U.S.’ First All-Electric Garbage Truck Gets Revealed

3 years ago by Eric Loveday 21

Motiv's All-Electric Garbage Truck

Motiv’s All-Electric Garbage Truck

Motiv is proud to be “under the hood of America’s first all-electric refuse truck.

The City of Chicago contracted with Motiv to build up to 20 of these electric garbage trucks.

Called the ERV (Electric Refuse Vehicle), this electric garbage truck features 10 battery packs.  Its range is 60 miles and it’s got enough juice on board for 70 compaction cycles.

According to Motiv, the truck uses a “Loadmaster 20 cubic yard Excel-S rear loader body and a Crane Carrier chassis furnished by Cumberland Service Center.”

While we don’t know the actual cost of the ERV, we do know that Motive has worked out a bulk order deal in which the more orders placed, the lower the cost.  Basically, it work out so that by the time the tenth order is placed, the cost is actually less than a comparable diesel refuse truck.  And, of course, the cost of fueling this truck is significantly less than a diesel one.

You’ll find specs, images and the full press release on North America’s first all-electric refuse truck below.

Spec Sheet

Spec Sheet

Motiv's All-Electric Garbage Truck

Motiv’s All-Electric Garbage Truck

Motiv's All-Electric Garbage Truck

Motiv’s All-Electric Garbage Truck

trcuk 1truck 2

 

Tags: ,

21 responses to "U.S.’ First All-Electric Garbage Truck Gets Revealed"

  1. Gsned57 says:

    Really? If you buy 10 or more they are cheaper than buying a conventional diesel? I’m a bit skeptical but if true they’ve got a bright future. It would be nice to not hear the trash truck coming from half a mile away anymore.

  2. DaveMart says:

    ‘While we don’t know the actual cost of the ERV’

    Under the second picture it says that the order is worth $13.4 million for 20 trucks.

    So it is $670,000 each.

    I’d guess though that the claim that:

    ‘Basically, it work out so that by the time the tenth order is placed, the cost is actually less than a comparable diesel refuse truck. And, of course, the cost of fueling this truck is significantly less than a diesel one.’

    May be based on lifetime costs, not purchase cost.

  3. Bill Howland says:

    Humm, good news, but like Via motors, some of the numbers don’t add up. You’d think a 30 KW charger would charge up a 200 kwh battery in 8 hours. 60 kw for 8 hours would be 480 kwh into the charger. That’s so low a battery charging efficiency that it just can’t be true. So, the thing has as much ‘grid impact’ as 1 1/2 of your typical Model “S”‘s.

    1. DaveMart says:

      It looks to me as though the specs of the on-board charger are for 60kw.

      I assume that the charging rate they normally use with the: ‘Motive Universal Fast Charger’ is lower, presumably around 25kw for the off-board element.

      Since garbage trucks are going to be off the road for more than 8 hours a day, there is no point charging any faster.

      Maybe they have 60kw on board for their potential bus applications.

      1. Jesse Gurr says:

        Does it have anything to do with it being a 3 phase charger? I know going from 3 phase to single phase means dividing power by 3. So it would actually be around 20kW. Which would be 160kWh after 8 hours and that would make sense if they use only 80% of the battery. Which makes sense if they don’t use the full capacity to have the battery last longer.

        1. DaveMart says:

          That sounds like an excellent point!

  4. Curtis Ling says:

    looks like something from the 80s

    1. DaveMart says:

      I had not realised that garbage trucks were a fashion statement! 😉

    2. ClarksonCote says:

      I was thinking the same thing!

      1. DaveMart says:

        Does my bum look big in this refuse sack? 🙂

    3. Jesse Gurr says:

      Its because the city is still using them. From the press release it says that Chicago still uses them. It must be too expensive to get the new trucks and new garbage cans for the robotic arms. Although in that picture of the guys loading the truck, one of them has the new can.

    4. Brian says:

      The garbage truck I passed in Syracuse, NY this morning is this same style.

  5. Stimpacker says:

    It may be ugly, it may be expensive, it may be a power hog, but it’s certainly a step in the right direction.

    Vehicles that make lots of frequent start-stop, short hops like busses, dump trucks, delivery trucks, etc are perfect candidates to be electrified. ICE vehicles are not good for this sort of duties. Notice how typical ICE service guidelines consider these sort of usage as “Severe” and mandate more frequent service.

    1. DaveMart says:

      Compaction is going to use a lot of power.

      1. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

        People keep trying to tell CARB and Toyota that, but they won’t listen.

      2. FSJ says:

        Reference?

    2. FSJ says:

      +1 That is what I was going to say. Whenever I am talking about the electrification movement, detractors always opine that it’s not going to work too well for trucks and planes, etc. I agree that there may be a delay for long haul trucking, but for short range stop-start stuff like this, it’s perfect. Add street sweepers, city dump trucks, busses, school busses,etc. I think it’s very exciting.

    3. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

      I’d be interested in knowing whether all-electric garbage trucks would be substantially quieter than diesels or NG.

  6. Jesse Gurr says:

    I didn’t know they designed garbage trucks like this anymore. The ones that I see now have the opening on top with the robotic arm to grab the can and dump it in the top. Are there enough municipalities still using this design to justify selling them this way?

  7. Storky says:

    Typically Chicago refuse trucks perform double-duty as snow plows. Are these likewise equipped?