2019 Chevy Volt Finally Gets 7.2 kW Charger, -13 Degrees F Engine Activation

JUN 28 2018 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 115

It’s been asked for since the Chevy Volt first debuted way back in 2010 and for 2019…it’s here.

Say hello to the 7.2 kW onboard charger in the 2019 Chevrolet Volt. Unfortunately, it’s not standard across the range:

With the new 7.2 kW system, a complete recharge can be achieved in as little as 2.3 hours with a 240-volt outlet and supporting hardware. The new system is standard on the 2019 Volt Premier model and available on the LT trim. A 3.6 kW charger is standard on the Volt LT.

2019 Chevrolet Volt

Though this is certainly the most significant change / upgrade for 2019, other notable alterations have been made too, including this:

In addition to the new charging system, the 2019 Volt offers a number of enhancements designed to improve convenience and help owners get more out of their all-electric driving experience.

For those in colder climates who want to use as little gas as possible, the 2019 Volt allows activation of the automatic engine-assisted heating system to be deferred until much lower temperatures — minus 13 degrees F / minus 25 degrees C — for more all-electric operation.

The 2019 Volt also features new Low and Regen on Demand profiles that enable increased regenerative braking capability when drivers let off the accelerator pedal. The feature helps the vehicle achieve its class-leading EV range, and the updates come with an improved driving feel with smoother operation when slowing.

As well as a rather lengthy bullet list of slighter changes:

  • GM’s continuing evolution of the pedestrian alert system, first deployed in 2011, now using front and rear speakers to provide audible alerts when operating at slow speeds.
  • A new digital rearview camera replaces the previous analog system.
  • New driver-switchable Adaptive Cruise Control allows the choice of conventional cruise control or adaptive cruise control.
  • New tire fill alert sounds a horn when full tire pressure is achieved.
  • New, decorative seating patterns are offered on cloth seats.
  • New Power Convenience Package available on LT adds a power driver seat in addition to all content offered on the Comfort Package.
  • Wireless charging pad for compatible phones is relocated ahead of the shifter for easier use (available with navigation radio).
  • New Pacific Blue Metallic exterior color is available.
  • New Jet Black/Porcelain Blue interior is offered on Premier.
  • Available dealer-installed blackout package includes sport pedals, black front/rear bowtie emblems and 17-inch machined-aluminum wheels with black-painted pockets.

More info in the press blast below:

2019 CHEVROLET VOLT CHARGES QUICKER, IMPROVES CONVENIENCE

DETROIT — A new 7.2 kW charging system on the 2019 Chevrolet Volt cuts recharging times nearly in half by adding about twice the all-electric driving range per hour of charge.

The new system headlines a number of additional enhancements for the 2019 Volt and increases the vehicle’s all-electric utility for owners who take advantage of “opportunity charging,” or plugging in around town to top off the battery charge.

“With about twice the range added during 240V Level 2 charging sessions, the 2019 Volt’s 7.2 kW system makes opportunity charging more worthwhile,” said Jesse Ortega, chief engineer, Chevrolet Electric Vehicles. “It effectively extends the vehicle’s all-electric driving range, while providing about twice the range for the money when plugging in at public facilities that charge by the hour.”

With the new 7.2 kW system, a complete recharge can be achieved in as little as 2.3 hours with a 240-volt outlet and supporting hardware. The new system is standard on the 2019 Volt Premier model and available on the LT trim. A 3.6 kW charger is standard on the Volt LT.

The new charging system complements the Volt’s extended-range electric propulsion system, which with a full tank of gas and a full charge offers an EPA-estimated 53 miles of pure EV range and 106 MPGe, or gasoline equivalent. When the Volt’s battery runs low, a gas-powered generator kicks in to extend the driving range to a total of 420 miles (675 km) on a full tank.

Improved owner experience

In addition to the new charging system, the 2019 Volt offers a number of enhancements designed to improve convenience and help owners get more out of their all-electric driving experience.

For those in colder climates who want to use as little gas as possible, the 2019 Volt allows activation of the automatic engine-assisted heating system to be deferred until much lower temperatures — minus 13 degrees F / minus 25 degrees C — for more all-electric operation.

The 2019 Volt also features new Low and Regen on Demand profiles that enable increased regenerative braking capability when drivers let off the accelerator pedal. The feature helps the vehicle achieve its class-leading EV range, and the updates come with an improved driving feel with smoother operation when slowing.

A new Chevrolet Infotainment 3 system with an 8-inch-diagonal color touchscreen incorporates a new Energy App. The app’s Impacts Screen shows drivers how driving style, route, weather conditions and cabin comfort setting may affect range and conveys the impact more intuitively based on mileage rather than the previous numerical “score.” Drivers will enjoy having more information about their efficiencies and can aim to eke out every EV mile possible.

The 2019 Volt also introduces its first power driver’s seat. The six-way seat is standard on Premier and available on LT models.

Additional changes and updates:

GM’s continuing evolution of the pedestrian alert system, first deployed in 2011, now using front and rear speakers to provide audible alerts when operating at slow speeds.
A new digital rearview camera replaces the previous analog system.
New driver-switchable Adaptive Cruise Control allows the choice of conventional cruise control or adaptive cruise control.
New tire fill alert sounds a horn when full tire pressure is achieved.
New, decorative seating patterns are offered on cloth seats.
New Power Convenience Package available on LT adds a power driver seat in addition to all content offered on the Comfort Package.
Wireless charging pad for compatible phones is relocated ahead of the shifter for easier use (available with navigation radio).
New Pacific Blue Metallic exterior color is available.
New Jet Black/Porcelain Blue interior is offered on Premier.
Available dealer-installed blackout package includes sport pedals, black front/rear bowtie emblems and 17-inch machined-aluminum wheels with black-painted pockets.
“The 2019 Volt’s enhancements give customers more of what they love with the vehicle and make it even more useful as an everyday electric vehicle,” said Ortega. “It’s a more seamless experience than ever.”

Availability

The 2019 Chevrolet Volt goes on sale this fall.

FAST FACT: Volt owners have driven more than 2.8 billion EV miles, saving more than 108 million gallons of gas.

Categories: Charging, Chevrolet

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115 Comments on "2019 Chevy Volt Finally Gets 7.2 kW Charger, -13 Degrees F Engine Activation"

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vdiv

What took them so long and where is the CCS DCFC?

Will

Don’t need it when you have thousands of gas stations

menorman

Tell that to the Outlander PHEV…

vdiv

Or the i3 REx

Will

i3 is mostly a bev. Which is more feasible to have a ccs

pjwood1

I3 had a ~2.7 gallon gas tank, that got “upgraded” to something like 3(?).

CA BEVX rules were BMW’s opportunity to gimp its electric, in yet another way. Sad, but true that it can use DCFC because it needs gas every ~100miles after the initial charge is depleted.

Brian

Hey Mitsubishi – putting a CHAdeMO port on your PHEV is silly. It adds unnecessary stress to the battery, and will only save a fraction of a gallon of gas each time it is used.

vdiv

“Is that so?” said the 16 kWh iMIEV.

Brian

In case you missed it, the iMiEV was a BEV, not a PHEV. Apples and Oranges, my friend.

vdiv

Batteries are batteries. They have a BMS that can limit the charging current in either case.

Brian

The keyword here is “unnecessary”. If the i-MiEV is running low, recharging is necessary to keep moving. If the Outlander PHEV is running low on battery, it can simply burn a little gas. Recharging it would only save a fraction of a gallon each time. It seems penny wise / pound foolish to me to not just use your PHEV as a PHEV at that point.

vdiv

People who drive these cars find DCFC “convenient”, if not “necessary” and use it a lot.

Brian

Well if it gets more demand on the QC infrastructure which in turn causes more build out, then I am all for it. As long as the resulting build out includes both CHAdeMO and CCS.

Viking79

Do you really want to be in your Bolt EV or i3 BEV and be waiting an hour for an outlander to gain 20 miles range?

marshall

The Outlander is CHAdeMO. So no worries for Bolt or I3 owners.

Bolt driver

Many of the local dcfc are also chademo chargers as well, so yes it would matter. I have had to wait for leafs to charge.

bro1999

Yes, and for many stations, if the CHAdeMO port is in use, the CCS port can’t be used to charge until the CHAdeMO is finished charging. And vice versa.

ClarksonCote

Semantics

ga2500ev
This doesn’t seem to make sense. A small battery pack coupled with a higher powered DCFC station would mean very short charging times on the order of 15 minutes or less for an 80% charge of an empty battery. Your point though illustrates a separate problem in the plug-in charging space: plug accessibility. Right now there is essentially a one to one to one mapping between chargers, plugs, and parking spaces. So only one EV can park in a spot to use a single plug for a single charger. With the charging times, trying to run a gas station queueing model on it causes much upset for all involved. Those who a charging have to rush back to move their car out of the precious space, while those who are waiting, well they have to wait which sucks. The new model needs to have a one to one mapping between parking spaces and plugs, but can have a single charger service multiple parking spaces with multiple plugs. A single charger with 4 or 8 plugs can service 4-8 cars where everyone parks and plugs in, then shares the power on the charger. With some simple scheduling, along the lines of… Read more »
menorman

…and the Prius Prime in Japan…

Will

Useless

Bobby

Yes, yes you are….

Mike

You go to the gas station. I’ll drive past them in my 2019 Volt

Viking79

Although it would be nice for 0-80% charging, that is only like 40 miles, I would rather they didn’t. Do you really want to wait in line for an hour or more for a Volt to get to 100% at CCS before you can charge a BEV? The 7.2 will take it to 100% in probably 2.5 hours including cell balancing.

bro1999

0 point in the Volt getting CCS.
If it had a 100 mile EV range or so, then it starts to make sense. But for 53 miles? Waste of money.

Will

If it was 80 miles epa aer, then CCS would be worth it but not for 50miles

EVShopper

DCFC is for long road trips. The Volt has an ICE range extender for that.

ga2500ev

We really need to work on changing this perception. DCFC facilitates flexible charging that matches the available power to the car. DC Flexible charging is perfect for that 15 minute stop at the grocery or the half hour sit down to grab a coffee or a bite to eat. It doesn’t only have to be maximum power for road trips.

This is the case for both pure BEVs and for PHEVs. Every vehicle with a plug should have a DC Flexible Charging interface so that power can be directly and efficiently be delivered to the battery.

ga2500ev

bro1999

Nice! A lot of these changes will not be appreciated much by the casual EV shopper, but for Volt fans they are certainly pretty sweet (especially the 7.2 kW charging, lower ERDTT temp, and power seat!).

MTN Ranger

Where I live with my first gen, ERDTT was annoying. With -13F, it would never go on for me. Nice.

Viking79

Exactly, might get it 1 or 2 days a year. My Gen 1 was 25 F, which is like 90+ days a year with the engine starting. Moving it to 15 F cut it back to like 30 days a year for later Gen 1 and Gen 2.

pjwood1

Good comment. Same with Pacifica hybrid. There’s real appeal to 7KW, over ~3KW. It opens up a lot more double-trip all-electric opportunity.

Practically speaking, I would never use supercharging as frequently as I would appreciate this simple AC wattage difference.

Kdawg

Yes, that was my reaction as well. I think a bigger rear seat is the only thing needed to check most people’s boxes now. That will have to come in the next generation though, as it would be a significant change.

Ziv

Kdawg, I would love a roomier back seat, but it isn’t going to happen this gen, as you note. Pity. I still have my Gen 1 Volt, in large part due to the fact that the new Volt doesn’t have a bigger back seat. I do love the faster charging, the power seat and the lower ERDTT setting, though. The Volt is becoming the car most of us wanted, a couple years before GM will phase it out, in all probability.

menorman

That’s why Honda is going to steal a bunch of Volt sales with the Clarity PHEV. But GM has been at it awhile now, they should lower the price anyway. Bring it down to around $30k to start and they’d move a lot of them again.

Kdawg

They need to get that Buick CUV PHEV out pronto.

Ziv

bro, I made my top three choices the subject of my post and scroll down, and you chose the same 3. Faster charging makes mid-day, lunch break charging sessions at pay chargers a lot less irritating. And it is funny just how irritated I get when I haven’t needed any gasoline for a couple months and the engine kicks in the moment it hits 15 degrees. Power seat isn’t a biggie for me, but I know a lot of people that really miss it.
For most Volt drivers the extra speed of a DCFC’er (vs. a 7.2 kW charger) would be useful at most once or twice a year. Though some of us would use it to its full potential more often, most wouldn’t need it. So the extra cost isn’t worth it. The irritating thing about the upgrade to 7.2 kW charging is that it should have happened years ago, because it costs next to nothing to upgrade from 3.3/3.6 to 7.2 and it doubles the amount of miles of additional AER you get at a short time charging session.

Tony Marco

Eight years for 7.2 kW charging system (and not even standard like my EV was back in 2014) and power seats !

And people ask why GM takes long ???

vdiv

Yeah. Perhaps another question is why they finally did it.

menorman

Yes, especially since the Volt is apparently not going to survive much longer anyway.

Sustainable2020

Answers:
1) To further differentiate the volt as the best phev overall/value offered in the states.
2) To better fight the popular Prius prime and other phevs here n coming.
3) To better fight the much better and coming bev competition.
4) To better streamline costs as the bolt uses the same size on board charger…I think.
5) To continue the history of improving the volt during the middle cycle years as GM did with improving range with the first gen volt.

Will the volt have better range though?

john1701a

Better is dependent upon who the audience is.

Ordinary consumers certainly haven’t been asking for faster L2 charging. In fact, most mainstream shoppers have absolute no idea what that even means. Their primary request has been a reduced MSRP to make it a more compelling choice.

As for the ability to run a power-hungry resistance-heater at temperatures below 15°F, that’s nice but not feature many will actually be able to exploit. Even here in Minnesota, there simply are not that many days when that would deliver a huge payoff. Doesn’t EV become available after the coolant reaches a certain temperature?

CCIE

You have no idea what you’re talking about wrt the heater and ERDTT. Running the engine to supplement defrost heat at semi-low temperatures was one of the only design flaws the Volt ever had. This new super-low setting effectively corrects that flaw.

The Volt was already the best PHEV available. It’s now a little better. And, if you don’t want to pay for the 7.2kw Charger, you have the option not to. Options are good.

Nebula1701

ERDTT was used for cabin heating and to assist with Battery coolant heating.

CCIE

It was used because there are some archaic federal standards about minimum time to defrost the windshield in any car with a gas engine. GM used ERDTT to more quickly heat the cabin coolant loop so that the windshield could be cleared faster during the test the federal spec requires. In the real world ERDTT provides almost no advantage and wastes gas.

In the Volt the engine and cabin coolant loops can be connected. The battery coolant loop is completely isolated, so ERDTT has nothing to do with the battery.

Viking79

Although that might factor into it, there is no reason the electric heater couldn’t easily meet the requirements.

Kdawg

troll1701a is just setting you up so he can talk about the PP’s heat pump. It won’t end until he explains to you how 4 seats is better than 5, and wavy glass is “super awethom”.

john1701a

Volt is neither a leader with EV nor HV efficiency. Note the kW/mi and MPG ratings. Using less electricity and less gas is the goal, right?

Also, GM’s goal was to “right size” battery capacity. So, the option of faster recharging is a bit of a head-scratcher. Who would be interested in that option?

Remember, GM’s ultimate solution to “range anxiety” ended up being Bolt, which makes Volt without any specific audience now.

menorman

The thing about the faster recharging is that it makes intraday runs on full-electric MUCH easier. Plus, the Clarity PHEV offers it on what is arguably already a better car than the Volt in the first place, so it was necessary to stay competitive.

Kdawg

“less gas is the goal, right? Also, GM’s goal was to “right size” battery capacity”
———-
These things go hand in hand. Driving 53 miles in the Volt will use less gas than all other PHEVs out there except the BMW i3.

CCIE

The Volt is the undisputed PHEV (really EREV). People might be too dumb to buy it, but it is the best one, especially given the out the door price it can be bought for.

menorman

The case for 1) is really questionable now that the Clarity PHEV is available on the market. It’ll no doubt still sell, but it’s a stiff field of competition now and of course, there’s the whole segment of people who only begrudgingly got the Volt because it was the only thing available with the capability who may now return to a Honda (or upgrade to full BEV e.g. TM3).

Don Zenga

Fear of Tesla.

energymatters

Any word on more KWH as well? a 200 mile battery plus range extender is a killer combo.

vdiv

A 200-mile battery won’t need a range extender, it would need a DCFC capability.

menorman

A waste of both resources.

Mark W

Good list of improvements! I think it’s a mistake though to not include the 7.2 kw charger as standard. That old slow charger should not be in ANY 2019 car!

Viking79

It adds a lot of cost and most don’t really need it on an EREV like the Volt. It is smart to have it a pay for option to help with otherwise discounted Volt sales.

The new features are great. I hope we see the new GM EV soon, supposed to be out by year end.

Mike

I wonder if it really does add much cost going from 3.6 to 7.2. Yes it probably requires some modifications, but isnthe marginal cost increase to Chevy really that much? I would be surprised if the actual difference in manufacturing cost is more than 15-25$. I sure bet the Chevy will charge buyers much more and they makes a ton of money on this option.

I do agree that the changes they made address just about everything that I didn’t like about my 2016. Nice improvements in the basic car.

Viking79

It about doubles the cost of the charger, the costs are going to be strongly tied to the capacity. Probably adds at least $1000 to user’s cost, GM maybe more like $300-$500 range. Having all the same chargers across the fleet might reduce GM’s expense some though. The DC connection was a $750 upgrade or so, and that is essentially wires to the battery pack.

Ziv

I thought the marginal cost to produce a 6.6 vs. a 3.6 was under $200. There was a big kerfuffle about it here about 3 years when the Gen 2 Volt came out, and if I remember correctly, which is not entirely certain, the consensus was that getting to 6.6 was cheap, getting to 10 was a bit more expensive. And that was a consensus of the people that seemed to be making sense, not the “It will cost less than $20!” sorts.
I always thought that the actual cost for GM to install a noticeably more complex DCFC unit that has a 50 kW capability would be around $600, and they charge more to harvest a nice profit on the option.
GM cost vs. the price they charge us for the option are two different numbers, of course.
But I have to admit that this is not an area that I have personal experience in, just reading the numbers that come up on various websites, which isn’t exactly the best way to calculate anything.

Viking79

DCFC in a car is just wires to the battery. The charger is outside the car and on the order of $10 to $20 thousand.

menorman

Correct, that’s where GM is making a killing. The upgrade probably “costs” a good 10x the actual cost.

Ziv

The marginal cost of going from 3.3 to 6.6 was supposed to be less than $200, if memory serves, so going from 3.6 to 7.2 is probably very low as well.

ga2500ev

I’d make exactly the same argument in terms of a DCFC, what I call a DC Flexible Charging, interface. No plug-in car in 2019 should be without it.

ga2500ev

xm

-No fix for rear seat headroom.
-Is that horrible “burgundy” interior still an option?
-Cheap rear suspension, as if Chevy engineers don’t know independent suspensions.

It still needs improvement.

Prsnep

You can’t fix rear seat headroom without redesigning the car altogether.

Wade Malone

Power driver seat! FINALLY!

7.2kW charging option is good too! 🙂

bro1999

So the ’19 Volt finally gets some decent updates, 3 years after the ’16 came out.
That probably means we can expect some updates come to the Bolt next year as a 2020 model, since it debuted as a ’17.

Sustainable2020

Fourth year of vehicle gen for improvements is the norm for non-Tesla automakers.

GM really needs to increase the quick charge capability to at least 150kwh for all 2020 bolts and of course make quick charging capability a standard feature. Make aeb standard as well.
Perhaps range will be increased a bit to above 250 miles too

TwoVolts

That would be nice – although sooner would be better. My wish list for the Bolt: Wider front seats, a more premium interior on the Premier model, a redesign of the back end exterior, and of course a little more range is always a plus – especially for a BEV. The Bolt is a great offering- but with some notable shortcomings that need to be addressed.

Ziv

My list for the Bolt would be:
1) Tweak the exterior to make it look a bit more like the Encore.
2) Faster DCFC rate, at least 75 kW on the base, preferably w/150 kW on the Premier, if it can be done at a reasonable price.
3) Upgrade the interior, both the dash and the front seats.
4) Add 5 more kWh using the existing pack dimensions, (just an 8% increase in 3 years) so the AER goes up by 20 miles.

menorman

DCFC is more a software fix than hardware, though it depends on what the wires they currently use are rated for. But if they can take say 150kW, then GM could at least theoretically even update it over-the-air to that higher charge rate. Of course, since some are nearing the end of their warranty life already, I fully expect that someone will soon start digging into the car’s software suite themselves and see about tweaking it on their own.

Viking79

Nice:
“New driver-switchable Adaptive Cruise Control allows the choice of conventional cruise control or adaptive cruise control.”

Many vehicles make this too difficult or disallow completely (like my i3), hope this is easy to enable for those conditions where ACC isn’t working right. Like my i3 it cuts off shortly after sunrise if the sun is hitting the camera. Really annoying, it would be nice to have regular cruise for those times.

john1701a

That’s what Toyota draws attention to the fact that their Adaptive Cruise Control uses Radar.

As for having the option to use conventional, why? What possible benefit could there be to shutting off that safety/convenience feature?

ClarksonCote

Well a quick search shows lots of issues with Toyota’s own adaptive cruise control, so here’s several reasons why someone with a Toyota may want it:
http://www.letmegooglethat.com/?q=toyota+adaptive+cruise+control+problems

john1701a

Vague references to “issues” are hardly constructive. Toyota has not only may the feature standard across most of their vehicles, they are now moving to the second-generation of the full safety package. Think about how many millions vehicles that includes and how few “issues” have actually been encountered.

ClarksonCote

You asked for reasons why someone may want to use regular cruise. I answered you and provided reasons.

alohart

When the ACC’s camera is blinded by the sun, you could switch to regular cruise control by pressing and holding either button that changes the following interval.

Viking79

This works on the i3? I thought I had tried that and it didn’t work, maybe I held the set button. So just press and hold the follow distance button?

Mark.ca

Wow, very interesting. I was in a short vacation recently and tested an Impreza that had the ACC and drove it for +500 miles with it over 4 days and didn’t see any problems at any time of day. It worked flawlessly and i was very impressed.

Viking79

There is probably some situation where it won’t work, maybe light rain, etc. This was very specific sun angle over a small window, so unless you are driving 24-7 you might not notice this situation. However, many people commute this time of day so it could impact their commute if it happened to fall into that narrow situation where it didn’t work.

I drove the i3 Rex from CA to IA (2000 miles) so got very familiar with the ACC and loved it most of the time 😉

vdiv

The elephant in the room is the Honda Clarity PHEV. Competition works.

Anthony

Yeah, that’s what I thought when I saw the list of improvements – its trying to achive parity with the Clarity PHEV.

The upgrade list is reasonable. I don’t think people should expect huge gains in range or efficiency with the Volt minor updates. At this point, I think GM would work harder to make the battery 1) cheaper and 2) smaller instead of adding more range to the car. 50+ miles of EV range is plenty for a lot of people.

Mark.ca

If Clarity phev had the lease deals the Volt has it would put up some impressive numbers. As it stands, Honda is trying really hard to pretend they are not stealing the fed credit.

theflew

You do realize the Clarity PHEV is using GM tech? GM/Honda signed a deal years ago.

Viking79

No, it is not, it is very different operation than the GM Voltec. Yes, they might have signed a license agreement, no, the Clarity PHEV hybrid is nothing like the Volt in transmission other then they are both Multi-Mode Power Split devices.

The Clarity PHEV has a simple mechanical fixed gear ratio reduction that can be clutched in directly hooking the wheels to the engine, or it can run in e-CVT mode. It doesn’t use the planetary setup like the Volt uses.

Ziv

I drove the Clarity and the only edge it had on the Volt was the roomier back seat. It is just a kludge of a car.

menorman

To a lot of people, that’s a HUGE benefit. Also the Clarity is a bit more refined on the interior than the Volt at the same price point.

ziv

The reason I noticed the Clarity’s roomy back seat so much is that I really need more space in the back seat than my Gen I Volt has. I tour with clients and other agents in my car, and getting the 4th person in can be a huge challenge. The funny thing is that agents like to tour in my car because it is electric.
But a roomy back seat doesn’t make a car, even if the lack of space is what really irritates me the most about my Volt.

bjrosen

Very disappointing. I was hoping for a big boost in battery capacity, instead there is none. Guess I’ll stick with my 2017 for a few more years.

Viking79

I see the feature set appealing to Gen 1 holdouts. I would expect no battery increases for the Volt, ever. If anything PHEVs will go to less EV range and BEVs will have the larger batteries to make up for not having gas.

fotomoto

And where would GM stuff all that additional capacity?

alohart

GM could stuff battery cells with increased energy density in the same space used by the current battery pack. The battery pack of the 2019 i3 will have twice the capacity of that in the 2016 i3 in the same battery pack volume.

ClarksonCote

The Volt has all the electric range it needs. Battery upgrades will come in the form of future GM BEVs and EREV SUVs.

Viking79

Although this is true, it also adds weight, and weight is an enemy of the Volt. I really don’t think that car can handle more of it which is why they held out features like power seats. The i3 increased density battery is much heavier than the previous battery and required many suspension upgrades, etc.

Ziv

BJ, I think EREV is a balancing act. GM is trying to appeal to the maximum amount of people while limiting the amount of money they invest in the technology and the vehicles. I think 53 miles of AER is the sweet spot that satisfies more drivers while costing the least and taking up a moderate amount of cabin space. Having a genset and 100 miles of AER just wouldn’t make sense to enough people. In a similar way, GM just upped the charge rate from 3.6 to 7.2 kW. But they didn’t add an option for DCFC’ing. Because it just wouldn’t appeal to enough Volt buyers.

menorman

Also, that range gets the max CARB credits for the ZEV program. There’s little reason to go beyond that and especially with the competition out today, a boost in range (even say ~50% over current to around 75 miles) wouldn’t do a whole lot for sales.

Leeper

What is the cost differential between a 3.6 kW and a 7.2 kW charger? You would think that it would b cheaper just to put the 7.2 in all of them and buy in bulk.

EVShopper

Which is maybe what they are doing since the Bolt uses 7.2 kW charger.

bro1999

Nope, 3.6 kW is still standard for the LT trim (optional to add). But 7.2 kW standard on the Premier trim.

Viking79

Eventually, yes. At 15,000 per year probably no difference though. My guess is a 7.2 kW charger costs nearly twice as much to manufacturer.

I suppose when they are selling half a million PHEV/EV per year they will use the same charger in all of the cars.

God/Bacardi

The Volt Chief Engineer, Andrew Farah, was asked at the Gen2 Volt launch why didn’t it get power seats which was a chief complaint, he cited weight…Glad the powers that be fixed a chief complaint…7.2KW helps everyone not be a charging hog because if you can find a free L2 charger, it’s often SLOWER 208v and not the 240v…

The bigger story that anyone is welcome to write about is “new Low and Regen on Demand profiles”…Did the Volt just get true one pedal driving?

Don Zenga

Welcome news. So until now it took 4 1/2 hours and during a long range drive, if we stop somewhere for an hour lunch, we can get only 20 % of the charge that will be good enough for 1 / 4.5 * 53 = 12 mile range.

Now with double the rate, we can get 25 mile range. Pressure is stepping up on GM and they are responding.
What did Ford do?
They phased out C-Max (Hybrid & Plugin)
Discontinued Focus-Electric

Reduced the
Fusion-Hybrid from 3 to 2 trims.
Fusion-Plugin from 2 to 1 trim.

Where is their $11 billion investment in electrification.

Bill Howland
Hummmm, interesting……. 1). 7.2 kw charger for the premiere…. Available on the LT? Assuming the LT gets a 3600 watt model how much will it be to order the bigger charger on the LT, if it is at all available in this trim? If it is the EXACT same part number as the BOLT ev charger, then it seems the charging rate will approach 8 kw if the incoming power is near 250 volts. Rather like Tesla used to advertise its ‘standard’ 40 amp cord as ’10 kw’ with a footnote that said ‘at 250 volts’. In any event it is pretty apparent this was competitive pressure from the ‘almost as good’ Honda Clarity which has an equivalently sized charging facility. 2). Incremental other improvements seem to indicate that what many thought were wrong, namely GM is *NOT* going to discontinue the VOLT just yet. They wouldn’t bother making changes to a car they were planning on getting rid of. Too bad Cadillac STILL doesn’t have a useful car that would sell in any numbers, seeing as the not-so new now plugin BOAT CT6 PHEV, isn’t even selling at 1/10th the rate the perfectly fine ELR did. At least someone… Read more »
Brian

I’m also waiting for the EV version of a Miata. A sporty two-seater convertible with a modest amount of power to the rear wheels. I just want to cruise with the top down, I don’t need to merge onto the highway from a dead stop in less than 2 seconds.

Bill Howland

Yeah whenever in high school the topic of ‘sporty cars’ came up, all the other guys wanted a BIG V-8 model. Whereas my dream car at the time was a VW Karman-Ghia convertible, green with beige interior. And with a whopping 36 or 40 horsepower depending on the year.

I finally got ‘kinda’ my dream car, a 2011 Tesla Roadster Convertible (zero options) , that was Evergreen with Beige interior. With an estimated EPA 244 miles of range – the car was a slam dunk since it was the MINIMUM I’d accept for range. I wanted an electric car I could drive somewhere.

Canadian Tesla employees loved it when I drove into the Mississauga (Toronto) Service Center (the only one that battery range would allow), because there were absolutely ZERO evergreen Tesla Roadsters sold in Canada, simply because individually they opted for the other color options. But I always felt that my color scheme choice was the Classiest, and apparently so did the Canadian Telsa workers since the only time they saw one is when I’d drive up there.

Dan

Finally! Good! Now make it into a Equinox and increase the battery size to 30KWH.

TheBlueFlash

Still no moonroof…*le sigh*

Ziv

Faster charging, lower temperature on the ERDTT and a power drivers seat. I can’t even begin to count the amount of people I have talked to who wanted these features. Way to go, GM! Now if we could just get a roomier back seat….

bro1999

It’s called a Bolt. 😉

Ziv

Touche!

Bob A

So you will need a 240 volt charger that puts out 32 amps out to get that 2 hour charge for the Volt, just as I use in on my Bolt that has 7.2 KW charging, that should had been on the Volt years a go to charge it up. My 2018 Volt has the 3.6 KW which is up From my 2015 Volt I had that had 3.3 KW charger. GM should have went to 7.2 KW on the 2016 Volt for gen 2 Volt. Plus 80 to 100 miles on battery before gas.

Bill Howland
Bob A agreed. I’m not so worried about the charge rate because I recharge generally overnight, but I too wouldn’t mind a big battery.. Apparently as I and many others have stated, the “Clarity” is providing competitive pressure for not only the PIPrius, but also the ‘VOLT’. I wish competitive pressure would cause GM to take the BOLT ev power train, and put it on 1 or 2 axles of a LARGE VEHICLE, so that you either had a 300 mile, 120 kwh BEV, or a 150 mile AER, 60 kwh PHEV Tahoe, Silverado, or Suburban. Green eye-shade accountants at large companies would be bowled over at the savings they could accrue over the life of such vehicles, especially the PHEV mentioned since its 4 cyl engine would be cheaper first cost, be better with gas, and probably would not need an overhaul over the life of the truck. A similarly sized single Planetary gear set (a la Gen 1) would wear very little compared to a regular automatic (since the clutches operate under ‘zero torque’ conditions), and operationally, it just wouldn’t matter whether the truck was at its home base recharging or away from ‘home’ on a job site… Read more »
Blastphemy

Very happy to see a power-adjustable driver’s seat and adaptive cruise control. Now if only it had all-wheel drive…