Video Of Aftermath Of Fatal Tesla Model S Crash In Netherlands

6 months ago by Electric CarsTV 47

Tesla Model S Being Towed Away

Tesla Model S Being Towed Away

FotoMiche published video from the aftermath / clean up of the fatal Tesla Model S crash in the Netherlands.

Of note is that Tesla released a preliminary statement on its findings from it investigation of the wreck:

β€œWe are working with the authorities to establish the facts of the incident and offer our full cooperation. Thus far, we can confirm from the car’s logs that Autopilot was not engaged at any time during the drive cycle and that, consistent with the damage that was observed after the vehicle struck the tree, the vehicle was being driven at more than 155 kph (96 MPH).”

According to the video description, technicians from Tesla Nederland were almost immediately on the scene to try to determine the cause of the wreck.

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47 responses to "Video Of Aftermath Of Fatal Tesla Model S Crash In Netherlands"

  1. john says:

    Doesn’t really matter what you’re driving. You hit a tree at almost 100mph, it’s going to end badly.

    Thoughts go out to the family.

  2. speculawyer says:

    96 MPH into a tree. Yeah, not much a car can do to protect the occupants in that situation.

  3. MDEV says:

    Why every Tesla crash around the world is important for Inside EVs??
    Is like yellow press.

    1. sven says:

      Perhaps Elon Musk brought some of the heightened scrutiny upon Tesla crashes when he declared that the Model S was the “safest car ever,” and arrogantly boasted about how safe it was for passengers in all sorts high-speed crashes and other devastating crashes, making the Model S seem invincible and implying that its passengers were impervious to suffering serious permanent injuries in these crashes.

      Here’s one example:
      Addressing an approving audience in Mountain View, Calif., Musk emphasized his vehicles’ performance and safety record, boasting that Teslas have driven a total of 344 million miles without “a serious permanent injury.”

      “And there have been some pretty crazy crashes,” he said. “There was a guy who drove through two concrete walls at 110 mph.”

      He used to tell people the car was safe unless it was driven off a cliff, he joked.

      “Then someone drove it off a cliff,” he said. “Fine!”

        1. JIMIJON says:

          It’s a Crying Shame that these things happen. Whats all this Crap got to do with a possible “Death Wish” Here?? Hit That tree at the same spot, with a “Tank” full speed & I Guarantee that it will not Move ! Did really expect the car to save this guy?…duuuu

      1. Terawatt says:

        Do you actually disputes that the Model S was the safest car ever (it’s not any more, as Model X is even safer) – or do you merely wish it wasn’t? I can’t tell from your irrelevant moaning.

        1. Four Electrics says:

          There are cars with a better safety record than the Teslas. The Honda Odyssey, for example, hasn’t recorded a single fatality in five years, and it is by far a more popular car. Several other, much more popular cars boast zero fatalities.

          That said, I believe they are among the safest cars, especially given the power they offer and the type of driving they encourage.

          1. Get Real says:

            RIDICULOUS comparison!

            Oddysey is a family style minivan and a relatively low performance vehicle compared to the Model S which is basically the most common VERY high performance car on the road today and is sometimes driven as such.

          2. MDEV says:

            As I said pure poison hate against an American car and great product. Honda Odyssey “KILL PEOPLE TOO” no Honda’s fault just accidents. Please google any brand of car, it is expected to happen.

            http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article54002670.html

        2. Mikael says:

          Not the Model S nor the Model X has ever been the worlds safest car. The Model S did pretty average on the Euro NCAP.

          Elon Musk has been doing a great job in the PR department to actually get some people to belive that they build the worlds safest cars.

          But there is no doubt that the cars are very safe and no one should fear to put their loved ones in it and that is an amazing feat by a new car company, safety is not easy and it takes a lot of hard work, talent and experience to try to fight with the big boys.

        3. sven says:

          I was addressing the OP’s question of why Tesla crashes receive an inordinate amount of press coverage. It’s like the owner of the Titanic bragging/declaring that it unsinkable and having people complain when the press covered its sinking. Did these people expect the press not to cover the Titanic’s sinking, since many other ships sink and they don’t read about them in the press. If Elon got all that free press when be bragged about how incredibly safe the Model S was compared to other cars, then press coverage of Tesla crash deaths is the flip side of the coin.

          With regards to whether the Model S is the safest car ever, that’s debatable. It did perform well on the U.S. NHTSA crash test, and slightly below average for recent model year Executive class cars on the European NCAP crash test. On the NCAP test all recent year Executive class cars received 5-star ratings, but Model S received the lowest scores in that class for Adult Protection, Child Protection, Pedestrian Protection, and Safety Assist.

          http://www.euroncap.com/en/ratings-rewards/latest-safety-ratings/?selectedClasses=1196&allProtocols=false&selectedMake=0&selectedMakeName=Select%20a%20make&selectedModel=0&includeFullSafetyPackage=true&includeStandardSafetyPackage=true&selectedModelName=All&selectedProtocols=24370,1472,5910,5931&allClasses=false&allDriverAssistanceTechnologies=false&selectedDriverAssistanceTechnologies=

          But designing a car to get high scores on a crash test is a noble achievement, but real world results are the ultimate test. There are a number of models on the road that have zero driver death rates, unfortunately the Model S is not one of them. Note however, that the most recent model year cars in the IIHS survey is 2011.

          http://www.cnbc.com/2015/01/29/record-9-models-have-zero-highway-deaths-iihs-says.html

      2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        Hey, sven, did Elon run over your cat or something?

        When other auto makers brag about their cars, that’s taking pride in their work. But according to you, when Elon brags about Tesla cars, it’s “arrogant boasting”.

        Gee, no bias here, is there? πŸ™„

        1. Get Real says:

          I see that after a brief respite that sven has gone back to his normal carpet bombing mode to push his anti-Tesla agenda.

          1. Nix says:

            His H2 Fuel cell vehicle must have left him stranded between H2 fueling stations again.

            Those H2 fuel cell fanatics get pretty bitter.

      3. MDEV says:

        And how ones it compares with other automakers? Volvo say for years they are the safest car in the world so does Subaru and you don’t spill the same poisoning hate about them.

    2. mx9000 says:

      Well, let’s submit stories every time a high end BMW or Mercedes crashes too.

  4. pjwood1 says:

    Thanks for posting the video. It is sobering, without being morbid. If this man did everything right, he’d have missed that tree, many trees, by maybe 6 feet.

    Cue up that portion of Tesla’s culture, that will say “speed kills” and humans shouldn’t drive “2 ton death machines”. Whether automation and driver disengagement, or hyper-engagement and poor judgement were the cause, this won’t be the last crash.

    1. sven says:

      If this man did everything right, except for driving 100 mph on a posted 50 mph tree-lined road, he’d have missed that tree, many trees, by maybe 6 feet.

      There, I fixed it for you. πŸ˜‰

      1. pjwood1 says:

        Speed or judgement, Sven?

        1. Get Real says:

          Sven has neither.

          1. sven says:

            Get Real, you fail to give me the validation that I so desperately crave. πŸ™

        2. sven says:

          Both. With those nearby trees and no guardrails, that road was wrong place to drive 100 mph. Not that a 4-lane wide divided interstate with guard rail is the right place to drive 100 mph, but it is a safer/better place to drive at those speeds.

          1. sven says:

            I forgot to say that if the man did everything right, he wouldn’t have driven 100 mph on a public road in the first place.

      2. Djoni says:

        I would say that PJ probably meant that when he write about doing everything right.
        Obviously driving within the prescribed speed would have been hard to go off road and hit anything, unless being very distracted or else.
        Sad, like any death.
        Even more sad, because it’s an EV, it will make it new to this site.

        1. pjwood1 says:

          I did. Just trying to say anyone blaming such bad decision making on speed is, in my opinion, miss-guided. One of my fears, looking at an accident like this, is an airbag triggered by a deer, which then makes avoiding a tree much more difficult/impossible.

          1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

            If the Model S had hit a tree, even a very large and very solid tree, at 50 MPH, then it’s nearly certain the driver would not only have survived; he’d likely have walked away without serious injury.

            When they say “Speed kills”, that’s not just an empty slogan. It’s a pretty succinct summary of the fact that kinetic energy increases as the square of the speed.

  5. ffbj says:

    I am not getting on Tesla because they make a very fast and powerful car, because someone would anyway and someone would crash into a tree at high speed with it.

    Part of the problem is there is something, call it the ev factor that clouds peoples judgement at high speed. In other words the cues your mind/body normally associates with that speed are not apparent, giving you invalid data, or false impressions as to your actual speed.
    This is a known phenomenon and can be trained away to an extent, through practice, you can realize you are going much faster than you think you are.
    Catching that transition moment when you’re going subconscious in your driving, which is about 65% of the time for highway driving. Then if something abrupt occurs you bounce back alert already to react. But unless you consciously retrain yourself you will susceptible to be just driving blithely along through the forest at twice the posted speed and your subconscious is asleep at the wheel. Ev drivers need to reprogram their own autopilots.

    So people are whizzing along at 80 mph thinking they are going 50 mph. We drive by feel and instinct, and need to retrain them when purchasing a high powered ev.
    Donna Nobis Pacem:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fhJ6XrZ4jg

    1. SparkEV says:

      Cruise control. It’s been available for almost half a century, yet many (most?) people refuse to use it. I’m using it almost all the time. Yeah, people past me doing far faster than the speed limit, but I will not be getting a speeding ticket. In fact, SparkEV has allowed me the longest time of not getting a speeding ticket, and it’s not unsafe when you’re in company of big rigs that are at similar speeds.

    2. DangerHV says:

      ffbj, you bring up an extremely valid point that should be addressed by EV automakers. I noticed this while driving my dad’s Buick Regal after years in a Sentra then Civic. I’m a very conservative driver and found myself 10-20 mph over the limit several times before I noticed my speed and let off the pedal. (I have no speeding tickets in all 35 years of driving)
      Electric motors are great for many reasons, and silence is one of the nicest. An ICE engines’ sound and vibrations give a tacit idea of speed after a bit of driving time with a new car. This would take quite the trained ear to pick this up in an EV.
      Possible ideas… A larger display, higher on the dash? Maybe on the edge of the windshield so it’s just below line-of-sight? Where technically possible, some warning of over limit?(user can even set amount) And of course the head-up display. What else…?
      This tragic fatality may or may not have been avoided, but some simple things can be done to increase safety on the “human side” of the ICE to EV transition.

      1. Phaedrus says:

        In the i3, you get over speed limits very easily. I have set an alarm sound that warns me when going over 30mph, so when I drive in city environments I will get a warning when I exceed 30mph. Saves me some tickets but also maybe some pedestrian or bikers life.

      2. Hauer says:

        If you cannot see that you are dring THAT fast on this kind of road with trees all around you, you should not drive at all.

    3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      ffbj said:

      “So people are whizzing along at 80 mph thinking they are going 50 mph.”

      Somehow I don’t think that’s the problem here. Someone going 96+ MPH in a 50 MPH zone, and furthermore doing that on what appears to be a two-lane road with no shoulders and with trees lining the road, is clearly engaging in the risky behavior of a thrill ride.

      Well, when people deliberately engage in risky behavior, sometimes they get hurt or killed. It’s a tragedy when that happens, but it’s pretty silly to suggest the car wasn’t safe enough. If the car had been safer, they would have just driven faster to get that same thrill.

      The only real lesson here is “Speed kills”.

    4. Nix says:

      ffbj — I know what you are talking about, but that phenomena isn’t unique to EV’s. If you step out of any typical older economy car, and then jump into any brand new high horsepower luxury sedan that is geared for the Autobahn, and you will experience the exact same thing.

      This accident doesn’t appear to be an example of that happening.

      The visual feedback from buzzing by all those trees that close to the road, would more than make up for the lack of sound feedback from a loud ICE engine. It is inconceivable that he thought he was doing the speed limit.

      1. Nix says:

        (and yes that word means what I think it means….)

        #princessbride

  6. Four Electrics says:

    I imagine that automatic emergency braking did not engage in this case. It’s difficult to create an automatic breaking system that won’t freak out on a swerving tree lined road, but we’ll get there. In this case emergency autosteering would have been more effective, had it existed.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      This is entirely missing the point. The guy was deliberately engaging in risky behavior. It’s been reported that Tesla Autosteer disengages at speeds above 88 MPH.

      The faster the speed, the less time there is to react. That applies to mechanical systems (like steering a car) as well as human reflexes. Even the instant response of a computer program can’t overcome inertia, nor prevent a car from leaving the road when it tries to take a turn at too high a speed.

    2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      When cars become more autonomous, when they start being equipped to take control from the human driver to prevent an accident, then they will slow excessive speed to something much safer. When that happens, those wanting to take a thrill ride will disengage the autonomous driving system, and we’ll still see accidents like this.

      This sort of behavior isn’t going to stop until cars are no longer equipped with steering wheels and foot pedals.

    3. Nix says:

      And someday we will have rocket packs and flying cars, so we can fly right over the trees.

      Meanwhile back in the real world of 2016….

      Complaining that systems that didn’t even exist a decade ago aren’t saving enough stupid drivers from their own silly mistakes, sounds just as silly.

  7. Adam says:

    Please stop reporting these. They are sad and we should give privacy to the families and leave it alone.

  8. Carguy says:

    Hmmm, they must have full employment there. In the USA, one tow truck driver would have taken car of everything.

  9. andre says:

    unfortunately time to time quite reliable planes had problems,even crashed(often by piloting errors…) still more and more people continue to fly….Progress,improving technology is the ultimate Winner.

  10. Johnny04 says:

    I’m a fan of Tesla, but why can’t they tell the exact speed the driver was driving instead of saying “more than”?

  11. Hauer says:

    Why ist worth an article on this site if an idiot crashes his car into the trees at 155km/h?

    This has to stop. Or the public will get the feeling, people are dying exclusively in Teslas.

  12. Nero says:

    Nice to see that the crash scene been cleaned by recovery drivers with help of police and fire fighters. In UK them are leaving all sh!t in the place, debris all over the motorways and country roads after an accidents

  13. Joe says:

    there seems to be a few accidents like this one, where the Tesla Veers off the road. There is a post (Today) in the Public Tesla Forums of a Model X owner parking where the control arm failed. Sine the X and S are essentially the same car, (Drive-trains are essentially the same) I am curious to know whether someone looked at the control arms? If they fail, there will be a lot more accidents.

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