Autocar Tests 64-kWh Hyundai Kona Electric: Offers Verdict

SEP 27 2018 BY VANJA KLJAIC 24

For Autocar, the Kona Electric is a ground-breaking electric car.

The success story of Hyundai has been one of the most compelling events in motoring history. Rising from the manufacturer of cheap and not-so-appealing cars to one of the biggest and most lucrative carmakers has been stellar.

The recent introduction of first all-electric models from the South Korean carmaker further solidifies the company on the automotive map of the world. With almost all recent test drives coming out positive for the Kona, we’re even more inclined to consider it as one of the best electric crossovers on the market today. However, it always makes sense to learn what the experts think.

Recently, Autocar thoroughly tested the Hyundai Kona electric. According to the site, the Kona Electric is claimed to rewrite the range versus cost equation that has dogged the early EV debate.

Ground-breaking, high-spec electric car offers 300 miles of range for less than £32,000

Hence, with the Kona, you get both a price-point appealing entry-level EV, but you get the range you need, too.

For just under £32,000, this 64kWh model promises a maximum potential range of 300 miles on official test cycles, all wrapped in an on-trend crossover bodyshape. On the fastest charge, its battery can go from 0-80% charge in 54 minutes. It’s worth noting, too, that lower-range, lower-cost versions are available.

There are many advantages to the Kona. This is especially true when it comes to the driving experience, materials, design and more, where Kona delivers a decently polished performance aspect, all without breaking the bank. Furthermore, the Kona brings a relatively affordable range, dramatically widening the pool of potential customers whos lives could be bettered by an entrance of an all-electric crossover.

Please find the full Autocar review (teaser, Kona Electric gets 4 out of 5 stars) right here. Enjoy!

Hyundai Kona Electric
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Categories: Hyundai, Test Drives

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24 Comments on "Autocar Tests 64-kWh Hyundai Kona Electric: Offers Verdict"

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Nonbiker

The best EV to date hands down..

reader

No love for Niro ?

antrik

The best at this price point. I don’t think anyone would seriously claim it’s the best in absolute terms?…

Bustya

I would much rather have 3 Konas than 1 Model S.

Chris O

…in its price class. I doubt many people will prefer if over a Model 3 at the same money and when that $35K Model 3 arrives I suspect it will shake up the price class Kona operates in.

dan

A 35k model 3 will arrive when the economics of batteries allow it to be profitable. If the economics are profitable, every manufacturer will have a $35k 200 mile EV. The only difference is that other manufacturers aren’t offering something that cannot exist yet. There is a reason why the SEC is investigating Musk for fraud.

antrik

Interesting world you are living in, where no innovative company every has any advantage over others…

Nate

A lot of people prefer a cuv with the large cargo opening and higher driving position. To each their own. I think all automakers including Tesla ought to have an EV like this by now. Small cuv is a hot segment.

Dan F.

I like the white roof with contrasting body color. Nissan sells the Leaf with a white body and BLACK roof. Not too swift for parking in the sun.

Gabriel Rheault

weirdly in canada, the roof is the same color of the car, so the second tone is coming only from the back/side

Viking79

Nice, much like the Bolt EV with faster charging and better safety features. Also, more available in Europe where hatchbacks sell well.

theflew

But more pedestrian performance than the Bolt.

Ricardo

Not sports cars either of them. If the Bolt reaches 100 kmh a second faster that’s totally irrelevant in European markets

Viking79

They have same power rating and pretty similar size and weight…

Miggy

But the GM Bolt is not available in RHD.

Ricardo

Also better looking. I think most Europeans would strongly dislike the Bolt. The Volt/Ampera was slightly different.

antrik

Really? My impression was that the styling of the Bolt would actually appeal to Europeans more than to Americans…

rey

The Kona is a good BEV, now can Hyundai make 500,000 of them annually? the demand is there, at a price point of $35,000.

Speculawyer

When will it be available on the US market?

antrik

Late this year apparently, or maybe early next… In what numbers, is the more important question.

Tom

…in selected states, in limited quantity.

Seven Electrics

Good for you, Hyundai! This car is a tour de force.

Ty Rua

10 month waiting list in the UK. A huge and worthy success for Hyundai.

JoeS.
Another electric car review that ignores the nuances of driving electric, other than the usual of the reviewer being gobsmacked by the electric car’s acceleration. Specific items missing from this review are: 1. What regeneration options are there? Is there also a zero-regen setting? 2. Can the car come to a complete stop using regeneration (i.e., one-pedal driving)? 3. Is there a regen paddle and is it simply a switch or does it provide the ability to modulate regen? 4. Can creep be enabled/disabled? 5. What is its maximum deceleration rate using regen? 6. How about some standardized energy-consumption figures in terms of Wh/mile? 7. Can charging current be adjusted from within the car (maximum/minimum at what voltages)? 8. Can charging times be controlled from within the car? 9. Can the maximum charging State of Charge be set and what range of that is offered? 10. What type of graphics are employed to display the car’s energy utilization? 11. What variables are considered in the car’s Range Remaining algorithm? 12. Tester’s experience with the car’s Range Remaining predictions (and tracking) during ‘normal’ driving? 13. A discussion of the car’s battery, power electronics, and motor thermal management systems? Finally, for any… Read more »