Video: Complex Operation of Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Dumbed Down to the Extreme

4 years ago by Electric CarsTV 15

Ever wonder how the plug-in hybrid system in the upcoming Mitsubishi Outlander Plug-In Hybrid operates?  Well, it’s time to wonder no more because Mitsubishi Motors has released an overly simplified video explaining the operation of its PHEV system, as well as several schematics and even this operational summary of sorts:

See-Through Outlander PHEV

See-Through Outlander PHEV

The Mitsubishi Plug-in Hybrid EV System provides energy conservation, and at the same time offers driving that is comfortable, safe and reliable.
When driving at medium- to low-speeds, the Mitsubishi Plug-in Hybrid EV System stays in EV Mode, driving the vehicle through its electric motors using electricity from the drive battery.

When the remaining energy in the drive battery gets low, the Mitsubishi Plug-in Hybrid EV System’s switches to Series Hybrid Mode where its gasoline engine automatically starts and generates power for the electric motors.

When driving at high speeds, the Mitsubishi Plug-in Hybrid EV System switches to Parallel Hybrid Mode which also uses the power of the gasoline engine to drive the vehicle as its engine operates more efficiently than its electric motors at high RPM.

Furthermore, when a vehicle with the Mitsubishi Plug-in Hybrid EV System is decelerating, it switches to the Regenerative Mode which uses the motors as power generators to recharge the drive battery. In this way, the Mitsubishi Plug-in Hybrid EV System optimally controls each of the driving modes so it provides the versatility to drive as a 100% electric vehicle, use the engine to charge the drive battery, or drive using the motors and the engine at the same time, based on driving conditions.

After this informational overload, surely even the little kiddies of the world will understand the basic methods in which the PHEV system function in the upcoming Outlander Plug-In Hybrid.

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15 responses to "Video: Complex Operation of Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Dumbed Down to the Extreme"

  1. GeorgeS says:

    Sounds like Voltec with the addition of electric drive in the rear…..but it can’t be cuz GM has a patent….and I don’t think Mitsu is leasing it. So what can it be??

    Search me.

    All I know is that GM could do this in about 2 seconds with their current Voltec drive system just by adding an electric drive to the rear wheels.

    1. Airton says:

      and I’m sure they will! but it looks like Mitsu beat them to the punch.
      In a 2 car household this SUV plus a EV only 2nd car would be ideal.

      1. Future Leaf Driver says:

        GM will release a similar offering with 2 wheel drive only, just not until 2016.

        Until then, Mitsubishi will own this segment of the EV market..

    2. evnow says:

      “If you had invented Facebook. You would’ve invented Facebook.”

      To quote Lutz, Voltec is not capable of driving bigger cars.

    3. evnow says:

      I should add – there is nothing unique about any of the EV technologies. The question is whether a company has enough faith in it to bring it to the market. Afterall several DIYers have made extremely fast EVs – as well as ones with a long range. But it took a Tesla to actually productionize it.

    4. scottf200 says:

      Not the same because it needs the ICE/gas_engine for hard acceleration and highway speeds per the video. So it is a PHEV and not an EREV like the Volt (battery only until it runs out). None the less they seem to have have made a nice package. The built in inverter is nice (per video). Ala Via Motors.

      1. scottf200 says:

        Not sure I understand the recharging the batteries mode. Isn’t electricity from the wall typically considered a lost less expensive and making it with a gas generator (like 1/6th the cost). I’m wondering what that mode does to the MPGs as well. Curious.

        1. Future Leaf Driver says:

          The process of batteries recharging is similar to Hold mode on 2013 Volts.

          1. Joule Thief says:

            Not quite. The “Save” mode in the Outlander is the same as “Hold” mode in the Volt. In this mode it’s Charge Sustaining to preserve the SOC.

            “Charge” mode in the Outlander is exactly that, a mode where the ICE actually replenishes the SOC. It’s similar to DC fast charging, you get about 80% charge in about 40min. The Volt only behaves this way in Mountain Mode when below about 40% SOC.

            There’s not much practical value for it here in the States (as Scott says you’ll get worse MPG overall). It’s more useful in Europe where some cities (i.e. London) have limitations on driving CO2 emission vehicles into the city. With this mode, if you have a low SOC you can increase it to get back into EV mode.before getting into the city. Mitsu’s other example for using this mode is to charge up the day before leaving a camp site early so as not to disturb others ;).

            So we have Charge Depleting, Charge Sustaining, and now Charge Replenishing? I have not seen this feature on any other PHEV as of yet, so far as I know it’s unique to the Outlander.

    5. KeiJidosha says:

      “All I know is that GM could do this in about 2 seconds with their current Voltec drive system just by adding an electric drive to the rear wheels.”

      But they haven’t. The Outlander PHEV is in production and the GM MPV5 is only a concept.

    6. Anderlan says:

      Yes, sure, because plugin series hybrid has no prior art before Voltec, whatever. I’m sure the Voltec patent has some specific wrinkles that Mitsu tried to avoid. Yes. GM could do this. But making a new model vehicle is a time-consuming big deal. We need more and better PHEV/EREVs. We need competition. ALL auto companies need to be investing in making the best EREVs and EVs they possibly can. It’s a good thing. Screw patents.

    7. anderlan says:

      Yes, sure, because plugin series hybrid has no prior art before Voltec, whatever. I’m sure the Voltec patent has some specific wrinkles that Mitsu tried to avoid. Yes. GM could do this. But making a new model vehicle is a time-consuming big deal. We need more and better PHEV/EREVs. We need competition. ALL auto companies need to be investing in making the best EREVs and EVs they possibly can. It’s a good thing. Screw patents.

  2. Pepijn says:

    I see no difference to the hybride Peugeot 508. 4×4, fulltime ev (zero emmision), auto, fast. The Cars system decides wich power to use

  3. Josh says:

    Nice video explanation of their drivetrain, except for the automated voice. The ability to use the battery as a power source could be a real seller for those that use an SUV for more than soccer practice.

    They should apply the same drivetrain for a work truck. The built in generator would be a sell for many contractors. (I know VIA does this, but Mitsu could sell it for less than $80k)

  4. Bill Howland says:

    @Evnow

    Interesting that you quote Lutz since they have a simplified 402 horsepower system for Viamotors, of which he is intimately associatd. Its no where near as complex as the volt’s Synergy Drive (I’m not worried that its called Voltec, its made in Japan and until I hear otherwise for sure to me its an SD), but 402 horsepower is usually big enough for most residential vehicles, even if you’re talking about an Escalade. I just wish they’d start cranking them out.