Tesla Eliminates Software Performance Reductions Due To Max Power Usage

4 months ago by Eric Loveday 18

No Power Restrictions Anymore

Following some kickback from Tesla owners, the automaker has decided to eliminate the “Software performance reductions due to frequent max power” that had previously been in place for the Model S and Model X.

Previously, some cars “not the P100D” had some performance limits when launched frequently

Tesla says that rather than limiting power, it will monitor the condition of the vehicle’s powertrain and push out an alert if service is required. Here’s the statement from Tesla on the matter:

“Software performance reductions due to frequent max power usage have been removed. These reductions had been in place to proactively protect the powertrain from wear and tear. Instead, we will monitor the condition of the powertrain and display an alert if service is needed so we can take proactive steps, such as by replacing parts if necessary, to maintain the vehicle’s performance.”

Initially, the restrictions were discovered via a Tesla Motors Club Forum discussion in which a Tesla representative responded to an inquiry like this (see orginal TMC thread here):

“Thank you for your time. To recap our conversation, using launch mode places an increased stress on the entire powertrain accelerating aging and fatigue of various components. The computer systems automatically track launch mode usage and continually estimate fatigue damage. Depending on how launch mode is used, the computer may eventually limit the available power during launch mode to protect the powertrain. Note that this is a common strategy also employed in other high performance cars. As discussed, upgrading to the P100D ludicrous will remove this limit and will not be limited in the future as the P100D does not have this limit for launch mode.”

After some initial outcry from Tesla owners, Jon McNeill, Tesla’s head of global sales and service, reached out to the Tesla owners community by stating:

It’s go time again. And again. And again.

“Based on your input, we have decided to remove all software performance reductions tied to frequent max power usage. These changes will roll out with our next software update (in about three weeks).

We had put these reductions in place to proactively protect the powertrain from wear and tear. Instead, we will monitor the condition of the powertrain and let our customers know if service is needed so that we can take proactive steps, such as by replacing parts if necessary, to maintain the vehicle’s performance.”

It took approximately 2 months, not 3 weeks, to roll out the change, but it’s here now in the latest software update. So, software performance reductions are now a thing of the past in Teslas.

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18 responses to "Tesla Eliminates Software Performance Reductions Due To Max Power Usage"

  1. Get Real says:

    You forgot to show the disclaimer screen where it says:

    No, I want my Mommy or Yes, Bring it On!!!

    1. Ijmijon says:

      Tesla Doesn’t mind if you run the **** out of your car ., when it’s all said & done you’re going to pay to repair it.

  2. GeorgeS says:

    “We will monitor the condition of the powertrain and let our customers know if service is needed”

    Hmmm
    I wonder how they will do that. Perhaps just by looking at the number of cycles as before and then just calling you in for an inspection for a fee.

    Just guessing but i would think the reduction gear set would be the most susceptible to wear.

    I can’t imagine that they could monitor gear wear without physically measuring backlash….but who knows they are a smart bunch.

    1. Hari says:

      Been wondering the same. They either have a overtly over engineered system with impossible number of sensors or they are just winging it.

      If it wasn’t Tesla, I would’ve called it out instantly.

  3. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

    Why do those instructions look like a cheat code to a game?

    1. MG says:

      To avoid enabling maximum power (and damage) all the time, and probably as a CYA statement

  4. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    Note: Launch Mode is not available if Slip Start has been enabled (i.e. wheels can spin).

    OMG! Can you now smoke the wheels in a Tesla car? This is the first time I’ve ever seen anything about that!

    Here I was giving Tesla points for not enabling that brain-dead activity.

    *Sigh*

    1. Ijmijon says:

      Burn Rubber not Gas…(still an oil Byproduct)

  5. Daniel says:

    That’s why a CPO is a tad bit spooky, “to me at least”. As the drive line most likely will have been subjected to repeatedly being hammered.

    1. georgeS says:

      Daniel,
      Not if you buy a plain 85. It does 0-60 in 5.5 seconds. That’s fast enough and it saves you money when you buy and gets you are a car with less wear and tear on it.

      IMO a CPO Tesla is a great way to start enjoying your car before service centers and super chargers make availability worse.

      Last time I called the service center it was 1 week o 2 to book a srvice center apt.

      I’m really glad I can enjoy the network now.

      if you don’t live in Ca things aren’t so bad.

      1. Daniel says:

        Agreed. I’ve done the homework and actually I’m shopping for an 85 no way I would want any performance version and even the 85 is questionable because the acceleration is still far beyond what most are used to experiencing in a gas burner and likely will have been tested several times. As far as superchargers where I live they are non-existent the closest supercharger to my house is at max range for an S85 just to get there under ideal conditions.

  6. Stimpacker says:

    No surprise. Jon is good at making money. Thanks to the hot rod cry babies, now you may have to fork out for additional service.

  7. DL says:

    I would really like to know who all these “hot rod” Tesla owners are. All the ones I see are driven like grandmas.

    1. Nick says:

      You’re lucky. Around here there’s way to much traffic to see any performance car driven in any other way.

  8. Dan says:

    Not sure how I feel about this – If I were to buy a used a Tesla I would kinda like to know if the car has been excessively launched because the previous owner wanted to “show off” to his friends.

    1. Jason says:

      No different to buying an ICE. Did the previous owner look after it, were they driving aggressively and placing more strain on the vehicle? You do the best you can to determine the state of the vehicle when you buy it. Maybe Tesla has a way to report how the vehicle has been driven, number of high power launches back to back, etc. With all 2nd hand good you have to take your chances.

  9. Some Guy says:

    Tesla should simply void the warranties on vehicles whose owners hack the software to get more power or who habitually drag race their cars.

  10. Lps says:

    And Ontario just re-instated $14000 rebate to Tesla purchasers. That tax money (my tax!)would have been much better spent on helping “middle class” folks buy any more reasonably priced EVs.

    Tesla must be chuckling thinking of $$$$$ service calls.

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