8th Tesla Supercharger In Hong Kong Now Open

JUN 29 2015 BY ALEXWAI 8

New Supercharger opened at Olympian City Hong Kong

New Supercharger at Olympian City added to the map (Screenshot Tesla site)

A member of the ChargedHK group reported the new Supercharger located in West Kowloon district at Olympian City has just opened. The Kowloon peninsula has now matched the same number of stations as well as spaces as the Hong Kong island, which many Tesla owners living in this part of town are excited to learn.

This is another strategic location as it is next to the main route towards the airport and near a shopping mall. This indoor facility and the headroom of these four charging space should be sufficient for the upcoming Model X Falcon doors. Tesla Hong Kong has been planning ahead when selecting charging locations. All existing Supercharging spaces meet the requirement to support Model X once available. This particular parking facility has a ceiling height limit of 2.2m (the lowest point “usually in areas with air ducts” where a vehicle can drive under inside the garage)

The developer Sino Group owns and manages the parking facility at this newly open Supercharger location is one of the top five real estate developers in Hong Kong. We look forward in hearing more developers taking initiative to support the growth of the EV community in the city.

Olympian City Phase 1 parking entrance Hong Kong (Photo A.Wai)

Olympian City Phase 1 parking entrance Hong Kong (Photo A.Wai)

Categories: Charging, Tesla

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8 Comments on "8th Tesla Supercharger In Hong Kong Now Open"

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sven

“This indoor facility and the headroom of these four charging space should be sufficient for the upcoming Model X Falcon doors. . . . This particular parking facility has a ceiling height limit of 2.2m (the lowest point ‘usually in areas with air ducts’ where a vehicle can drive under inside the garage).”

Has Tesla stated what is the minimum ceiling/overhead height required for the falcon-wing doors on the Model X to open? I don’t know if the air ducts in the picture are at a 2.2m (7′ 2.5″) height, but lights above the charging spots appear to be at about the same height as these air ducts.

Lensman
sven asked: “Has Tesla stated what is the minimum ceiling/overhead height required for the falcon-wing doors on the Model X to open?” So far as I know, Tesla has not officially answered that question. But the Model X falcon wing doors will be designed to open under a standard height American garage door, and fan analyses of pictures of the prototype suggest the maximum height of an open rear door will be 88″ (7′ 4″), with the outer edges of the door being 79.3″ (6′ 7.3″). By comparison, I measured the distance from my garage floor to the bottom of the overhead rails; it’s 85″ (7′ 1″). But the actual garage door is a few inches higher when open and overhead, so the 88″ clearance needed in the middle wouldn’t be a problem in our garage. http://my.teslamotors.com/forum/forums/gull-wing-falcon-wing-doors?page=2 More problematic is the attachment of the top of the door to the arm which pulls it up and down. The attachment sticks down a few inches when the garage door is opened. So in our garage, that would restrict the left falcon wing door from opening to the fully up position when the garage door is also open. Whether this would in… Read more »
sven

Thanks for the detailed response. I suspect the Tesla’s air suspension would also lower the car about an inch if the sensors detected it was cutting it close.

The other concern I have with the falcon-winged doors is that parking on a heavily crowned street would lower the edge of the curbside door a couple of inches (1-3″) and combined with a high sidewalk (8-10″) would make the door low enough for tall people to have to duck to avoid bonking their heads. Stepping out of the rear door in a driveway, tall people would have enough clearance; but stepping out onto a sidewalk/curb, tall people would have to remember to duck sometimes. The air suspension on the curbside could be raised to level the car on a heavily crowned street.

Lensman

sven said:

“The other concern I have with the falcon-winged doors is that parking on a heavily crowned street would lower the edge of the curbside door a couple of inches (1-3″) and combined with a high sidewalk (8-10″) would make the door low enough for tall people to have to duck to avoid bonking their heads.”

Given that the clearance at the top of the Model X’s rear doors will be considerably higher than the upper door sill of a normal car, where you would have to duck much lower, I don’t see this as a problem. And seriously, who parks against the curb when you’d have to step up a full foot to exit the vehicle? Generally speaking, people don’t park that way; or if they do, passengers don’t attempt to exit on that side.

I think your question boils down to “Yeah, it will be easier to get in and out of the back seat of the Model X than nearly any other car; but is it enough better?”

Having recently returned from Hong Kong, I wonder why superchargers are useful in HK, other than for those who have no charging at their home car park. Unless in commercial service, it would be a challenge to deplete the charge on even a 60 kWh Model S in a single day of driving around the territory (200 miles/322 km). Perhaps more as a marketing tool/ range insurance? People there are usually dumbfounded by the prospect of an American-style road trip, covering 500+ miles per day (805 km).

Acevolt

They should really just put in destination chargers if they are not needed for road trips. It seems like people are also using these in Hong Kong for their only source of power based on a previous post.

Lensman

Jay Donnaway asked:

“I wonder why superchargers are useful in HK, other than for those who have no charging at their home car park… Perhaps more as a marketing tool/ range insurance?”

Yes. Tesla uses the Supercharger network as a marketing tool, helping relieve range anxiety in prospective customers, thus making the car seem more attractive. Furthermore, Tesla gets lots of free publicity from media coverage of installation of new Superchargers… coverage like this article!

But you’re right; from a strictly geographic viewpoint, there’s no rational reason for a Supercharger to be installed in Hong Kong itself. To support long-distance travel, any Superchargers should be installed on the route to and from Hong Kong; any charging done in HK itself should be done with destination chargers.

Now the other issue, people using Superchargers to replace home charging… Elon Musk recently posted a complaint about that, stating that the Supercharger network is only intended for support of long distance trips, and said Model S drivers shouldn’t be using it for local charging. But with the reported difficulties of PEV (Plug-in EV) owners in China being able to access any charger anywhere, whether at home or on the road, we should expect heavy use by locals.

Bill

In HK most people (90%+) live in apartments. Most of these apartments cannot support HPWC or even 10a connections due to electric capacity, legal issues or owner’s committee regulations. Hence many EV owners use whatever public facilities are available. This is our only option if we want to use an EV. Tesla’s network of superchargers is used as the primary charging source by many people as we have no reasonable alternative. Without these superchargers Tesla would sell a lot less cars as charging is the biggest constraint.
My understanding is that London has a similar issue in that many residences cannot support charging so public charging facilities are required.