Tesla Model X P90DL On The Strip Or To The Soccer Practice – 0 To 60 MPH In 3.1 Seconds

1 year ago by Jay Cole 27

Just Imagine, 1,000s Of These Will Be Driving To And From Soccer Practises All Over The US This Year

Just Imagine, 1,000s Of These Will Be Driving To And From Soccer Practices All Over The US This Year

Clearly this will not be the last time we see Tesla’s new all-electric SUV (Model X) hit the drag strip, we expect it to soon be pitted against all comers.

But here it is heading out by itself, hitting 60 mph from a standstill in 3.1 seconds.

Watching an SUV with this kind of performance is truly something to behold!

Hat tip to offib!

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27 responses to "Tesla Model X P90DL On The Strip Or To The Soccer Practice – 0 To 60 MPH In 3.1 Seconds"

  1. After performing that little parlor trick, how long do you have to wait for it to cool down before you can do it again? According to Car & Driver’s test of the Model S version, it’s at least three minutes and requires a 95% charge. On the other hand the Cayenne Turbo S takes 3.8 seconds but you repeat it as quickly as you like and all day long, it gets FASTER as there’s less gas in the tank and it blows away the Tesla over 40mph or so.

    (I just want to keep things in perspective before you Teslarians get too excited.)

    1. SageSagan says:

      Whereas the Cayenne’s little parlour trick is to help contribute to 4000 vehicle pollution deaths a year. Secondly are we actually discussing the drag racing potential of a school run vehicle? Vehicles like the X will help improve the air quality in major cities, there are no power station in London so regardless of how E.V.s are charged they will be a major improvement over I.C.E.

      1. SageSagan says:

        Sorry quick edit: I meant to say 4000 deaths in London alone. If one were to add up all the major cities pollution death rates the number would be horrifying.

      2. Tesla (and this web site) is certainly marketing its drag-racing capabilities; I’m just putting them in perspective.

        As for your pollution point, it depends (of course) how its charged. In China for instance an electric car probably contributes more pollution than a modern emission-controlled gasoline vehicle (which, by the way– unlike diesels– are pretty damn clean these days).

        1. SageSagan says:

          Most major metropolitan areas around the world,even in China are noticeably lacking in large coal fired power stations. If every car in London or Beijing were replaced with E.V.s then the air quality would improve hugely even with the current generation mix. As a Londoner this is a big issue for me…sorry to come across rantey but the inexplicable popularity of huge,inefficient SUV’s in London drives me nuts.

          1. sven says:

            SageSagan said:
            “If every car in London or Beijing were replaced with E.V.s then the air quality would improve hugely even with the current generation mix.”

            If all cars in Beijing were EVS, then the air quality in Beijing would get worse until the coal-powered electric plants were replaced with cleaner electric sources. I think you are seriously underestimating how just how dirty the emissions from China’s coal-powered plants really are. They have none of pollution-controls and emissions scrubbers found in European and American coal-powered plants. Likewise I think you are seriously underestimating just how much of Beijing’s electricity currently comes from coal power, and seriously underestimating the distance that a coal plant has to be from a city so as not to negatively affect its air quality. Currently, 90% of Beijing’s electricity is generated by coal power. In the United States the air quality on the eastern seaboard was negatively affected by smog caused by upwind coal-powered electric plants in the midwest (Ohio Valley), 600 miles away.

            For many years states on the east cost complained that coal-fired electric plants in the midwest sent were harming the air quality by creating smog in the downwind east coast states. The east coast states sued the EPA and midwest coal plants and won. The court forced EPA to get the midwest coal plants to clean up their emissions, which reduced smog and air pollution in the downwind states in

            “Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei are all more than 90 percent reliant on coal for energy”

            “A series of studies by Tsinghua University . . . showed electric vehicles charged in China produce two to five times as much particulate matter and chemicals that contribute to smog versus petrol-engine cars.”

            “Tsinghua’s studies call into question the wisdom of aggressively promoting vehicles which the university said could not be considered environmentally friendly for at least a decade in many areas of China unless grid reform accelerates.”

            http://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-pollution-autos-idUSKCN0V51BH

            1. Tech01x says:

              We have no choice, we have to clean up the coal power plants and reduce the amount of coal burned, regardless of the amount of electric cars. So China is heavily invested in altering that equation, so looking at the current status is not indicative.

              Further, China is installing scrubbers and other tech and shutting down the worst coal plants.

              In the U.S., the use of coal is dropping dramatically and will continue to drop.

              It is still worse to be right next to gasoline and diesel powered cars – from your linked article, “It’s much easier for society to make hundreds of power plants better than change the hundreds of millions of cars in thousands of cities.” We can also cut down on carbon monoxide related injuries and deaths.

        2. manbitesgas says:

          That statement on China will soon be invalid given their ludicrous pace of solar deployment. We can in fact learn a few things from China…

        3. s says:

          “Probably”?

          While the “what I want to be true is probably true” market research methodology is “probably” fine for the distinguished economists at Stanphyl Capital Management, a simple google search can answer the China emissions question for you.

          Go to http://www.ucsusa.org/clean-vehicles/electric-vehicles/ev-emissions-tool and plug in a zip code from the dirtiest US state grid. Say, 24823, Coal Mountain, WV.

          The answer?

          “A 2016 Tesla Model X AWD – P90D charged in 24823 produces about as much global warming pollution as a gasoline vehicle getting 38 miles per gallon.”

          West Virginia is 95% coal by the way. China is 75%.

          It’s a good thing you are not investing other people’s money based on this research… Oh wait.

          1. Mark B Spiegel says:

            “A 2016 Tesla Model X AWD – P90D charged in 24823 produces about as much global warming pollution…”

            I’m actually talking about REAL pollution, not “political fantasy pollution.” (Check the satellite & un-revised historical ground station temperature data, then get back to me, okay?

            1. s says:

              Surely ground station temperature data is the best source to isolate pollution caused by a specific type of power plants and compare it to pollution caused by gas-burning SUVs.

              And on the other hand, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Union of Concerned Scientists are just making stuff up in order to pump TSLA stock.

        4. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

          Mark B. Spiegel continued his anti-EV campaign:

          “…a modern emission-controlled gasoline vehicle (which, by the way– unlike diesels– are pretty damn clean these days).”

          Clean? Try wrapping your lips around the tailpipe of even the “cleanest” gasmobile when it’s running, and breathe for five minutes. Then come back here and tell us how “clean” it is. Go ahead, we’ll wait…

          1. Mark B Spiegel says:

            “Try wrapping your lips around the tailpipe of even the “cleanest” gasmobile when it’s running, and breathe for five minutes.”

            Sure, but first you do it around the smokestack of a power plant, okay?

            1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

              I’m having a hard time finding a smokestack here:

              I understand my friends in Washington State, Oregon, and Canada depend mostly on this for their electricity. For the rest of us, it’s still part of the mix.

              And I don’t see a smokestack at this power plant located about 90 miles from where I live, either:

              (That’s the Wolf Creek Nuclear Plant, near Burlington, Kansas)

              So sorry about your carcinogen-laced-soot spewing gasmobile, Mark.

              1. sven says:

                Coal-powered plants account for 58% of electricity generation in Kansas, while natural-gas-powered plants account for 3%. I don’t think you’ll have a hard time finding a smokestack in Kansas. Just saying’.

                To find out how Kansas’ electricity generation stacks up (pun intended) against other states, check out the excellent interactive graph on this web page (second from the top):

                https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/national/power-plants/

            2. Kacey Green says:

              @LT don’t forget that power plants get cleaner with age due to emission controls and new regs and proper maintenance, While personal vehicles are cleanest right around when they are new and decline from there especially if for over ~10 years lifetime.

        5. ffbj says:

          It’s just a natural consequence of what some people like to do with cars.
          The fact that an SUV can smoke all but the highest performing super-cars is just a natural consequence of the superiority of its power plant and design.

      3. alex says:

        Cayenne may do it again and again and again, but only in places where nobody can see. In real life they’re bound to be stuck in traffic.

        Whereas Tesla will perform where everybody can see, like HOV lanes, traffic lights etc.

        Also, as a pedestrian I have to inhale emissions from the cars that I can see passing by, not emissions from plants hundred miles away and believe me it feels tempting to make owners of gas cars share the burden of ever growing health care costs.

        As for the electricity from coal fired plants, most of them, at least in the US were to be closed decades ago. Lots of them are finally being closed. And I don’t think there are many new coal fired plants being built.

        Tesla can be easily switched from coal to solar, next year or a year from now. As for Cayenne I am not so sure. We’re stuck for at least a decade. Unless some new regulation kicks in off course. And you know what? Something is telling me that new regulation could easily raise cost of ownership for gasoline cars. Especially expensive ones.

    2. Tech01x says:

      By the time most people would be ready again, the Model X would be ready.

      3.8 is a far cry from 3.1. It’s a different universe with vehicles. Plus, the X is doing it with 7 seats. The 5 seat version would be even faster.

      GHG emissions is already lower than 100% coal versus a Cayenne. With the cleanest coal plants, the NOx and SOx are also lower. In places where Tesla’s are most popular, the emissions profile of a Model X is about 3 times lower than a Cayenne, and that isn’t counting the seat difference.

    3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      Mark B. Spiegel, who gets paid for his Tesla bashing blog posts on Seeking Alpha, weakly grasped for some new FUD:

      “After performing that little parlor trick, how long do you have to wait for it to cool down before you can do it again? According to Car & Driver’s test of the Model S version, it’s at least three minutes…”

      Gosh, I’ll try to bear up under the terrible weight of disappointment that the Model X probably can only do a drag race start every three minutes or so. I’m sure that in real life, drivers will often want to start a new drag race more often than that. [/snark]

      1. Kacey Green says:

        how long does it take to come back to the front of the line and line up again, even with dedicated track time? More than 3 min surely with other racers.

        Also I haven’t seen in any of the videos where new owners are doing launch after launch and don’t see any messages about reduced performance.

    4. EVfans says:

      40mph??

      so model x 1/4 mile is 11.6s

      what is Cayenne’s? lol

    5. Jonathan B says:

      I don’t think many people will be doing repeated attempts at 0-60 runs within 3 minutes in any car. However, I think that if you were to be a constant 0-60 person, the damage to running a Porsche engine to that capacity repeatedly would be much more harmful on the car than running a Tesla repeated to 0-60. I just can’t imaging that sort of abuse and redlining of an ICE car is good for it. There’s a reason why race cars go through 2 engines in any given season. Meanwhile in the Tesla… you just wear out the tires faster.

    6. Thomas J. Thias says:

      Sorry,

      Harsh Opinion/

      Meh, With Spiegel Friegel’s #antiEVZombie & #antiRenewableEnergyZombie’ Krap’ polluting this thread, hows bout watching the Tesla Motors Model X tow a 4,800lb boat to the marina!

      Link Goes To Tesla Model X Owner, Max Kennedy towing 4,800lb boat! – Video, YouTube-

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3QbKexTSok

      Still, under the mantle of, one for all and all for one, in the surging Global #ElectricFueledVehicle Industry, try this:

      Can…..

      Mitsubishi Outander PHEV, Volvo XC90T8 PHEV, BMW X5 eDrve PHEV, Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class Plug-in PHEV, BYD Tang PHEV, Porsch Cayenne S.E, Hybrid PHEV…

      …..Tow that boat?

      No!

      Ps.

      Yes, Via Motors E-REV, 12 Passenger Van, Can! LOL

      Best-

      Thomas J. Thias

      517-749-0532

      Publisher:

      https://twitter.com/AmazingChevVolt

  2. SparkEV says:

    I stopped doing sprints as often. Tires wear out way too quickly! 🙁 Tire tech should catch up to EV tech.

  3. fan_favorite says:

    It’s so surreal to see something that big move so fast.