn) might be right about using that speed. But range in the city is more or less irrelevant, range at highway speeds is the main limitation of EVs when it comes to limited range.
Consumption is still important as electricity is not cheap, but as for range test I think it would be more useful to use “appropriate” speeds.

Rick

Exactly! I’m going to do a 1’900 km road trip using superchargers, driving through Switzerland (120 km/h), France (130 km/h), Spain (120 km/h) and Portugal (120 km/h). Going to set EAP to the speed limit in each country, not messing around behind trucks at 90 km/h. I’m interested in knowing how does the competition do at those speeds compared to a Model S 100D with 19″ slipstreams. Guess some people are afraid of the results…

Rick

What the EV enthusiasts also don’t realise is that most people are going to drive at the same speed they drive their fossils: close to the speed limit or a bit higher… These tests are not doing any favours to EV adoption as they show the range to be artificially higher than it really is. Then when people buy the Kona and realise its range is lower at 120 km/h, they won’t be very happy to have been misled by people who tested them at 90 km/h… at least I tried to get the truth out…

Another Euro point of view

Exactly.

groingo

Well, Uncle Bjorn, loved your wheel coment, couldn’t agree more, your a crazy man!
Keep up the good work!

Rolando

The most angry comments came from the ‘political correctness police’ , because Bjorn’s remark 19″ rims are ‘homo’ wheels and most people in NO are using the 21″ anyway.
So anger was not pouring from the Tesla community about only achieving 500km @ 90kph – same 500km range like Kona on the same road 2 month earlier and Niro in Korea at 90 kph also reaching 500 km.

And real world driving is not always during perfect weather, so the Kona at +20C compared with a S-P100D at +13C , is not that much of a difference.

Alex

I doubt temperature plays a big difference in this case. This was a test done all at once or close. If in the first minutes battery was a bit colder than ideal, after a few minutes I’m sure battery pack was at the right temperature, 13 degrees is not very radical.

antrik

Just looking at the EPA MPGe values for city vs. highway driving, it’s pretty clear that the Kona gains an efficiency advantage at slower speeds… Still seems surprising though that the advantage would be this large.

(PS. disclosure of the unfavourable conditions doesn’t really excuse such a click-baity splash image 🙂 )

Rick

That’s why he drives the non-Tesla EVs slowly, to make them look better.