Video: Tesla CEO Musk Constantly Proves Critics Wrong

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 9

It seems for every hurdle in the way of widespread electric vehicle adoption, Tesla creates a solution.

Tesla Model S "Electric Refueling" Vs The Traditional Gas Station Stop

Tesla Model S “Electric Refueling” Vs The Traditional Gas Station Stop

With Supercharging, the Model S fills rapidly while soon being able to travel about the country on free fills.  This was Tesla’s solution for the critics out there who say electric vehicles are mainly only useful as urban commuters.  With a vast Supercharging network, the Model S will be ideal for even vacation travel.

Then there’s battery swapping.  With this, Tesla will overcome the hurdle of lengthy charging times (even though a Supercharger can fill a Model S in 20 minutes).  Battery swapping is, as demonstrated, is quicker than fueling a conventional vehicle and it’ll cost a bit less, too.  Problem solved.

The next hurdle—and it’s one that Tesla hopes to overcome with its upcoming BMW 3-Series priced electric—is cost.

Since Tesla CEO Musk seems to have no problem taking on all challenges and then proving the world wrong, we don’t doubt that this “EVs are too expensive” criticism will be thrown out the window by Tesla, too.

Beyond price, what’s the next hurdle electric vehicles will face?  And will Musk/Tesla be able to solve that, too?

Source: You Tube

Tags: , , , ,

9 responses to "Video: Tesla CEO Musk Constantly Proves Critics Wrong"

  1. Stuart22 says:

    Not so fast to crown the battery swap scheme as a victory. So far all we have is a staged, highly controlled demonstration of the idea which is a far cry from a working reality. And there’s the question of whether it will catch on – the idea failed in Israel; why would it work in America?

    1. kdawg says:

      How fast it catches on or is used it TBD. Regarding the speed, yes it’s faster in miles/sec. However it’s not cheaper. You are paying for that speed.

  2. taser54 says:

    Nothing like continuous articles on the cult of personality. This is never done with the chairmen of other car companies.

    1. Sam says:

      The chairmen of other car companies aren’t pushing new innovative technologies. If Elon Musk were developing another ICE vehicle he would likely get a lot less press coverage.

      1. kdawg says:

        I thought it was a sarcastic statement. For example look at Carlos Ghosn.

  3. kdawg says:

    I would like to know where Elon’s goals are set at.

    Hopefully at a min, they are:

    200 miles of range
    $30K max price
    DC quick charging included

    1. Josh says:

      That $30k will be base price in 2012 dollars. And it may even be after the $7,500 tax credit, which probably won’t last through one full year of Gen III production. Model S and X will have eaten up at least 100,000 of the 200,000 manufacturers allotment by then.

      The 200 miles min and Supercharging is a given at this point. Battery swapping is probably on the fence right now. I am wondering if the 17″ touch screen will stay the same. I hope they don’t try to shrink it down. All of that screen real estate is what makes it so useable.

      It will be more fun to speculate on the next gen Roadster built on the same platform. I have heard a rumor that he won’t build it unless it is < 2.0 0 – 60…

      1. kdawg says:

        I don’t think Elon’s target date for the Blue Star too far out. He said he will only be with 1 company after 5 years and he is not leaving Tesla until the Blue Star is a reality. So lets say it’s within 5 years. Tesla only plans to sell about 20k/year now, so that will only be 1/2 their allowed 200K, as you said. That leaves 100K for Blue Star sales, which I don’t think they’ll crank out that many in their first year. I’m more worried that the $7,500 will disappear due to political changes. But even if it does disappear, I’d pay $37,500 for a 200mile BEV that doesn’t look frumpy and has quick-charging.

        Regarding the touchscreen, I actually think its too big. I’d rather see a slightly smaller one that is integrated into the dash, and looks like it belongs. The one in the Model S now, looks like you should take it with you when you leave.

        I’m not too interested in Roadsters or all the other electric super cars. They are somewhat fun articles to read about, but don’t really get my juice pumping as something I may actually own/operate myself.

        If the Blue Star isn’t out in the next 5 years, I’ll be looking back towards GM for either their 200mile BEV, or a Gen 2 Volt.

  4. Anon says:

    If the Roadster is waaaaay lighter, he’ll have a chance. But batteries and weight go hand in hand…. Hmm.