Tesla To Discontinue Model S 60 & 60D On April 17

5 months ago by Steven Loveday 29

Tesla Model S 60

The Model X 60D’s fate was sealed before it ever arrived.

To make way for the upcoming Model 3, and to “simplify the order process” for their customers, Tesla is eliminating its Model S 60 and 60D sedans. However, if you still want one, the automaker is giving you a month to place your order.

Tesla released its least expensive – 60 line – a year ago. The vehicles were set to utilize a 75 kWh battery, which is software limited to ~60 kWh. For a mere ~$6,500, buyers could choose to unlock the battery’s full potential at the point of purchase. After the fact, it would cost ~$10,000.

This effort by Tesla came along to assure that the company had an “affordable” model available, due to the huge interest in the Model 3, and the fact that the upcoming offering wouldn’t arrive for quite some time.

We have been aware for awhile now that this decision was imminent. Tesla announced a software limited Model X 60D back in July, and secretly discontinued the offering before it was ever arrived. Tesla realized that very few people were taking advantage of these software limited vehicles, and instead were splurging for the 75 kWh equivalent.

Tesla’s official communication on the matter is as follows:

Tesla Model S

Tesla will officially discontinue the Model S 60 and 60D on April 17, 2017.

Source: Tesla

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30 responses to "Tesla To Discontinue Model S 60 & 60D On April 17"

  1. Victor says:

    I got an email from Tesla encouraging me to get the Tesla S60 ( while supplies last). It was very flattering, but the truth is I can’t afford that car. I am laser focus on the Tesla Model 3 and I will patiently wait my turn in line. Hopefully I can get it before 2020, my patience does have a limit.

  2. Viktor says:

    I believe that it a complete lie from Tesla here, I believe to few updated the car to 75 wish maid it a high cost for Tesla to ship 75 kWh of batteries to all the cars.

    1. bro1999 says:

      Yep, spot on. Tesla makes more money if people buy a 60, then upgrade compared to buying a 75.

      Not enough $$$ from upgrades, so can it.

      1. Zach says:

        Also their latest sales strategy is to give people hard limits on availability of features (they did the same with free supercharging) to get people to bite the bullet. Since they more or less refuse to use carrots (dealer mark downs, temporary finance offers) they are left with sticks.

        1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

          We have to wonder just what sort of person complains about an auto maker not forcing its customers to buy cars through a dealership, which is almost universally reported as a hassle if not downright traumatic; as if not having to haggle with the dealer to reduce the inflated “sticker price” is a bad thing.

          Do you, perhaps, work for a legacy auto dealer or manufacturer?

          But hey, if you want to buy from a legacy auto dealer, accepting the fact that you’ll be dealing with a professional negotiator whose goal is to get you to pay as much as possible for the car, and certainly more than a fair market value, then by all means buy one from someone other than Tesla.

          There’s an easy way to make your purchase from a legacy auto dealer as hassle-free as buying one from Tesla: Just pay whatever the salesman suggests, without haggling! Be sure to agree quickly when he suggests worthless “upsells” such as the extended service contract, upholstery fabric protection, and rustproofing.

          Also, don’t worry about the fact that legacy auto dealers make most of their money from their service department, unlike Tesla which aims to make those profit-neutral. Legacy auto dealers have a strong motive to sell you service you don’t need, or to double-charge for it. But surely that’s worth it so you don’t have to pay the no-haggle price of a Tesla car, right?

          /sarcasm

  3. I fully support Tesla’s decision, which makes our S 60 very special. 🙂

  4. Shane says:

    The S 60 will not be competitive against the Model 3 with an equivalent or better range. The S 75 will probably also meet the same fate once the Model 3 is in production. Tesla is rightly distinguishing between the Model 3 and the Model S — if you want a bigger battery you will have to splurge for the Model S.

    1. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ sven says:

      Additional range should not be a luxury feature.

      1. floydboy says:

        It’s just a feature. Nothing luxurious about it.

        1. zzzzzzzzzz says:

          Price tag is luxurious.

      2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        So, you’re saying that it’s a bad thing that Tesla (and Nissan?) offer buyers the choice of a higher trim version of their cars with higher range.

        Unlike other EV makers, who don’t offer any option for higher range at all.

        Only serial Tesla bashers and FUDsters like Sven try to insinuate that more options for car buyers are a bad thing.

        1. DJ says:

          And yet Tesla is actually removing some of those options.. hmmm…

          The 60 was probably the best “deal” on a Tesla out there. Now those who get one get to pay a ridiculous amount more for a little bigger pack. ~$450 per extra kWh is pretty darn steep. That is unless they are going to make the 75 cheaper which I doubt.

          1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

            Certainly the new S60 was the “best deal”, figured in $/kWh, of anything Tesla has offered to date. As some of the more thoughtful industry watchers have noted, it appears that the “cut-rate prices” of the S60 and X60 were intended as sales promotions, intended to increase demand for Tesla’s cars in a year when they were having a hard time making their sales goal.

            What I find surprising isn’t that Tesla is discontinuing that sales promotion soon; what I find surprising is that they didn’t discontinue it at the beginning of the year.

            Perhaps Tesla Inc. wanted to keep the production line humming along as fast as possible, but now that they’re devoting more resources to tooling up for Model 3 production, they no longer need to create additional demand for the MS.

            But that’s just the guess of one two-headed llama who’s merely an interested observer, not an industry insider.

    2. Yes, they will probably axe the 75 next. Bjorn Nyland reports that the first Teslas being launched in Korea in their two stores are all Model S 90s, with X to follow soon.

      They seem to be clearly positioning the S as the high end pricey sports car.

      Once they separate the overlap of these models, the new base price Model S, should be about the price of a maxed-out performance Model 3 with Ludicrous mode: about $85K.

      (Don’t be shocked. Ludicrous mode is one of rare pure profit centers of Tesla. Its designed for the 7% of buyers (says a survey) who have way more money then sense. 🙂

  5. MTN Ranger says:

    I got the email from Tesla the other day. It seems like they are trying hard to get Model 3 reservationists to buy a S 60.

    1. ffbj says:

      That makes sense to me why they would do such a thing. It’s money for them now, not many months away.

  6. Four Electrics says:

    Now both the 60 X and S have met the same fate. Initially, when the 60 X was discontinued, I thought it was due to production constraints.

    Recently, however, Tesla, though their sales forecasts for 1H 2017, has told us that growth for the X and S has stalled. If the market is saturated, it’s detrimental to the bottom line to sell someone a cheaper 60 when they actually would have purchased a 75 or above if the 60 were not available.

    Look for the 75 to increase in price sometime in 2017.

    1. Four Electrics says:

      Another possibility is that the initial Model 3s will be so tricked out they will cost the equivalent of a base the 60 S. That would be bad, but possible.

  7. Chris O says:

    “simplify the order process”? Seems to me the upgradeable S60 was a brilliant ploy to make things simpler for customers who could have their cake and eat it too, buying a car at lower price without burning bridges on range.

    If people typically ended up upgrading as Tesla’s message(sort of) suggests it worked brilliantly for Tesla too.

    Odd….

  8. jm says:

    That lack of notice of discontinuing the X 60D, along with making the air suspension mandatory and eliminating Titanium Silver totally killed my willingness to buy. What was a $85K car overnight became just shy of $100K. I had been patiently sitting with a $5k deposit for over 2 years waiting for the 5 seat and AP2 planets to come into alignment when this happened. And no more unlimited supercharger access. Don’t know how it is where you live but here, I see plenty of 60 S and X Teslas roaming around. It is total BS that they are doing this for a lack of interest. They are doing it to improve cashflow. Every time one of these little “improvements” to the ordering process occurs, it makes it less likely I’ll become a Tesla owner. And that gives me great pain as I’d love to buy a car sourced from Fremont and that has autopilot and self driving. Looks like either a 94 or 120ah i3 will have to be my choice.

    1. Maaz says:

      Lol. Stop complaining and wait until the model 3 comes along that fits your budget.

    2. Jim Whitehead says:

      You sound like a few real estate clients who demanded perfection and whined about the small problems every house has. Don’t like the car color? Repaint it, duh. Don’t like the wheels? Change them.

      Why don’t you seperate your “must haves” from the “wanna haves” in EV. The EV world is changing so fast, you might be happy with a minimal EV like the Ioniq with about 120 miles, projected to cost about $29K US or else wait a year for the Model 3.

      EVs change so fast, whatever you buy will be obsolete in 3 years. Forget perfection; its for angels. What meets your basic needs? EVs today are like Dell PCs were in the 1990s: Obsolete by the time you finally get one delivered. 🙂

      1. James says:

        I’ve been looking at pre-owned Teslas. Naturally, you want the latest Autopilot and AWD if you can swing it. It’s natural to want more but it’s also practical to step back and assess what we actually need.

        In that, I would have to set my priorities as 1)affordability 2)range 3)practicality

        In that, a nice P60 would be grand. But then I start mulling over 190 miles range vs. a 228 mile Bolt EV – being two distinctly different moves, one a FWD tiny people mover, the other a sleek, roomy, RWD sporty sedan. One has a built-in fast charging network, the other has an optional, slower fast charger without the support of a reliable CCS infrastructure. Heck, my used S probably will come with the charging already baked in!

        Now I start mulling over the wants. Sure, I want a newer Model S (less problems – more things ironed out). Then I think of gen 2 seats (look better, better bolstered, last longer). Then Autopilot – does it have it at all, or is it the 2nd generation, with it’s sensor suite and undoubted future-proofing capabilities?…

        But I always come back to affordability. You can note that any Tesla with a P in front has been thrashed, at least somewhat. Not many used Model S are the wife’s car – the one she drove to shopping malls and to grandma’s house. Nope. They have that P which means they’ve been hard accelerated, tromped and abused, at least to some extent. Buy a non P Model S and it’s more likely it’s been driven like a normal car.

        Then you consider a new 60. What does it offer vs. a wait and a smaller, non-hatch Model 3? Hmmm… These are difficult decisions and we all have to weigh them out.

        To say the older model is is “obsolete” is more than a stretch. C’mon – they’re quick, fast, sleek sedans made in America that don’t use a drop of gasoline and have a well-built-out long distance fast charging infrastructure that goes with the car. Those gasser or plug-in wannabes from the Europeans, Japanese and S Koreans can’t even come close to a used S.

  9. Mike Colvin says:

    “Any 60 kWh Model S will have the ability to upgrade their battery to 75 kWh via an over the air update.”

    Wonder if this applies to my 2013 Model S 60? 😉

  10. Kdawg says:

    I wonder if say 10 years from now, when the Gigafactory is cranking out cells at a good rate, if Tesla will offer battery packs to all Tesla owners. So whatever you bought in the past 15 years, you could put a brand new 120kWh pack (or whatever) into your Tesla for $X.

  11. Koenigsegg says:

    60kW are Bum Tesla’s

  12. Jason says:

    Tesla, and all EV manufacturers, are going to have a tough problem on their hands in future years, indeed right now. Over the past 10yrs the price of batteries has supposedly decreased, or the amount of power has increased, so where are these savings in the Tesla offerings? Tesla increased in price by $2k recently, it should have decreased in price. If the 75kWh version drops to the same price as the 60kWh, then that makes sense. Our if the Model S has significantly bigger batteries, that would also make sense.

    Model 3 is going to really highlight this. Let’s say the model 3 has 50kWh, it is only $35k, so that makes the >$68k 75kWh Model S look ridiculous, it is not that much bigger car and doesn’t come with all the bells and whistles as standard. Sure this will provoke lots of emotional responses, but if you look at it logically then something has to give with new battery tech availability.

    Put it another way, supposedly the battery is about a 1/3 the cost, so 60kWh battery is something like $20k. If Barry prices have dropped even 25%, then it is like $15k, so why hasn’t the price of the 60kWh Model S dropped at least $5k? Tesla is a great car, but it is a bit of a rip off.

    Nissan has an easier job, provided it’s next Leaf is about $35k, because you are seeing a vehicle for a similar cost to the original 24kWh, but hopefully with a really bigger battery, which is what you expect if battery costs have improved as has been reported. And indeed the Leaf prices have dropped significantly, which would be expected as battery prices improve.

    As to ordering complexity, that is rubbish. Every single person assesses and decides on hundreds of factors every single time. Dozens of manufacturers, each manufacturer has dozens of vehicles, each vehicle has dozens of options/features. First you decide what type of vehicle you want, then test all the manufacturers to see which one you like, then work out the best options and negotiate a price, or fit the options in with the price you are willing to pay. People ain’t stupid!

  13. Bob Nan says:

    The 90 KWh and 100 KWh Models have only the D (Dual Motor AWD) version.

    Only the 75 KWh offers both regular and D versions.

    Soon they may remove the regular version and offer just the D because it provides an extra 10 mile range for just $5,000 extra with all wheel drive in addition.

  14. James says:

    Jason, how is Model S a “rip off” when it’s a car unrivaled in all the world? I personally appreciate that it’s build in the USA by American workers. This is good all around for our economy and as a matter of pride.

    Everything is getting more expensive, including healthcare and wage increases. My city has imposed a $15 minimum wage for fast food workers. Imagine taking the kids to McDonald’s and laying out $50 for a couple burgers and fries! It’s here! Now!

    So costs of things do go up. Inflation is a part of modern life. If a new Model S price is burdensome, go buy a slightly used one ( see my post above ).

    Comparing a bird in hand with one in the bush is also nonsense. 400,000 preorders in front of those who haven’t preordered. With Tesla’s past record of meeting deadlines, I’d say we’ll be waiting a pret-ty long time for our new M3.

    Having a nice 60D in the garage right now would be amazing. It’s a larger car with a hatchback. Anyone who has owned a hatch vs. a sedan with a trunk knows how much of an advantage that is right there. Add the larger frunk and a larger resale value, and this “rip off” starts making more sense to more people.

    If you’re set on a $35,000 MSRP, you will be waiting a good long time. Musk admits the mean price paid for M3 will be $42,000, I’d say it’s more like $50,000. This takes M3 right out of the grasp of those willing or able to pay $30-40,000 for a 200 mile EV.

    A nice used 60kwh MS seems a better and better option all the time!

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