Video: Tesla Model S Battery Swapping, Supercharging and the Double Bind

4 years ago by Electric CarsTV 10

What’s a double bind?  Honestly, we had no clue until we came across this Tesla-related video that describes it as a creative form of coercion often used in advertising.

Tesla Teases The Supercharger Before The Webcast

Tesla Teases The Supercharger Before The Webcast

As it turns out, Tesla CEO Elon Musk must be well aware of the double bind, as he used it when showcasing Tesla’s battery swapping technology.  (check out the details and videos of that process in action here)

Remember when Musk stated:

“The only decision you need to make, when you come to one of our Tesla stations, is do you prefer faster or free?”

That there is the double bind.

Still not making sense?  Watch the video, then it most certainly will.

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10 responses to "Video: Tesla Model S Battery Swapping, Supercharging and the Double Bind"

  1. David Murray says:

    Hmmm… Not sure what to make of this. I mean, if you have a Tesla and you drive into a supercharging station you really do only have two choices. You can charge for free, or pay for fast. I suppose the 3rd option is to back out of the station and go somewhere else.

    1. Richard Joash Tan says:

      or the 4th option is all of the above

  2. Jay Cole says:

    I really didn’t know what I was going to see when I first saw this story published (no I don’t see all the stories first hand – we don’t have that kind of control around here, lol) …and its a little different from the norm to be sure.

    But I will say (and maybe this is just for me), as a person who literally reads several hundred stories, press releases, vids, etc on plug-ins everyday, I quite enjoyed the distraction of this piece as it loosely ties into the Musk presentation on swapping.

    Not sure how it is going to play for the wider audience/casual reader, but the ‘escape’ for 7-8 minutes for myself was nice…regardless if you buy into their argument.

    1. Cavaron says:

      I enjoy to read/watch something about electric cars AND learn some facts about other stuff like business psychology along the way 🙂 Kinda widens your personal horizont.

  3. Bennyd says:

    How many consumers don’t bat an eye filling a large SUV with 100.00 worth of gas? The majority of Tesla owners who will pay for the speed of a quick replacement will probably do it for business reasons and it will be tax deductible. The rest of us will choose the free option and enjoy a cup of coffee and enjoy the trip…

    1. DrInnovaiton says:

      Hmm lets see. I get .55 per mile for using my vehicle on a trip. If I get 200 miles from the swapped battery and it costs me < 60 to swap and I get $110 I'd say it more than covers the cost of swapping and the actual wear an tear on the car. Heck I'd sway out my "owed" pack at the start of the trip so save the wear/tear on what I own.

      Any know if the Tesla a milage/charge meter that is PER battery pack? I would see the resale value of a used tesla with 100K miles, but only 60K on the pack would be quite different than one with 80K on both car and pack.

  4. ev4ever says:

    Battery swapping is a cool concept but I would rather wait 20 to 30 minutes for a free charge. I say just add more superchargers. Roughly 280 miles on a single charge is a good distance. After driving that long I would need a restroom break and grab a bite to eat. If I’m in that big of a rush to get to a location I would probably just fly.

  5. DrInnovaiton says:

    Sorry, but you still don’t have a much of a clue about what is a double bind. The video get the terminology wrong.

    Tesla is not offering double bind. The user making a choice is not wrong in either case with is the classic double bind. It also fails as a positive double bind because there is a real choice to be made (time vs money) and either choice is valid but leads to different outcomes. It is a type of a false dichotomy or false choice fallacy because it implies the use already chose a tesla with supercharger/swapping ability. The people in the video are misusing the terminology, probably to sound clever. A false dichotomy is a common sales gimmick but not the same as a double bind.

    Musk’s use was excellent and not necessarily a gimmick and not necessarily a false dichotomy — he was talking to an audience that he was speaking to tesla owners and explaining a real choice for those owners. To those of us not owning a tesla there is a bit of a false dichotomy, given the third choice is not to own a tesla, but the real point of this approach, and why it works for musk, is different from a double bind or a false dichotomy — as in this case people for whom the false dichotomy is meaningful, those that don’t own a tesla, are instantly aware they don’t even get to make this choice so they should upgrade to a vehicle that does given these two different but good choices.

    But hey, they second guy got to talk about his hypnotherapy and the first guy came across as knowing something.. . guess that is why they think they are experts. Musk’s use was way deeper and way more effective because its NOT a double bind or a sales gimmick. That dear readers, is why he is genius and they are wannabes .

  6. Roy_H says:

    The video is foolish and not worth watching. This whole “double bind” issue of only having 2 choices ignores the fact that the person has already purchased a Tesla car, and has made the decision to come to the supercharger station to re-charge. Then they make a big deal about “choice 3” to go away! Stupid.

  7. Sergey_L says:

    The 3rd option in that case is “unable to find a supercharger station”.