Pretty Neat Plug-In Utility Vehicle 3D Printed By DoE (Translogic Video)

JUL 17 2016 BY MARK KANE 4

Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a special 3D-Printed Utility Vehicle (PUV), which essentially is an electric vehicle with range extender – but running on CNG.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration connects a 3D-printed building and vehicle to showcase a new approach to energy use, storage and consumption. Photo by Carlos Jones (ORNL)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy (AMIE) demonstration connects a 3D-printed building and vehicle to showcase a new approach to energy use, storage and consumption. Photo by Carlos Jones (ORNL)

The all-electric range is said to be about 35 miles (56 km), and the top speed is 35 mph. Weight of the vehicle stands at 4,010 lbs (1,819 kg).

One of the features is wireless charging, with b-directional capability to powers home, 3D-printed as well of course.

“Translogic host Jonathon Buckley heads to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee to drive a 3D-Printed Utility Vehicle (PUV) created by the U.S. Department of Energy for its AMIE Project. The PUV uses an electric-hybrid propulsion system, with a range-extending compressed natural gas generator. As if that wasn’t high-tech enough, the PUV can be powered by a 3D printed home, or power the home through vehicle-to-grid wireless charging.”

DoE's PUV from ORNL via Translogic

DoE’s PUV for AMIE from ORNL (got all that?) via Translogic

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4 Comments on "Pretty Neat Plug-In Utility Vehicle 3D Printed By DoE (Translogic Video)"

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Cool!

I wonder how big an object that 3D printer can create? I notice they’re showing sections of that “house” as single pieces (I’d call it a cabin), but those cabin pieces might have been assembled from smaller units.

It would be interesting to see a list of parts for that vehicle which were not 3D printed. With the description given of the material, the same plastic as Lego blocks but with carbon fiber added, I’m guessing that was only for the body of the vehicle. So my guess is that the list of 3D printed parts would be much shorter than the list of parts which were not. Even the seats seem to be manufactured items added after the 3D parts of the vehicle were assembled.

Did they 3d print the battery, or is this just a silly gimick to get on this page?

When they said that their car uses “GAS” I understood that these guys are nor smart…