VW E-up! And Electromobility Featured In Volkswagen’s ViaVision Magazine

4 years ago by Mark Kane 3

VW e-up! And Electromobility Featured In Volkswagen's ViaVision Magazine

VW e-up! And Electromobility Featured In Volkswagen’s ViaVision Magazine

The electric drives for the e-up! are produced in the Kassel Baunatal plant. A new electric motor and transmission assembly has been specially created in the transmission plant.

The electric drives for the e-up! are produced in the Kassel Baunatal plant. A new electric motor and transmission assembly has been specially created in the transmission plant.

In the latest Volkswagen ViaVision magazine, the German automaker featured its first production electric vehicle e-up! and some electromobility topics.

“Following a foreword by the new Board Member for Development of the Volkswagen brand, Dr. Heinz-Jakob Neußer, ViaVision explores all aspects of e-mobility, from batteries, through plugs and magnetic fields and back to the first electric research vehicle which was based on the first Golf and developed as early as 1976.”

The magazine describes, in detail, electric motors, battery, recuperation and the first electric Golf prototypes developed in 1976.

The battery systems for the e-up! are produced in-house in series in Brunswick. Forty employees produce 11,000 units per year.

The battery systems for the e-up! are produced in-house in series in Brunswick. Forty employees produce 11,000 units per year.

Like Nissan, Tesla and BMW, Volkswagen is producing electric drives and battery packs in-house.  As the automaker explains in ViaVision:

“Next to the design, the drive is the main component that determines the customer’s relationship with his car. One could say the drive is like the heart of a car. Many customers buy a Volkswagen, among other reasons, because over many decades we have proven our compentence in drives. From the start it was important to us that we rely on autonomous development and production of alternative drives so that we could ensure all future Volkswagens with alternative drives are exemplary in every aspect. This is why we have worked intensively on the development of e-motors and battery systems, and developed the necessary production competence in our Kassel and Brunswick plants.”

According to the magazine “The battery systems for the e-up! are produced in-house in series in Brunswick. Forty employees produce 11,000 units per year,” which could indicate production capacity level. At 11,000 units, VW must sell almost 1,000 electric vehicle a month every month – this is rather ambitious taking into account relatively high price of e-up!, but it should be possible together with the e-Golf that will come next year.

Another important thing is that VW’s electric cars don’t have liquid cooling of the battery.  The German manufacturer argues:

“Cooling is not necessary: in driving mode the battery does not heat up beyond the permitted temperature range, even when temperatures are high outside the car.”

The high-voltage battery of the e-up! is installed in the underbody of the vehicle.

The high-voltage battery of the e-up! is installed in the underbody of the vehicle.

Several additional interesting facts can be found directly in Volkswagen’s ViaVision magazine.

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3 responses to "VW E-up! And Electromobility Featured In Volkswagen’s ViaVision Magazine"

  1. Dr. Kenneth Noisewater says:

    ~81Wh/kg? Lame. Try tripling that.

    1. Spec says:

      Well that is at a pack level including wiring, BMS, container, structural members for crash protection, etc.

  2. Bloggin says:

    VW and Ford are in a fight in Europe, so it’s almost certain that a Fiesta EV is coming.

    Based on reports around the concept with RWD, in-wheel motors and underbody batteries, it’s due on the road by MY2015. Expect the same update for the Focus EV also, since both cars don’t get a new gen until my 2017/18.

    Which could also be why Ford puts little ‘focus’ on pushing this current first gen Focus Electric.

    We could also see a C-Max Electric as it uses the same platform as the Focus Electric.