United States Accounts for 70% of Cumulative Global Sales of Plug-In Hybrids and Almost 25% of Pure Electric Vehicles

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 11

The Chevy Volt is Certainly One Reason Why the US Leads the PHEV Charge

The Chevy Volt is Certainly One Reason Why the US Leads the PHEV Charge

After sloshing through more sales figures than we ever thought were available, we’ve come to the conclusion that the United States is digging them plug-ins.

Ford C-Max Energi is Reason Number Two

Ford C-Max Energi is Reason Number Two

We’re not about to bore you with all the figures we poured through to arrive at that conclusion.

Rather, we’ll present 2 highlights that show just where the US stands in the plug-in vehicle charge.

The United States currently accounts for nearly 70% of all the plug-in hybrids sold globally.  That’s a cumulative result, meaning that since the launch of the first mass production plug-in hybrid back in late 2010, the US has bought 70% of the world’s running total of that particular type of vehicle.  In this group is the Chevy Volt and its several siblings (as well as other extended-range electrics), which we don’t usually classify as plug-in hybrids, but here they don’t slot into the next group either.

The other figure is for pure electric vehicles.  Though Japan initially led the world in the segment for some time, it seems the US is catching up quickly.  Japan leads in cumulative sales of pure electrics (since late 2010), grabbing roughly 25% of the global market so far, but the US is hot on Japan’s heels and will likely surpass Japan by the end of 2013.

After that happens, the US will then lead the world in both plug-in categories.  How’s that gonna sit with those naysayers out there who still insist that US buyers have no interest in electric vehicles?

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11 responses to "United States Accounts for 70% of Cumulative Global Sales of Plug-In Hybrids and Almost 25% of Pure Electric Vehicles"

  1. Josh says:

    Just wait until there is a plurality of plug-in SUV and light duty trucks offered in the US, then the numbers could get even more skewed.

    On the BEV front, I would say that the Model S alone has had a lot to do with catching up to Japan. That looks to taper off a bit as most of the S sales will be headed overseas the rest of the year. If the LEAF can keep its momentum, maybe it can pick up the slack.

    1. Curtis says:

      thats where the Outlander Phev comes in and the Concept GR-HEV come in

  2. kdawg says:

    I don’t understand this sentence, ” In this group in the Chevy Volt and its several siblings, which we don’t usually classify as a plug-in hybrid, but it doesn’t slot into the next group either.”

    1. David Murray says:

      I was a bit stumped on that one too.. I’m thinking what they were meaning to say is that they don’t normally put the Volt into the same classification with other plug-in hybrids since it is really an EREV and deserves a category of its own.

      1. Eric Loveday says:

        Precisely David…We’ve tried to clarify it a bit…Sorry for the confusion

  3. Suprise Cat says:

    Thanks to the anti-plugin obsession of Germany’s automobile giants.

  4. Mark H says:

    It looks like 2013 EV numbers in the US will pass the 2012 numbers in 60 days. Though progress is sometimes slow and not all battles are won (Tesla’s dealership fights), it seems like for the most part the EV story continually moves forward with positive stories out weighing the negative ones. Great to see all the new EV entries. And Tesla will win the dealership war in the end.

  5. KenZ says:

    How about on a per-capita basis? Or percentage of cars sold basis?

    1. Kimmi says:

      Here’s some plug-in shares in:

      US – 0,51%
      Germany – 0,14%
      UK – 0,11%
      Canada – 0,11%
      Sweden – 0,75%

      For more info, visit this page: http://www.ev-sales.blogspot.ch/2013/06/markets-roundup-may-2013.html

  6. acevolt says:

    What percentage is just in California?

  7. Cavaron says:

    Just 25% in the pure electric vehicles segment? Ok, let’s say Japan has about 20%… so, where are the other 55% from? Europe has some decent buyers in France, Norway and GB, but I would be surprised if these together would be more than another 20%. What’s the rest? Some quirky Lead-Acid cars in China and India?