100+ MPG In Our BMW i8

SEP 21 2015 BY PEDER NORBY 70

As a long time EV only family, I had to “squint and surrender” my EV only purity ethic a little bit when I indulged my passion for the breathtaking aesthetics, technology and performance of the BMW i8. A truly once in a lifetime car.

Yes, I get 100 MPG driving in my BMW i8 in my normal day to day driving lifestyle.

A month of typical driving in the BMW i8, The MPG pegs at 99.9 If I were to guess the true MPG, It would be around 150mpg.

A month of typical driving in the BMW i8, The MPG pegs at 99.9
If I were to guess the true MPG, It would be around 150mpg.

This past month driving around our semi-urban, suburban home turf of Carlsbad California, our BMW i8 returned a fuel efficiency of somewhere north of 100 mpg. I expect this will be the normal life of our i8 in the years to come with the exception of a long road trip or two annually around America in which we average around 30mpg.

It’s an amazing world when a rocket ship from the future like the BMW i8, can return 3x, 4x, 5x the mpg of its competitive class. Trust me, almost every drive in my i8 involves a moment of two in sport mode. Sometimes as short as 3.6 seconds.

*Editor’s Note: This post appears on Peder’s blog. Check it out here.

But that’s not why this drivetrain is newsworthy.

It’s newsworthy Because BMW is populating it’s entire lineup with derivatives of this BMW i8 drivetrain. This year, the BMW 3, 5 & 7 series along with the X5 will all be available as Plug In Hybrids using similar drivetrains as the flagship BMW i8. In the coming years, every series and type of car produced by BMW will have a PHEV option.

Will these PHEV’s work well? Will they sell well? Will they offer a substantive improvement?

Bank on it.

My experience as a BMW i8 driver, can shed some light on the practicality or lack thereof of BMW’s push to PHEV’s.

If I thought the drivetrain was a joke and the electric bits of the car was just a marketing ploy, I’d be the first to write about it.

EV drivers and EV journalist can be harsh in their response to a PHEV with a 15 -20 electric only range as something less than pure. That’s wrongheaded and unfair.

As an EV driver by first choice, my experience with the BMW i8 these past nine months has demonstrated to me the great value of the PHEV architecture. I strongly believe there is a big market segment for plug in hybrids, especially if they share the garage with a full EV.

An EV and a PHEV make for a great garage

An EV and a PHEV make for a great garage

Make no mistake I’ll always strongly prefer an EV but having driven both, I see the value and transformational role that PHEV’s will play. There never has been just one type of car that works for all. EV and PHEV’s should play nice in the sandbox together, as they both transition people, some more hesitant and slow to change than others, to electric driving.

Here is what I have learned about 15-20 mile electric range PHEV’s and how this will translate to the wide range of BMW models soon to come.

  • The PHEV architecture from BMW gives all wheel drive and lots of torque off the line. These both represent improvements to the performance DNA of BMW.
  • The PHEV architecture give broader choices to suit driving conditions and preferences. Nothing beats rolling up to a nice restaurant in stealth mode.
  • If you don’t plug in, you won’t get the higher MPG.
  • You can use the supplied 110 volt charger and a normal wall plug with a PHEV. A 220 volt charger is a luxury but not a necessity.
  • There is no one MPG that can be stated, only a range. If a BMW i8 driver keeps it in sport or comfort mode all the time and never plugs the car in to an electrical outlet, (some BMW i8 drivers are surely like this) they will get around 25-30mpg. If the same car is plugged in every night and the majority of trips are local, the car will get over 100+mpg. EPA average for the car is 76mpg. But there really is no average, it all depends on how each driver uses the car.
  • As a thumb rule, take the EPA average on the Monroney label of a 15-20 mile PHEV and divide by two as a worst case expectation and multiply by two for a best case expectation. Weigh this against your driving needs and habits, and be honest. The more the battery only range, the higher you can multiply the upside.
  • In urban, semi-urban, suburban neighborhoods and cities, trips tend to be on the shorter side in length. Simply put, within a 20 mile distance, the amount of options and amenities available to a person is almost limitless and the need for long distance driving is lessened. Our shopping, banking, work, the beach, meeting rooms for service clubs, church, theaters, trails, lagoons, and 100’s of restaurants are all within 20 miles. In these areas, a person can expect a doubling or tripling of the MPG as compared to their gas only counterpart. In rural or semi rural areas with longer trips this advantage is far less.
  • It’s not only about gas mileage. Think about this, when my BMW i8 hits 50,000 miles one day, the gasoline engine will only have around 20,000 miles on it. For the other 30,000 miles the engine was just cargo in an electric car. So when a future BMW 330E is sold with 100,000 miles on the ODO, the gasoline engine may only have 40,000 miles on it, thus a far longer lifespan for that car.
  • It’s not only about gas mileage, it’s also about emissions and cleaner air in our congested cities.
You must plug in to get the higher MPG. You can use a normal plug and the supplied 110 volt charger, 220 volt is a luxury for a PHEV.

You must plug in to get the higher MPG. You can use a normal plug
and the supplied 110 volt charger, 220 volt is a luxury for a PHEV.

Cruising around San Diego in a BMW i8, experiencing the performance with a left click to sport mode every now and then, enjoying the driving dynamics of a lightweight carbon fiber 2+2 sports car / touring car and doing all of this plugged into sunshine and at 100 mpg is nothing short of amazing.

PHEV’s and EV’s both have a bright future, the marketplace is split roughly 50% to 50% between the two. Pick the right one for you and begin driving with a plug.

Of course, Chevy Volt drivers have been telling us this for years J

It’s my hope that BMW in addition to PHEV’s, keeps pushing the envelop of full EV’s as they have with the BMW i3, the highest efficiency rating of any car sold in the USA.

The future of transportation is not a fork in the road where carmakers choose one path only. It’s a future where there are more options, more types, and more ways to get to where you want to go.

Push the go pedal down hard on both EV’s and PHEV’s.

Loving our BMW i3’s and the BMW i8.

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70 Comments on "100+ MPG In Our BMW i8"

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Driving 100 miles in this car must be very uncomfortable.

If you have ever been in a BMW you would know that they can be many things, but uncomfortable isn’t one of them. I have been in everything from a 70s 2002 to a 2000s 328 and all of them have been a pleasure to drive and comfortable on the body.

There was a story about one of the upcoming PHEV’s that will probably “only” get around 25 miles of range.

Well, 25 miles times 365 days is 9000+ miles. Meanwhile the median number of miles driven on the median Leaf is also in the 9000’s.

Same total number of gallons of gas saved per year. But instead of needing a second car for longer road trips like when you own a Leaf (or any of the limited range pure EV’s) you just keep driving in gas mode.

But the thing to remember is that YMWV (your mileage WILL vary) when it comes to PHEV’s. So much depends upon what you do, how you drive, and what your personal driving patterns are, that it is impossible to generalize whether one PHEV range is “Bad” or “Good” for everybody.

“Well, 25 miles times 365 days is 9000+ miles. Meanwhile the median number of miles driven on the median Leaf is also in the 9000’s.”

“Same total number of gallons of gas saved per year.”

That’s certainly jumping to a conclusion. Perhaps Leaf owners tend to drive fewer miles per year, or perhaps they tend to own two cars, and use the other car for longer trips. Perhaps some of both. In any case, we shouldn’t assume that the typical driving habits of Leaf owners are the same as those who drive one of those tiny-ranged PHEVs.

Someone who uses a Leaf as their daily driver is seriously committed to eliminating use of gasoline, or at least reducing it as much as possible. Someone who owns a PHEV with only 11-25 miles of electric range is far less likely to be seriously committed to that goal.

100 miles on 1 gallon of gasoline?

100 miles on 1 gallon of gasoline, plus probably around roughly 100 kWh worth of electricity (give or take — just a guestimate, not intended to be authoritative.)

Ehm. How do you arrive at 100kWh/100 miles if the picture says clearly 3.7 miles/kWh?

3.7mi/kWh is around 27 kWh/100miles electricity. And one gallon of gas is roughly another 35kWh of energy. So in sum you are at 60kWh of energy per 100 miles.

The Prius is around 50 mpg –> so 2 gallons per 100 miles, meaning it uses roughly 70kWh of energy per 100 miles.

Nice one Peder!! Keep it up, I love EV and PHEV-roadtrips.

For the same price, you could have had a Tesla Model S P90D which would burn zero gasoline and would do all the things you noted the i8 can do. It can travel cross-country and use the highly dependable Supercharge network for fast recharges.

The i8 is based on outdated-technology. It’s an updated Prius. The future will be based on BEVs, not PHEVs.

The future may be BEV’s, but here in the present there is nothing wrong with PHEV’s as a logical stepping stone.

And while the Tesla Supercharger network is indeed pretty nice, it still does not cover 100% of trips for 100% of people.

Trying to say that there is no place for PHEV’s because the Model S (one car) may work most of the time for most people is a poor argument.

Mike good point and the Tesla S70 would cost less. Have you seen the price on an i8.

But the i8 looks absolutely stunning. And has zero range limitations.

It continues to confound me why some people refuse to think beyond one dimension of a many multi-dimensional car buying experience for normal people.

Indeed, why the need to make better the enemy of best. My Volt is a great solution. If there were a BEV available that one would fulfill my needs and two I could afford I’d already have opened my wallet. So here I am the Model S would work but I can’t afford it I can afford a leaf but it won’t go far enough so there you have it the situation for the 99% of America in the meantime my Chevy Volt is a stopgap solution and it works well giving me the ability to drive electric most of the time and reach farther when I need to at a price I can afford.

I agree with this. A good, affordable PHEV such as the Volt is the best option right now (I am a Leaf owner). However, in 2-3 years the Tesla III will the logical choice. It will combine affordability, pure EV travel, and practical long range driving via the Supercharger network.

The Leaf II and the Chevy Bolt will offer 200-miles EV range, but even this does not make long range travel practical without a nationwide network of superchargers on the Interstate highway system. GM and Nissan have shown no interest in investing in this despite the fact that each has much, much more resources than Tesla.

Even after Tesla Mode III becomes the logical choice for drivers with a home charging option, I think that phevs will be a good option for drivers that don’t — or drivers that move every few years and aren’t sure what their next place will have. particulaly if they have decent gas mileage, they offer pretty good flexibility while the public charging infrastructure catches up.

The Tesla version of “fast” refueling is roughly 1/100th the speed of gasoline refueling.

It takes about 2 minutes to fill up a typical tank and about 40 minutes for an 80% (recommended) charge at a supercharger. So, it’s more like 20-to-1. Even if you took an hour for a full charge, it would still be only 30-to-1.

By that analogy you could get a bicycle which could do anything the Tesla could do without using that wasteful electrical energy. Electricity comes from a source, traced back to coal in many cases. Or better yet, walk and carry a big backpack. You’re comparing apples to oranges. The i8 isn’t the Tesla nor does the Tesla do everything the i8 does. Unlimited range and MUCH better style for some. For others the Tesla is more beautiful. What a boring world if everyone drove the exact same vehicle around.

This matches what I get with the Fusion Energi (which has about 24 miles electric range). Since it can cover my entire commute and typical daily errants, I only need gas for longer trips. I usually hover around 100 MPG. Only when I take a longer trip, it temporarily drops down into the 90s.

I also have a similar experience with my CMax Energi. It is parked next to my Leaf at night – making my driveway a “poor man’s” version of Peder’s 🙂 I love my Leaf and am absolutely addicted to driving electric. But when I go on a road trip, the Energi is an EV that I get to bring with me!

So you got one. Cool. That must be a recent addition. I haven’t been reading for a week or so.

Yup, I picked it up a few weeks ago. My wife loves it. And I love having my Leaf back!

I had been plotting my driving for the past couple of years, and even then it seems I underestimated the percentage of miles I’d be driving the CMax in electric mode. It also makes for less coordination between who is taking which car. My wife and I used to have a daily discussion about who was driving farther (and therefore gets the Leaf). While I love talking with her, it’s nice to not have the tedium of that conversation every day. And the guilty feeling I’d get when I misjudged my day’s driving needs and had to drive the hybrid on a 10-mile excursion after work.

301 miles in a month is not a lot of miles .. but I imagine the i3 works better as a commuter vehicle.

My i3 does 1500 a month.

The i8 would be my weekend car though!

The 3.7 mi/kWh looked very impressive, but then the average speed is 30.3 mph. Plus, there was some fuel used on each trip, so obviously that number isn’t representative by itself. I’m wondering how the mpg calculation is really done… is it really mpge, combined with both fuel usage and electricity usage?

“Yes, I get 100 MPG driving in my BMW i8 in my normal day to day driving lifestyle.”

*Sigh*

What is it about driving a PHEV which causes otherwise apparently sensible people to start deliberately misusing the term “MPG”?

Is Peder Norby, author of this article, actually claiming that he can drive his BMW i8 100 miles using the chemical energy in one gallon of gasoline? No, of course he’s not. What he actually means is “For every 100 miles I drive in my plug-in hybrid EV, I burn only a gallon of gasoline.” That’s not the same thing at all as the “Miles Per Gallon” (MPG) metric.

This is just one item in a rapidly growing list of examples of why, for PHEVs, figures for gas consumption should be kept entirely separate from figures for EV range. When you mix the two, you come up with meaningless figures… like this misleading (if not outright deceptive) claim for “100 MPG”.

Anybody remember GM claiming “230 MPG” for the Volt? Well, this is the same exact deception.

Hmmm. . . why are electric driven miles included when calculating the MPG of a PHEV/EREV, but gasoline driven miles are never included when calculating the miles/kWh of a PHEV/EREV?

I see in the pic above of the screenshot of the “Trip computer” that the i8 uses only “Electrical consumption” to calculate mi/kWh, but uses total “Consumption” (gas and electricity) to calculate MPG.

Oh, so Peder Norby is merely reporting what his car’s onboard computer erroneously displayed as “MPG”? Well then, perhaps I should not have been so critical. He’s merely reporting erroneous data, not creating it.

It’s BMW which deserves to be castigated for reducing the metric “MPG” to nonsense. From what is reported at volt-stats.net, apparently GM does the same with the Volt.

Sigh, stop conflating a measure of gasoline use (MPG) with a measure of energy use (MPGe)

Many people want to use less gasoline, like Peder and myself. MPG as he describes is absolutely relevant and accurate for that measurement.

If you see someone riding a bicycle do you applaud them for reducing gasoline use, or ask them how many miles/1000 calories they get? Sheesh.

Haha. When I bike it instead of drive it, I end up eating a lot more food at work that day. I do more laundry too. I’m not sure I save any money, and I have no idea on the total impact. I probably need the exercise, but I just hope I don’t get run over by this *sshole:

http://insideevs.com/audi-a3-e-tron-new-arrival-video/

ClarksonCote said:

“Sigh, stop conflating a measure of gasoline use (MPG) with a measure of energy use (MPGe)”

I’m not the one conflating anything, ClarkesonCote.

“Many people want to use less gasoline, like Peder and myself. MPG as he describes is absolutely relevant and accurate for that measurement.”

Really? Then presumably you describe all BEVs as having infinite MPG? That’s no more silly than including electric miles in a PHEV’s “MPG” rating.

Yes, it is absolutely true that all BEVs use zero gas. However, that is not the same thing as “infinite” MPG.

To say that a BEV gets “infinite” MPG is like saying that an ICE car gets “infinite” miles/kWh of electricity.

Yes, thank you for supporting my point.

So what do you propose instead? MPGe?

Your picture that you posted again with the 230 mpg is much closer to reality than MPGe for me. In terms of miles / gas used it is GM’s 230 mpg is underestimated substantially. Cars I had prior can’t even compare, even after factoring electricity costs.

Peder’s plug ins run on solar power. Many others do as well. I’ve got solar and a pacific nw energy grid. A lot of people have either or both of those, so miles driven / gallons of gas or diesel is much more important than MPGe for many.

More useful than either MPG or MPGe is the epa’s plug in calulator:
https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=phev1Prompt

Be cool if it also included BEV’s and ICE vehicles, AND let you calculate totals for multi-car household scenarios.

Nate asked:

“So what do you propose instead? MPGe?”

Of course not. MPGe is a ridiculous metric which pretends that EVs are just gasmobiles which use a different fuel.

MPG is a measure of a car’s fuel efficiency. Contrariwise, what the BMW i8’s onboard computer (and apparently the Volt’s, too) is reporting is merely a sort of trip meter. If y’all really think that’s important for some reason, then come up with some sort of metric that actually makes sense. Maybe something like GCTM: Gasoline Consumption per Trip Mile. For that metric, a low number would be better.

“Your picture that you posted again with the 230 mpg is much closer to reality than MPGe for me.”

I’m sorry you don’t understand that MPG is a measure of fuel consumption, not a trip meter metric. Frankly, I don’t think the concept is that hard to grasp.

Hi Pushmi-Pullyu. MPGe is not of great use to me as well. So at least we are on the same page on that. I’m not trying to argue with you. I’m just trying to understand what you propose would be more useful measurements. Where you said: >>”I’m sorry you don’t understand that MPG is a measure of fuel consumption, not a trip meter metric. Frankly, I don’t think the concept is that hard to grasp.” You were replying to where I said, right before you cutoff the quote, “in terms of miles / gas used”. So how is miles driven divided by gas used not a measure of fuel consumption? Since MPG is miles driven / gas used, we are in agreement. I said nothing about a trip meter metric. I’m not sure, but I think where I misunderstood your perspective could be the that mpg figures for PHEV’s should be kept strictly to cs mpg? That is, mpg returned in charge sustained mode. If so, help me understand why this should be more important to me than total miles / total gas used. I’m much more interested reducing gas fuel consumption than kwh electricity consumption for reasons explained in… Read more »

Edit, where I said:

>> ” CS MPG doesn’t get me this and neitehr does MPGe”

I mean, “CS MPG doesn’t get me this without gathering a few other metrics and doing more calculations, and neither does MPGe.”

Total mpg gets makes it easier to get to the bottom line of how much less this car consumes vs the previous and potential future cars, in terms of the resource I’d most like to use less of.

Nate asked:

“So how is miles driven divided by gas used
not a measure of fuel consumption?”

When the miles driven includes miles powered by electricity, it’s no longer accurate to describe it as “a measure of fuel consumption”. Mixing the two energy sources makes it merely a measure of how far you drive using both electricity and fuel, with no indication of how many miles you got from which. Thus, the data is pretty useless for any comparison purposes, other than perhaps bragging rights for how little gas you burned on the trip. And all the BEV drivers are gonna laugh at your “bragging rights” since they use no gasoline/diesel at all!

“Since MPG is miles driven / gas used, we are in agreement.”

If you’re attempting to be obnoxious, you’re succeeding.

>>”bragging rights for how little gas you burned on the trip” Less interested in a single trip than I am in a mid to long term trends. Also, I’m not interested in bragging. I am interested in describing why it is useful purpose to me – hope you read that part. I said nothing about specifics because the purpose is not to brag. I can give more specifics if you like, but that is beside the point. Another useful metric for owners is total gas used over the lifetime or if usage changed over the lifetime, during a period of similar usage. The Volt is capable of tracking this for you over 2 time periods, and I had kept one going since new, but unfortunately someone else reset it. However, since I still have lifetime mpg from onstar data as a measurement of total miles / total gas used, I only need one quick easy calculation to get that. >>”and all the BEV drivers are gonna laugh at your “bragging rights” since they use no gasoline/diesel at all!” No, I’ve had similar discussions with other BEV, PHEV, and non plugged Hybrid owners. There hasn’t been a misunderstanding about “bragging”, just… Read more »
>>””When the miles driven includes miles powered by electricity, it’s no longer accurate to describe it as “a measure of fuel consumption.” I understand your point, and if I understand correctly you like mpg kept to cs mpg. However, I agree with more with Voltstats line of thinking than yours in their mpg description: “Simply total miles driven divided by total gallons of gas burned, although since the electricity is counted as “free” it doesn’t give a true picture of the energy used. On the other hand, this is literally accurate” CS mpg is no less helpful without even more additional information, namely % on electric. Considering I’m way more comfortable with the source and cost of my electricity than I am with the cost and source of my gas, the cs mpg stat has become less of an interest over time. Also, note many PHEV’s blur the lines between gas and ev miles. I like the idea of how the gen I Volt’s EV mode is truly that. But, given my main objective I’d consider PHEV’s that blur this EV vs CS mode line, as long as the end result was a vehicle that drastically reduced gas usage compared… Read more »

>>”If you’re attempting to be obnoxious, you’re succeeding”.

Very sorry you think that. Not trying to argue with you. I think you’ve got some good ideas and thoughts on other topics. If I didn’t, I would never bother to reply and ask clarify where you are coming from.

I was trying (maybe to hard) to try to find some common ground on this topic, explain my interest, and get your ideas on better metrics. So far it might just be that we both think MPGe isn’t all that useful.

I use to be interested in a lot more stats during the first year of ownership, but as time go by total miles per total gas used just happens to be what ends up being the bottom line for me.

“It’s an amazing world when a rocket ship from the future like the BMW i8, can return 3x, 4x, 5x the mpg of its competitive class.”

Great article, but, where’s the Tesla Model S in this competitive class? Are you not including it? My Tesla Model S P85 averages 103MPG. (331Wh/mile over 33,000 miles) So your car returns 1x the mpg of my car.

I have to agree with Pushmi-Pullyu. I have to assume that the mi/kWh doesn’t include miles driven on gas in it’s calculation, so it doesn’t make sense to include miles driven on electricity in the calculation of mpg. If you charged the car with 1 kWh of electricity and then drove the car 1000 miles on gas no one would accept that you were getting 1000 miles/kWh, and switching it around doesn’t make any more sense. An indication of the percent of distance driven on electricity would be a more reasonable statistic.

It makes perfect sense if you are referencing the amount of gasoline consumed in the context of reducing gasoline consumption.

In other words, the i8 has all the benefits of an ICE vehicle (fast, readily available refueling everywhere) but still only consumes 1 gallon of gas for every hundred miles traveled.

While it’s true that a BEV would consume zero gasoline, it’s also true that a BEV refuels much more slowly.

Spider Dan says:

“In other words, the i8 has all the benefits of an ICE vehicle (fast, readily available refueling everywhere) but still only consumes 1 gallon of gas for every hundred miles traveled.”

Peder only got 99 MPG equivalent most likely because he was cruising around the city of Carlsbad at 30mph in Grandma mode just using battery electricity. That kind of thing is sometimes called hypermiling.

The official EPA combined city/hwy rating for BMW i8 is 76 MPGe, so Peder must be driving very carefully (slowly) in the city only, taking short trips of 15 miles or less so that the gas engine won’t consume fuel and ruin the 100 mile per gallon fairy tale.

Whenever somebody takes the car out on the freeway and hammers it for 2 or 3 hours straight, they most likely won’t even get the 76 MPGe EPA rating. Traveling at high speed in ICE only mode the car will be lucky to get 30-35 Miles Per Gallon.

Not 100.

I drive a Volt (and my wife has a Leaf) and something I often find myself doing is looking at my range and kilo-watt-hours used when I drive to the store, movies, park, etc. And when I get home I ask myself “could I have made this trip in a Ford Energi car without using gas? What about a BMW i8?” The answer to that question varies a lot. But here’s the funny thing. Most of the time, the Ford Energi would have worked with a few miles to spare. The i8 on the other hand, considerably less often. Being the EPA rating of 15 vs. 19, it is surprising how much that extra 4 miles of range counts. At least for where I live and drive. That’s why I think any PHEV should strive to get 20 miles of EPA range as a bare minimum. With 15 miles of range, that means you can only drive up to 7.5 miles away from home unless you plan to charge while away. I’m also a huge fan of the PHEV design and I think at this stage of the game, I’d rather have a good PHEV than a pure-EV even with… Read more »

Have to agree with Pushmi-Pullyu , Lindsay Patten and a couple others who posted protests to this 99 MPG madness.

Okay… Someone drives around at low speed in electric only mode for a month so that the gas engine seldom or never kicks in. The car is being propelled by electricity the vast majority of the time. After a month the trip odometer shows the car getting 99 miles per gallon of gas.

Can’t anyone see how ridiculous this claim is ? The BMW software is programmed to include electrical miles driven with miles driven using just gasoline. No wonder the car gets such fabulous gas mileage ! Ninety per cent or more of miles attributed to gasoline are actually being driven with an electric motor !!

Sad to think, but true, somebody over at BMW actually cooked up this bogus dashboard malware.

Its not like Peder has never owened a BEV. His perspective on this is valid.

It doesn’t look like he limited his usage, as he’s used to take on trips and didn’t restrict it to low speeds or not taking the opportunity to get on the accelerator. This is evident from the pictures, his replies to comments and the story itself.

What is a more useful metric, if your ev miles are powered by solar or clean sources, and if your primary purpose is minimizing gas consumption? The bottom line comes down to total miles divided by total gallons. I’m interested (and open minded) in why this is not an interesting metric for owners. Let me know.

Nate said:

“The bottom line comes down to total miles divided by total gallons. I’m interested (and open minded) in why this is not an interesting metric for owners. Let me know.”

Nate, we applaud all the gas-powered miles you replace with electric powered miles. We just object to you using the term “MPG” to report miles powered by electric motors rather than a gasoline engine. When we use the term MPG, we know it’s a measure of the gasoline consumed to power a car a certain distance. When you use the term, it’s rather meaningless. We don’t know how much gas you used, we don’t know how many kWh you used, we don’t even know how far you traveled. Using it your way, “MPG” is reduced to a meaningless number useful only for bragging rights.

We suggest you come up with a metric which actually fits what you’re trying to measure. “MPG” ain’t it.

I described what metric is useful to me and why. I believe I asked you earlier what a metric would be preferable given my objective, and didn’t get it, so I asked jmac for the same. Still open to ideas.

In keeping with the label “Consumption” I would suggest that gallons of gas consumed and kWh consumed would be an appropriate metric for gas-conscious drivers. I think there’s room there for:
3g + 100kWh Consumption
That way you know exactly how much gas you have used.

I disagree. If your main concern is reducing gas usage, overall mpg is your main interest in a phev. If aer or cs mpg do not fit your driving pattern, your overall mpg will suck.

Constuctive altrernative?

According to the story, this BNW was only driven about 75 miles per week or about 10 miles per day at an average speed of about 30 mph.

I guess the lesson here is that if you don’t exceed the 14 mi. electric only range of the vehicle and drive carefully (no wheelies) you can get the 99 mpge.

But once you leave town the mileage goes down. The EPA rates this car at about 76 mpge city/hwy.

If you drive this car hard and fast for several hours, out on the freeway, in full ICE mode, you might be lucky to get 30-35 mpg. That’s pretty far from 100 MPG.

From some of the comments it’s clear that MPGe is being misunderstood or confused with energy consumption for EVs (Kw hours of electic consumption per 100 mi) Here’s an excerpt from a clear, simple explanation from Edmunds about MPGe. ——————————————— “Kilowatt-Hours to MPG-Equivalent So how does the EPA get from 32 kWh/100m to 105 MPGe? To create the mpg equivalent, the EPA uses an established energy standard of 115,000 BTUs (British thermal units) per gallon of gasoline. Grossly oversimplified, this means that if you ignited 1 U.S. gallon of unleaded gasoline, it would generate that much heat. To create the same amount of heat, you would need 33.7 kilowatt-hours of electricity. So if the 2014 Ford Focus EV could travel 100 miles on 33.7 kWh of electricity (the energy equivalent of 1 gallon of gasoline), it would receive an mpg equivalency of 100 MPGe. But the Focus EV actually requires slightly less than the 33.7 kWh to travel 100 miles (in this case, 32 kWh), so it received an mpg equivalency rating of 105 MPGe. The EPA label provides both city and highway numbers as well as the overall average fuel economy. For EVs, which tend to do better in… Read more »