Tesla P100D Ludicrous + Mode Presented By DragTimes – Video + 0 To 60 Run In 2.4 Seconds

2 months ago by Eric Loveday 40

Ludicrous + Warning Message

Ludicrous + Warning Message

The promised Ludicrous + mode has arrived! With it comes 0 to 60 MPH in 2.465 seconds for the Tesla Model S P100DL and a somewhat comical warning message that reads:

“Are you sure you want to push the limits? This will cause accelerated wear of the motor, gearbox and battery.”

This accelerated wear is likely similar to using Launch Mode too often, which Tesla limits if need be.

You’re selections options are:

No, I want my Mommy

Or

Yes, bring it on!

Activation of Ludicrous + is accomplished by holding the Ludicrous button for 5 seconds on the settings screen.

DragTimes released video of Ludicrous + with this description:

“Tesla has released an update that includes a hidden easter egg to enable Ludicrous + offering higher performance for their P100D Model S and Model X vehicles.”

“In this video we show you show to enable Ludicrous Plus as well as go over the additional diagnostic screens that are included as well as test out the 0-60 MPH Time.”

The additional diagnostic screen is shown below:

Ludicrous + Diagnostic Readout

Ludicrous + Diagnostic Readout

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40 responses to "Tesla P100D Ludicrous + Mode Presented By DragTimes – Video + 0 To 60 Run In 2.4 Seconds"

  1. Scott B. says:

    Wow…very interesting. I wonder how Tesla will respond to drive unit replacements for units trashed after repeated L+ launches.

    1. floydboy says:

      Likely a modification of warranty. There are people out there who may say red pill(ala The Matrix) now, but the second something starts to happen from the wear and tear, they’ll go into betrayal mode, say they should have taken the blue pill and whine about how terrible Tesla is!

      Maybe one day, after a few choice lawsuits, Elon will learn not to be so trusting!

      1. Nix says:

        Anybody who is worried about that can freely of their own free will choose the “No, I want my Mommy” button.

        Everybody else will have their “Yes, bring it on!” response well documented.

        Any arbitration would go like this:

        Arbitrator: Mr Lead Foot, when asked repeatedly “Are you sure you want to push the limits? This will cause accelerated wear of the motor, gearbox and battery.”, did you repeatedly respond “Yes, bring it on!”

        Mr Foot: Yes, I repeatedly clicked the “Yes, bring it on!” response.

        Arbitrator: You didn’t select “No, I want my Mommy” but NOW you want your mommy?

        Mr. Foot: Yes now I want my mommy….

        *laugh*

    2. pjwood1 says:

      Easy. By permanently taking the power down after ~25 launches, so your ownership experience is “enhanced” by not having to go in for service.

      Tesla: “To help protect the performance and longevity of the powertrain, Performance versions of the Model S and Model X continually monitor the condition of various components and may employ limiting controls to optimize the overall driving and ownership experience.”

      The above is the statement that folks on TMC are speculating legally relieves Tesla of having to support the performance they advertise. So far, its only a 513KW to 480KW cut, but like many other P-buyers, it puts me a little further out the door. Games.

      1. floydboy says:

        Or they could simply do like other manufacturers, and simply deliver the initial performance and “support” nothing but the reasonable wear and tear of normal driving!

        1. pjwood1 says:

          floydboy, I don’t know how much performance driving you’ve done and what support, or lack of support you’ve experienced. What concerns me about Tesla is people are claiming multiple demonstrations of launches caused the power cut, not hobby racing.

          I’ve mostly just put thousands of miles on Porsches, by hobby or educational track racing, and never had a warranty issue or instance where I’ve been rejected. That said, I’ve certainly never brought a car in for service and been delivered back something less, just in case wear might happen. This is the slippery slope Tesla now walks.

          What they did isn’t bad in numbers terms. P85D hardly breaks a massive 450KW. And, to be fair, it is only demonstrated on the later P90D’s, not early, the P85D or P100D.

          1. Nix says:

            pj — Porsche specifically does NOT cover track use. Even for the GT3.

            “This Warranty Does Not Cover:

            Abuse, accident, acts of God, competition, racing, track use, or other events.
            Note 1: Components and/or parts that fail during racing or driving events (including Porsche sponsored events) may not be covered by the new car Limited Warranty.
            Note 2: You should also be aware that PCNA may deny you warranty coverage if your vehicle or a part has failed due to abuse, neglect, improper maintenance or unapproved modifications.”

            http://www.porsche.com/usa/accessoriesandservices/porscheservice/vehicleinformation/warranty/

            Porsche’s warranty doc specifically excludes track use coverage a half a dozen times in their warranty.

            1. pjwood1 says:

              Yes, I owned a 997.1. That denial, as with most other “weekend raced” cars, is practically unheard of. A full out PCA race car, all decked out with gumball marks, etc, etc, is what they won’t cover. And we’re skipping the fact Porsche doesn’t detune, or make disclaimers about detuning, their customers cars.

              Why can’t we see this for what it is, and stop sugar coating manufacturers misdeeds? If BMW did it, in one/two instances, it doesn’t create a pathway for “As with other vehicles”. That just sets up how quickly Tesla can race to the bottom. I think it is ethical to publish numbers and deliver a car that you’ll stand behind, in meeting them, throughout the warranty period.

              1. floydboy says:

                Now you’re simply being unreasonable! Warranties exist for a reason! There are real costs associated with them! You CANNOT expect a company to support your ‘I can do anything I want to my car, but I want someone else to pay for it’ attitude. If you want to abuse the components of the car, you should have every right, as it is your car! By the same token, the manufacturer ABSOLUTELY should be under NO obligation to support your abuse, outside of normal parameters!

                You may consider it a “race to the bottom”, but I consider it common sense!

      2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        “The above is the statement that folks on TMC are speculating legally relieves Tesla of having to support the performance they advertise. So far, its only a 513KW to 480KW cut, but like many other P-buyers, it puts me a little further out the door. Games.”

        Sadly, I find that to be the most likely scenario here. It was recently revealed that Tesla cars, or at least the more high-performance ones, are programmed to reduce “launch mode” power if used very many times.

        So why would Tesla encourage drivers to stress the powertrain even more by enabling a “Ludicrous plus” launch mode?

        Yeah, it makes sense if Tesla is actually doing this to limit its liability over permanently reducing maximum power in the car.

        Even as a Tesla fan, I find this entire situation to be dishonest and unethical. Tesla should limit the “launch mode” power to whatever the car can repeatedly withstand over the lifetime of the car.

        Yes, I realize that high-performance gasmobiles are built so they can be “redlined” to allow the driver to push the limits of the engine, sometimes dangerously. But Tesla cars — other than the Roadster — are not high-performance sports cars. They’re family sedans and “soccer mom” CUVs.

  2. Mark V says:

    Love the readout screen!

    1. Josh Bryant says:

      Agreed, the readout screen is better innovation than the performance boost.

  3. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ sven says:

    When shopping for a used Tesla is there a way to see on the car’s screen exactly how many times regular Launch Control was used and how many times Ludicrous Plus Launch Control was used?

  4. acevolt says:

    This is still not as fast as the Faraday FF-91. Very disappointing 🙂

    1. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ sven says:

      Maybe Tesla could poach some of Faraday Future’s engineers like they do with Apple. 😉

    2. Daniel says:

      Well, if the FF-91 were available for purchase and were in the wild (read in consumers hands) then perhaps so but to say that the P100DL has disappointing performance when compared to a vehicle “that may never make it to production” seems, well.. ludicrous! lol!!

      1. floydboy says:

        Good point!

    3. Nix says:

      I’m sure if you strip out the interior of the Tesla, the way FF stripped out the interior of there car for their staged race, it would be faster too.

    4. Paul Smith says:

      The Faraday FF-91 is a concept car.

    5. bogdan says:

      U are talking about unlaid eggs.
      Tesla is here and can catapult up to 11.2 m/s^2.
      That’s more then gravitational acceleration.

  5. DJ says:

    FYI – 2.465 is not 2.4 seconds. It’s actually 2.5 seconds. Well that is unless you aren’t doing Argentine rounding in which case let’s just change the title to read “Tesla P100D Ludicrous + Mode Presented By DragTimes – Video + 0 To 60 Run In 2 Seconds”.

    I guess this is cool, assuming you want to purposely break your car.

    1. Nix says:

      DJ — Car culture terminology doesn’t always follow your preconceived ideas.

      For example, the term “5-second car” does not mean 0-60 in 5.4999 seconds or less. It means 0-60 in 5-5.99 seconds.

      This is a well-used term that goes back decades, and based on that common car enthusiast term, this car would indeed legitimately be called a “2-Second Car”. Calling it a “2.4 Second Car” is equally valid under this car culture tradition.

      Here is what zeroto60times says about it:

      “5 Second Cars
      Find Cars with Five Second 0 to 60 Times

      Find cars that accelerate to 60 miles per hour between 5-5.99 seconds. These fast cars referred to as “5 second cars” were once reserved for only top end supercars, although with the advancements in automotive engineering, 5 second 0-60 times have become more common and open to everyday performance-oriented cars. Outside of factory stock five second cars, many race cars and modified street legal cars today easily reach this 5 second club. Browse by make below to start finding five second cars’ 0-60 mph and quarter mile stats. Make sure to check back soon for updates to this 5 second 0 to 60 specs category as these stats are regularly changing.”

      http://www.zeroto60times.com/5-second-cars-0-60-mph-times/

      1. DJ says:

        So then the FF91 does 0-60 in 2.3 seconds. Whoaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

        1. DJ says:

          Case in point.

          Why isn’t this article titled “Faraday Future Debuts The FF 91: 378 Miles Range, 0-60 MPH In 2.3 Seconds” instead of “Faraday Future Debuts The FF 91: 378 Miles Range, 0-60 MPH In 2.39 Seconds”

          http://insideevs.com/faraday-future-debuts-ff91/

          Oh wait, that’s right. Because it’s not Tesla 😉

        2. Nick says:

          Haha!

          And the Nick Motors BS-01 does 0-60 in 0.55 seconds! And has 800 mile range! Also, it only costs 65k!

          to reserve now.

          See how easy it is to “make” a Tesla killer?

  6. Derek says:

    That looks like a reference to the video game wolfenstien on pc.

    1. Aaron says:

      Duke Nukem — skill level choice

      1. DJ says:

        This is what I was thinking actually. More appropriate knowing given what you’re gonna do to the car.

        1. Mister G says:

          DJ let me know when you can test drive a FF91? I WON’T BE HOLDING MY BREATH LOL

  7. Mister G says:

    SWEET BABY JESUS…GO TESLA GO

  8. Jake Brake says:

    What they don’t like to mention is that Tesla’s unlimited powertrain warranty doesn’t cover battery degradation, so basically you are own your own for a replacement if needed.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      That’s nothing but FUD. Tesla certainly does replace the battery pack under warranty, when needed. They just don’t specify exactly what conditions of power and/or capacity loss constitute a need for replacement.

      1. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ sven says:

        So in other words, Tesla does not warranty capacity loss for their batteries. Got it.

      2. Jake Brake says:

        It pretty clearly states that capacity and power loss are the car owners problem, not tesla. Aka not under warranty unless tesla wants your pack for r&d.

      3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        No matter how many times y’all repeat a Big Lie, it’s still a lie.

        You can’t point to even one case where a Model S or X battery pack has needed to be replaced due to normal aging, because Tesla battery packs last even longer than they were expected to. In the rare case of abnormal capacity loss, Tesla replaces the pack under warranty. For the S85, that’s an unlimited warranty, for the lifetime of the car; for the S60, that’s a 125,000 mile warranty.

        But of course, actual facts never stop you serial Tesla bashers from posting FUD, do they?

        See, for example: “Tesla battery packs last longer than you’d think — a whole lot longer”

        http://www.digitaltrends.com/cars/tesla-battery-pack-degradation/#ixzz4VXr1I2Yn

        http://www.teslarati.com/tesla-model-s-battery-warranty/

  9. Durkle says:

    So do they track when you activate this mode, or just when you do launches? Because I’d love to just drive around with those stats on the dashboard all the time… neat things to be able to see! No need to do hard accelerations all the time, but I wonder if they would discourage entering this mode even if you just drive normally with it.

  10. Viktor says:

    I love that Elon continue with movie references 🙂

  11. Apkungen says:

    Why is it not saying “no, I want my Daddy”? A bit fascist i think!

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