Tesla Model S Parallel Parks Itself In Extremely Tight Spot – Video

2 years ago by Electric CarsTV 20

Turns out the Tesla Model S can auto parallel park is some rather tight spots.

Video description:

Short clip from a longer sequence we have coming outlining the full version 7.0 update on the Tesla Model S.

Autopark feature into an extremely small spot, spot is 2.5 feet longer than the Model S.

To us, the spot looks a touch bigger than the YouTube uploader suggests, but the Model S does a rather impressive job of parking, nonetheless.  (Watch out for some slight NSFW language)

Tesla Model S Autopark

Tesla Model S Autopark

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20 responses to "Tesla Model S Parallel Parks Itself In Extremely Tight Spot – Video"

  1. Steven says:

    Whoa, pretty good!
    Space wise this is what you have to deal with in most European cities though 🙂 This makes it less nerve wrecking at the end of a long day when eyes become fuzzy from lack of sleep.

    1. Djoni says:

      No, European drivers just bump other car until it make a place for themselves.
      I was there, and I saw it and all the scar on bumper and fender show exactly that.
      It’s their way of optimizing space

      1. Are you European? I assure you if you come to the UK such a practice is not normal behaviour.

        1. Braben says:

          In some cities like Paris and Rome it is indeed like Djoni wrote. In Germany, on the other hand, you’d be killed by the owners of the other cars if they caught you. 😉

  2. Rick Danger says:

    Wow! Nice job.

  3. wavelet says:

    Sorry… Maybe this is good going for the auto-parking feature, but 2.5 ft clearance is by no means tight for curbside urban parking.

    I virtually always <2 ft clearance (in back & front together) when parking, and <=1 ft is pretty common.

    1. Roy_H says:

      BS on the 1ft. Unless you are parking a motorcycle? What do you drive?

      1. mr. M says:

        I often do around 50cm front+back combined. Once i managed 20cm combined.

        Yes, this is so thight that you barelly can walk trough. 😉

      2. wavelet says:

        I’m not in the car-friendly US; this is in Israel. Car is a Škoda Roomster MPV, 4.20m (165 inches) long.

        And I’m not even particularly good at parking, just average, since I ride a motorcycle most of the time. The people who are good at it can (and do) park so there’s no room for a person to pass between their car and both the cars in front and in back, that is, bumbers are nearly touching on both sides (so, <3 inches both sides).

        Sure, it's a hassle parking this close (I sometimes need 1-2 dozen back/forth movements), but there's frequently no choice, it's either park like that or give up on parking, period, since there are no other spaces, not at any price.

        You folks are simply spoiled.

        (and I also ride motorcycles… Over here, most riders would never park one curbside in the city. You usually park them on sidewalks, or, if there's no room there, adjacent to the curb, at 90deg to it so it's not taking up an entire car space. If you take up a car's space (although that's the only legal method unless there are motorcycle-specific sports marked), you're likely to find your motorbike moved or sometimes even dropped on its side by irate car drivers.

    2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      wavelet

      “I virtually always <2 ft clearance (in back & front together) when parking, and <=1 ft is pretty common."

      Or maybe you're just not very good at estimating distances by eye. Next time, take a ruler with you and give yourself a reality check.

      With less than 1 ft. clearance both fore and aft, you'd have a very hard time even working your way out of a parallel parking space… let alone into it.

      1. wavelet says:

        I’m perfectly fine at estimating distances (-:
        You’re simply very much US-centric, and/or are unfamiliar with dense urban areas.

        See my response to Roy_H above — like I said, frequently, there’s no room for a person to pass sideways between the cars’ bumpers, that is, the distance on each side is less than the thickness of a human foot at the shin (3-4″).

        Parking being such a hassle is one of the major reasons why so many people here ride scooters in the urban areas (pizza deliveries with cars are unknown here), unfortunately not electric ones.

        1. Wayne says:

          Sorry but the physics do not add up. 3-4″ either side dies not allow sufficient room for an oblong shape of the size of a model s to physically move into the space unless the wheels allow perpendicular movement. This is clearly an exaggeration.

          1. wavelet says:

            Wayne,
            I wasn’t referring to the Model S. It’s much longer & wider and has a wider turning circle than most cars here.

  4. ffbj says:

    Good job. Not that many moves to get in and the nice equalizing at the last is the finishing touch.

    1. ffbj says:

      Also Tesla is checking the seat belt mounts at sc stations.

  5. Three Electrics says:

    The Tesla does an admirable job here. That said, it looks identical to what an i3 would do. The real difference is that the i3 can fit in many more spots, because it is a true city car, not a behemoth size required to support a monstrous battery.

  6. Anthony says:

    Will the Tesla pull you out of that spot too??

    1. chickeee says:

      that will be later update of version 7

  7. Lars says:

    Nice job. But for me living in Denmark this amount of parking space is only available on a lucky day. What is the minimum space accepted by the Tesla Parking Pilot? And, by the way, we don’t bump into each other in Denmark as well?