Audi Promises 310-Mile E-Tron Will Be A “Volume Model”

Audi e-tron prototype in camo

MAR 26 2018 BY STEVEN LOVEDAY 25

Audi is now taking orders for its rather expensive upcoming E-tron in Europe, and the company says the game-changer will be a “volume model.”

While there was some early speculation that the all-electric Audi E-tron might beat the Jaguar I-Pace to market, we now know that this isn’t the case. Nonetheless, Audi is still aiming for 2018 production, with first deliveries in 2019. Marketing boss Bran Schot commented:

“The E-tron will be a game-changer for Audi. It’s our first electric model, and it’s going to be a volume model.”

Read Also: AUDI E-TRON PROTOTYPES SHOW UP IN GENEVA

Audi E-Tron

The automaker is providing the impression that it was waiting for some necessary advancements to fall into place. Sales and marketing boss for the company, Dietmar Voggenreiter shared that battery tech is now where it needs to be and charging infrastructure is beginning to grow more quickly.

However, Audi has made it clear that it will not be independently focusing on charging points. Voggenreiter said:

“A 400-500km range must be possible and we must have a fast charging infrastructure. Both things are coming in 2018. The battery energy density is there and there’s already a lot of charging infrastructure in Europe, the US and Asia.”

“It’s not our job to invest in charging points. We’re pushing and organising this, though, and working with our partners on it.”

“No cars, no infrastructure, but in the next two years there will be lots of investments.”

He reminded that Audi (and Volkswagen Group as a whole) is working with Ford, Daimler, and BMW to assure that a fast-charging network is available. The exec explained that there has really been no need to push the situation since there haven’t been enough electric vehicles on the road to cause a huge need … yet.

Audi has plans to test the 250 prototypes for an extended period of time before revealing a production version. Following that, the vehicle will launch progressively, beginning in Europe. The automaker then has plans to follow the E-tron with 20 electrified models (half of which will be BEVs) by 2025. The SUV is first for obvious reasons, however. Voggenreiter continued:

“A lot of customers have been asking when we’ll bring this car to market. There’s certainly demand in the premium segment; it’s the right product. It’s a real SUV, with Audi design language.”

Audi is not ready to discuss actual production or sales goals, though its test market suggests that demand is in the “double-digit thousands.”

Source: Autocar

Audi e-tron prototype
26 photos
Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi E-Tron Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-tron prototype Audi e-Tron Quattro Audi e-Tron Quattro Audi E-Tron Spy Photo Audi e-Tron Quattro Audi E-Tron Audi E-Tron Spy Photo

Categories: Audi

Tags:

Leave a Reply

25 Comments on "Audi Promises 310-Mile E-Tron Will Be A “Volume Model”"

newest oldest most voted
John Doe

This will sell well in Norway.
Ski box, hitch and so on.
Since it will be made in a volume factory, supply should be no problem. They have a huge dealer network, so logistics should be no problem either.
How demand will be world wide, for such a pricy model depends on many factors.
Fewer expensive cars are sold then cheaper. I’m sure they will have problems selling as many as Nissan does with the LEAF. They do have an increasing numbers of preorders though.

If they don’t succeed, they may slide their release timetable for other EVs, or use factories designed for lower volumes.
We need volume production of EVs, to make a real impact.

Miggy

AUDI PROMISES 500km E-TRON WILL BE A “VOLUME MODEL”

RabidTeslaPsycho

No way they exceed R8 Etron production.

(⌐■_■) Trollnonymous

“He reminded that Audi (and Volkswagen Group as a whole) is working with Ford, Daimler, and BMW to assure that a fast-charging network is available. The exec explained that there has really been no need to push the situation since there haven’t been enough electric vehicles on the road to cause a huge need”

They must not have the Free to charge stuff like we have here in the states.
They always clog the chargers.

Free charging SUCKS!

F150 Brian

You call it pricy, and I believe you are in the US.
So what is the US pricing?

And please don’t quote the price in some other country – we know that has little bearing on US pricing.

dan

Probably $60k-$70k to start. About where the iX3 and iPace will start give or take a few k.

Hans Blix

Exactly. Converting the price from euros (provably in germany) incl. 19% VAT into USD price, which are without VAT and in general car prices in the US are lower than in europe…
I wonder if the same „mistake“ would be made with a certain manufacturer… I dont really wonder I have to say. This car will be priced below 80k $ in the US my estimate.

Bert

John Doe said: “Since it will be made in a volume factory, supply should be no problem.”

I think the biggest problem will be the batteries: how many can they buy from suppliers, which quality and which price.

Vexar

That is the name of the tune, Bert. I am glad to see more and more people getting that auto manufacturers aren’t serious about electrification until they are serious about batteries. I mean, it’s not like steel, aluminium, glass, and plastic are the supply issue here.

John Doe

LG, Samsung, CATL and others are building battery factories in Europe. The VW group (which Audi is a part of) have ordered batteries from these 3 companies.
They build for the demand. They have ordered batteries for billions…
Batteries are a commodity, made to the specs the customers want.

CDAVIS

Audi’s Voggenreiter said:
“It’s not our job to invest in charging points. We’re pushing and organising this, though, and working with our partners on it.”
————-

That’s the overall VW Group position.

Voggenreiter should drive a non-Tesla BEV round-trip from one end of Germany to the other then do it again in a Tesla. Each VW Group executive should do the same.

I doubt any of the VW Group executives have ever driven further than 100km in a non-hybrid BEV. So for them the topic of charging is an abstraction that they have no first hand understanding of the real world importance (driver user experience wise) of having access to a convenient & reliable supercharging network for those occasional long distance trips.

eject

But they are right. Charging should be universal and not attached to a car manufacturer.
There are already third parties providing charging networks such as ecotricity and fastned. Shell is getting into providing chargers on its own and in conjunction with the Ionity charging network. The more players there are the better it will be for the customers. This is the only way to establish market prices for charging.

F150 Brian

+1

The Tesla Supercharger advantage is a short term advantage and not worth replicating per manufacturer.

CDAVIS

@eject said: “But they are right. Charging should be universal and not attached to a car manufacturer…”
————

In a perfect world I agree.

I’m all for a consortium of traditional car makers working together to promote a “universal” supercharger network.

But those efforts are a low priority for the traditional car makers because (in my opinion) the car maker executives don’t individually have firsthand knowledge (their own butt in the seat) of the user experience of driving a BEV sans access to a convenient & reliable superchaing network for those occasional long distance trips.

I strongly believe the traditional car makers are making a huge mistake allowing Tesla to get ahead of them on charging network “user experience”. It gives Tesla a huge advantage that the traditional car makers will pay for in addition lost market share to Tesla.

Tesla went the route of building out their own charging network because Tesla did not want the an important part of the Tesla BEV user experience subordinated to the schedule of others building out the charging network.

eject

Obviously they do have some experience. One of them lead to the conclusion that 150kW charging is pathetic and not sufficient for recharging a car doing long range travel. That is why they aimed higher with the 350kW. Adding more than 100km in 5 minutes allows you to reach you destination with hardly more then a cigarette brake. (Yeah, I know those are sort of out of fashion in the US)

John Doe

That will not be a problem. High speed chargers are being installed in every gas station a long the Autobahn.

CDspeed

I really like the Audi e-tron, and I’m not worried about the Level 3 infrastructure for it, or the I-pace. Why, because of Tesla, I remember when I first looked at the Model S in 2012 the Supercharger network was only talk. I also remember talking to people who wanted a Tesla but passed on it because the Supercharger network was nonexistent at the time. Now in just six years the Tesla Supercharger network is the best Level 3 network out there. Tesla isn’t as big of a company, and they’ve shown it can be done, and pretty quickly too. I’ll trade my Model X one day, and not worry, the experience I’ve already had with my CCS equipped BMW i3 helps back that up, along with knowing how fast chargers can pop up.

CDAVIS

… yup that’s *six years* later by a nimble well funded company that was laser focused to get it done. Your kidding yourself thinking that the traditional car makers can individually (or as a group… or as a group backing charging provides) get that done faster.

Doggydogworld

“…a nimble well funded company that was laser focused….”

…and willing to put chargers where they weren’t remotely economic in order to have a complete network. And willing to lose large sums on the network because it promoted car sales. Legacy carmakers act as if a complete network will just spontaneously appear.

CDspeed

At what point did I say they’d get it done faster? They have far more money then Tesla, so they technically could. My point was I’m not worried about the state of the infrastructure because I know it’s a work in progress. It’s only going to get better over time just like the Supercharger network did over the past six years. How fast will CCS improve, only time will tell.

John Doe

Chargers are being installed all over Europe, with a focus on countries that buy EVs.
They have planned this for years, so rolling out chargers are going well, at a high steady pace.
People must not forget slower chargers too.
A company I do some work for installed 60, 22kw chargers just this week, at one single company. Each charger can handle 2 cars.
Until each employee drives an EV, it also work as a power outlet for block heaters, coupe heaters and startet battery chargers. Depending on what options they have installed as an option on their ICE cars.
Chargers like this will handle probably 90% (I guess) of the juice they need for their EVs, during a normal year.

eject

So what is your wager on Ionity not having a network of 300+ destination with 6 outlets of 350kW capable chargers by 2020? (end of 2019 is what they proposed)

Mark.ca

The market desperately needs another $60K+ car.

Mulon Esk

Where’s my 35k Model 3?

Hans Blix

Vapourwareland