Bill in Utah Seeks to Ease Charging Station Installs by Eliminating Utility Barrier

DEC 1 2013 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 3

A bill unveiled a week or so ago in Utah will allow all who install charging stations within the state to not be under the scrutiny that a utility would.

LEAF in Utah

LEAF in Utah

This means that charging stations won’t fall under the regulatory boundaries of the state’s Public Service Commission.

Though it may seem like a minor move, those in the know see this as hugely beneficial for electric vehicles, as businesses and organizations will no longer have to worry about the utility company regulations commonly associated with charger installs within the state.

For businesses, organizations and city governments, installing a charging station will no longer carry with it all the red tape.

According to Deseret News, representative Patrice Arent, D-Millcreek, “told members of the Public Utilities and Technology Interim Committee that her measure would set in place assurances that someone providing a plug-in station for electric vehicles and being compensated would not run afoul of the state’s utility regulator.”

Source: Deseret News

Categories: Charging

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3 Comments on "Bill in Utah Seeks to Ease Charging Station Installs by Eliminating Utility Barrier"

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Dr. Kenneth Noisewater
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Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

Being able to charge per kWh would be a big win. Carveouts for charging station operators should be done, though I would bet doing so would come with a requirement to price in some sort of ‘gas tax’ into that electricity, along with restrictions to only supplying power for EVs.

If such a tax were structured so that it would cost as much per ‘gallon’ as the tax on a gallon of gas run at the fleet average, it wouldn’t bother me much. So say the average total gas tax is $0.50 and the average MPG is 25, and there’s 33.6kWh per gallon of gas, the tax on a charging-station delivered kWh would be:

(0.5/25) / 33.6 = $0.0005/kWh delivered.

Dr. Kenneth Noisewater
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Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

Hrm, my math’s a bit optimistic.. That should be 0.5/33.6 = $0.015/kWh in tax. Still, considering a retail kWh would likely run about $0.30-0.50 with a minimum charge (say $2) that’s not terribly bad.

sven
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sven

“A bill unveiled a week or so ago in Utah will allow all how install charging stations within the state to not be under the scrutiny that a utility would.”

You might want to rework the opening sentence. 😉