Tesla CEO Elon Musk Joins President-Elect Trump’s Advisory Council

4 months ago by Eric Loveday 106

Elon Musk Part Of Trump's Advisory Council

Elon Musk Part Of Trump’s Advisory Council

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team has just announced that three notable CEOs will be added the Trump’s advisory council (referred to as the Strategic and Policy Forum).

Among those CEOs is Elon Musk (CEO of Tesla Motors and chairman/CEO of SpaceX). The inclusion of Musk is notable due to the fact the Tesla’s CEO has shown a public dislike for Trump. His inclusion is more likely due to his tie with SpaceX rather than for his connection to Tesla.

President Electric Trump

President Elect Trump

The other notable CEOs are Uber Technologies CEO and co-founder Travis Kalanick and PepsiCo Chairman and CEO Indra Nooyi.

This announcement comes ahead of the planned meeting between Trump and top execs from some of the U.S.’ most prominent companies. Elon Musk is expected to attend the meeting.

Press release from Trump’s team posted below:

President-Elect Donald J. Trump Announces Travis Kalanick of Uber, Elon Musk of SpaceX and Tesla, and Indra Nooyi of PepsiCo to Join President’s Strategic and Policy Forum ………

(New York, NY) – President-elect Donald J. Trump today announced that three additional members will join the President’s Strategic and Policy Forum: Travis Kalanick, CEO and Co-founder of Uber Technologies; Elon Musk, Chairman and CEO of SpaceX and Tesla; and Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of PepsiCo.

Earlier this month, President-elect Trump established the President’s Strategic and Policy Forum and announced an initial round of 16 members. The Forum, which is composed of some of America’s most highly respected and successful business leaders, will be called upon to meet with the President frequently to share their specific experience and knowledge as the President implements his economic agenda. The Forum will be chaired by Stephen A. Schwarzman, Chairman, CEO, and Co-Founder of Blackstone.

“America has the most innovative and vibrant companies in the world, and the pioneering CEOs joining this Forum today are at the top of their fields,” said President-elect Trump. “My Administration is going to work together with the private sector to improve the business climate and make it attractive for firms to create new jobs across the United States from Silicon Valley to the heartland.”

Members of the Forum will be charged with providing their individual views to the President — informed by their unique vantage points in the private sector — on how government policy impacts economic growth, job creation and productivity. The Forum is designed to provide direct input to the President from many of the best and brightest in the business world in a frank, non-bureaucratic and non-partisan manner.

Tesla's Elon Musk joins President-Elect's advisory team

Tesla’s Elon Musk joins President-Elect’s advisory team

With today’s announcement of three additional members, the individuals on the Forum now include:

Stephen A. Schwarzman (Forum Chairman), Chairman, CEO, and Co-Founder of Blackstone; Paul Atkins, CEO, Patomak Global Partners, LLC, Former Commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission; Mary Barra, Chairman and CEO, General Motors; Toby Cosgrove, CEO, Cleveland Clinic; Jamie Dimon, Chairman and CEO, JPMorgan Chase & Co; Larry Fink, Chairman and CEO, BlackRock; Travis Kalanick, CEO and Co-founder, Uber Technologies; Bob Iger, Chairman and CEO, The Walt Disney Company; Rich Lesser, President and CEO, Boston Consulting Group; Doug McMillon, President and CEO, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.; Jim McNerney, Former Chairman, President, and CEO, Boeing; Elon Musk, Chairman and CEO, SpaceX and Tesla Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of PepsiCo; Adebayo “Bayo” Ogunlesi, Chairman and Managing Partner, Global Infrastructure Partners; Ginni Rometty, Chairman, President, and CEO, IBM; Kevin Warsh, Shepard Family Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Economics, Hoover Institute, Former Member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System; Mark Weinberger, Global Chairman and CEO, EY; Jack Welch, Former Chairman and CEO, General Electric; Daniel Yergin, Pulitzer Prize-winner, Vice Chairman of IHS Markit;

Background on the Additional Members of the Forum Announced Today

Travis Kalanick, CEO and Co-Founder Uber Technologies. Travis Kalanick is a serial entrepreneur and the CEO and co-founder of Uber. A Los Angeles native, he learned to code in middle school and studied engineering at UCLA. When he was still a student, Travis founded Scour, the first peer-to-peer search engine. He went on to start Red Swoosh, which was acquired by Akamai Technologies in 2007. In 2008 Travis and Garrett Camp dreamt of being able to get a ride at the push of a button on their smartphones. They soon made that dream a reality when they launched Uber, a global ridesharing service that has revolutionized the way people move, work and live in more than 450 cities and 80 countries around the world.

Elon Musk, Chairman and CEO, SpaceX and Tesla. Elon Musk co-founded Tesla Motors in 2003. As Chairman and CEO of that company, he oversees Tesla’s product strategy — including the design, engineering and manufacturing of more and more affordable electric vehicles for mainstream consumers. Mr. Musk also serves as Chairman and CEO of SpaceX, which he founded in 2002 to revolutionize space technology. SpaceX designs, manufactures and launches advanced rockets and spacecraft. Prior to Tesla and SpaceX, Mr. Musk started the Internet companies Zip2 and PayPal. Mr. Musk received a B.A. in physics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO, PepsiCo. Indra Nooyi is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of PepsiCo. PepsiCo’s main businesses include Quaker, Tropicana, Gatorade, Frito-Lay and Pepsi-Cola. With more than $63 billion in annual net revenue, and more than $35 billion in the United States alone, PepsiCo makes hundreds of enjoyable foods and beverages that are loved throughout the world. PepsiCo is the largest Food and Beverage Company in the US, with approximately 110,000 employees and 100 manufacturing plants across the country. Its employees are based in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. She holds a B.S. from Madras Christian College, an M.B.A. from the Indian Institute of Management in Calcutta and an M.P.P.M. from Yale University.

Source: Reuters

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107 responses to "Tesla CEO Elon Musk Joins President-Elect Trump’s Advisory Council"

  1. Marco says:

    President-electric?

    1. brian f says:

      Hahaha I noticed that too… I’m assuming it was autocorrect/autocomplete since they write the word electric so much, the system just assumed 🙂

    2. Eric Loveday says:

      Does have a nice ring to it…Fixed.

  2. WadeTyhon says:

    I don’t expect Trump to necessarily listen to anything they have to say.

    But having representation from two CEOs of the top Plug In sellers in the US (Mary Barra and Elon Musk) is very good news. 😀

    1. Assaf says:

      Top 2 plug-in *makers*, not sellers 🙂

      Otherwise, agree with what you say:

      – The composition of this advisory council is pretty much the only not-horrible appointment to come out of Trump recently

      – Which makes one worry whether the intent is to gain PR while ignoring advice – or better yet, given the rather heterogeneous POV mix in that council, to say “well half say this and half say the opposite”, and then proceed to do whatever the F he wanted to do anyway.

      1. WadeTyhon says:

        🙂 *makers*

        So far I agree with you about Trump’s appointments. They are in general quite horrible. Some are less horrible than others. Our current governor of Texas makes Rick Perry look like a moderate. So I can think of worse people than him in there.

        I’m not concerned as much about the future of EVs under the administration. But I do worry for the EPA’s effectiveness going forward.

    2. R.S says:

      How many full size trucks and SUVs does GM produce and how many plug ins?

      With all respect I have for her work in the EV field. I’d still bet, that if it comes to choosing which side Berra is on, she will oppose stricter emissions legislation.

      1. Mister G says:

        Correctomundo but having Musk on board is a positive sign towards EV transition.

      2. WadeTyhon says:

        Certainly GM still makes a lot of trucks and SUVs. Americans in general still demand larger vehicles. It’s unfortunate.

        Change takes time for a large company such as GM. Mary Barra has been CEO for about 2 years.

        During that time a new Volt, and Prius-level-efficient Malibu hybrid were launched. Spark EV was expanded to multiple states and produced in higher quantities. The Bolt and CT6 plug-in are imminent.

        They have also begun the transition to all renewable energy. This will take time, but the factory in my area in Arlington, TX was the most recent one to start this transition to entirely wind energy.

        Concerning her business interests, GM has already has enough ZEV credits to last for years if they just continued to produce the Volt. Chevy intends to make a profit on these cars and to start selling credits to other automakers similarly to what Tesla does.

        The last thing I will mention that is mostly related to oil not GM specifically. Even though the oil industry is no friend of any of us… CNG is beginning to displace coal in a lot of states.

        More electric cars means more electricity usage which means more CNG.

        http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=25392

        CNG is definitely no wind, hydro or solar energy. But it’s better than coal.

        In the interim (when we are stuck with a president who believes climate change is a hoax) oil producers in the US don’t necessarily have any reason to fight or kill the EV transition. I expect a slowing/stagnation at the very worst.

        1. Bill Howland says:

          I’m going to avoid the obvious disagreements and just mention Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) usually ONLY refers to Trucks and cars powered by 3000 PSIG (Pounds per Square Inch – Gauge) in Europe and 3600 PSIG in the states.
          Central Station Electricity Methane powered units are supplied by pipelines that may run at several hundred pounds pressure, but in no way are they considered “CNG”.

          The elevated pressure in the supply piping is merely to get the volume of product to the plants with reasonable sizing. The 3600 PSI much higher pressure is used to give the vehicle in question decent range between fillups.

          In vehicles the high pressure is needed soley for compact storage, as the carburated engine can run at household pressures (1/4 PSIG – 7 inch water column) as is done with many Natural Gas automatic emergency household generators.

          Large distance or large vehicles are often LNG (Liquified Natural Gas), seeing as the product heat content is more compact, and a large ‘continual fuel use’ vehicle can efficiently make use of the incidental boil-off.

          1. WadeTyhon says:

            Got it, thank you for the detailed explanation on the difference. Very much appreciated. 🙂

    3. leafowner says:

      Seriously though – one of Trump’s major promises is to get the US Energy Independent and that will be real hard with a bunch of gas and diesel eating machines out there. Part of his plan has to be the conversion to electric which comes almost all from the US and to reduce oil consumption which much still comes from outside (Canada and Mexico are still outside….)

    4. jimijonjack says:

      Don’t Count on Mary BARRA for any EV support , If anything She will try to snuff 0ut EV’s & promote Ice …The Bolt Is a NO CHOICE Compliance Car “FOR CARBON CREDITS ONLY” These Phony Ice Making EV Pretend car lovers have their obvious Agenda To Push forward with “ICE” …They are NOW trying to say That the Exhaust Emissions from ICE cars “ACTUALLY HELP THE ATMOSPHERE” They Genuinely Believe that we are F00lish enough to BUY that.

    5. AC says:

      no one seems to have been writing about the real connection the 2 have tho. lol. elon musk dob? tesla dob? trump? trumps uncle? lol. am sure its all coincidence tho yh. hahaha

  3. John Hansen says:

    Trump has demonstrated multiple times since his election that he is able to forgive and forget. Examples are considering Romney for Secretary of State, getting along with Russia (seriously, that’s a good thing folks), and now this. It’s the mature thing to do, it’s good for business, and now it’s good for our country. Fantastic!

    1. pjwood1 says:

      When even the Wall Street Journal gets drippy with sympathy, for fleeing Aleppo civilians under Russian assisted seige, I don’t know where “that’s a good thing” could possibly come from. Russian press is likening the move to defeating Hitler.
      http://www.wsj.com/articles/evacuation-of-aleppo-delayed-1481707378

      I side with Republicans, saying “Russia is not our friend”. To forgive and forget them, is appeasement. Lucrative appeasement.

      1. John Hansen says:

        You’re eating up our government’s rationale for war, just like they want you to. Just like the run-up to the Gulf war(s).

        But let’s entertain this thought for a moment. What if Russia really is a naughty nation that ought to be put into its place? Why should we be involved? First of all, most of us don’t understand what is actually happening over there, and in many historical cases it has turned out the the US isn’t as blameless as we originally thought. Secondly, why shouldn’t this be handled by other countries in the Middle East, or bordering the Middle East? Every time we have injected our military in the Middle East, it has always bred more resentment than favor. This is not our fight and nothing good can come from fighting it.

        Staying out of other peoples’ wars isn’t appeasement, it’s common sense. And Democrats used to be in favor of that. What changed?

        1. Otto Sayas says:

          Our addiction to oil?

          1. RM says:

            Trump, for all his stupid environmental beliefs, will actually get us off foreign oil and on the road to energy independence, even at the temporary waste of firing up coal and building oil pipelines.

            And, if you believe, as we all likely do, that eventually solar and EVs will rule the day simple based on economics, then Trump’s policies can be viewed are a temporary effort to accelerate our departure from Middle Eastern oil.

            And, maybe, just maybe Elon can convince him that EVs really are the future. There was a rumor that Trump once owned a Tesla Roadster..

        2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

          John Hansen said:

          “Staying out of other peoples’ wars isn’t appeasement, it’s common sense.”

          I entirely agree that we ought to run, not walk, away from any direct involvement in the Syrian civil war.

          “When your enemy is in the process of destroying himself, stay out of his way.” — Sun Tzu, The Art of War

          Syria has been the most persistent opponent to the U.S. in the Arab League. Anything that weakens Syria is good for the U.S.’s political aims in the Mideast. So if they want to destroy themselves, then by all means we should stay out of it. The idea that we should get involved with yet another Mideastern — if you’ll pardon the politically incorrect term — tar baby, is one of the stupidest things that anyone has ever suggested the U.S. should do.

          But sensibly staying out of Syria doesn’t in any way excuse the Trumpians being appeasers over Russia’s meddling in a U.S. Presidential election, nor is it in any way an excuse for how Trump has been talking about weakening our alliances with NATO countries, and also with Japan and other long-term, stalwart U.S. allies.

          A single Presidential administration can do serious and long-lasting damage to alliances which have served the USA very well for decades. Unfortunately, I think we’re going to see exactly that happen.

        3. super390 says:

          I’m not worried about Syria. I’m worried about Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Poland.

    2. Scott Franco says:

      +1

    3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      John Hansen said:

      “getting along with Russia (seriously, that’s a good thing folks)”

      If “getting along with Russia” means ignoring how they’ve interfered in the recent Presidential election, and if it means weakening our NATO alliance, as Trump has been talking about doing, then that’s not merely a bad thing: it’s appeasement right up there with Neville Chamberlain proclaiming “Peace in our time!” with the Third Reich.

      And yet, Trumpians are falling all over themselves in being apologists for Russia’s crimes and military aggressions. That’s not only cowardly and despicable; in my opinion it’s outright treason. “Treason” is a word we don’t hear used much these days. Maybe it’s a word that needs to re-enter the American political category, where it fits.

      Even more importantly, this appeasement will only embolden Putin and Russia to take further aggressions and manipulate internal U.S. politics even more than they already are. That is going to have a long-term effect which will linger even after the Trumpian administration is long gone.

      1. John Hansen says:

        Oh my, now wanting to get along with another major world power is both treasonous and akin to supporting Hitler. Think about that for a moment. That is a very clear sign that the government and media is beating on the war drums and preparing the population for conflict.

        On to your specifics though. How has Russia influenced the elections? I tried finding that info, but the best I could find was that they may have leaked incriminating emails from Hillary (which would previously have been considered journalism), and that they may have hired people to post anti-Hillary messages on there internet (aka Trolling). Is there something else?

        On to Nato, Trump’s remarks about Nato weren’t even in relation to Russia. He was saying that the European countries should actually start participating in Nato defenses instead of the US footing the entire bill. Seems pretty rational to me. Maybe we can use the money we save for something like healthcare?

        So no, refusing to help push us to war with a nuclear power who hasn’t done anything significant to us is not cowardly, Hitleresque, or treasonous. It is peaceful, progressive, and pragmatic.

        1. super390 says:

          Because:
          a. it’s a lie. The Eastern European countries, poor as they are, pay what they can for their militaries because they still fear Russia.
          b. the purpose of a political alliance, which is what NATO is, is for stronger nations to prop up weaker nations against an enemy. The US built NATO so that the USSR couldn’t pick off European countries one after another without massive retaliation.

          Now either that is valid and we shouldn’t be threatening to kick out countries that are NATO’s reason for existence, or it is not valid and the US should leave NATO entirely.

          What is truly evil is for Putin to have NATO members trapped under an America that might abandon them in the middle of a crisis while they are too paralyzed to act on their own. Under that uncertainty, Putin can then strongarm the Eastern states to cut their ties to the West and become satellites. If Trump were to do the honest thing and abandon NATO right now, then Germany and France could build up a pan-European nuclear arsenal big enough to deter a Russian attack without Washington’s approval. But that has consequences too.

          1. John Hansen says:

            Both of your points are objectively false.

            To your point A, a handful of the Eastern European countries may actually pay their way, but most of the rich countries in Europe do not. A quick check indicates that only 5 of 28 countries do.

            To your point B, from Nato’s own website, “NATO’s essential purpose is to safeguard the freedom and security of its members through political and military means.” You literally just made up that part about rich nations defending poor nations. Also, even if that made up part were true, then why don’t all the other rich members of NATO need to contribute their share? Europe’s GDP is actually about the same as the US GDP, so they should contribute just as much.

            Why is this even a debate? Why do you think that the US should foot the bill for Europe’s defense? They are rich, they have a generally better standard of living, free health care, etc, yet we’re spending money defending them. Heck, I say that since we defended them for the past 50 years, they should pick up the tab for defending US for the next 50. We could get free national healthcare, free education, and free housing for every American if they did for us what we’ve done for them!

    4. MDEV says:

      Nice to forgive Putin for the genocide in Aleppo. Great guy sure.

      1. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ sven says:

        And lets not forget to forgive Putin for the genocide in eastern Ukraine, including that commercial airliner from the Netherlands shot down by a Russian BUK surface-to-air missile shot from a mobile Russian missile launcher.

        It’s been a while, but lets also not forget to forgive Putin for the genocide Russia commited in the siege and destruction of Grozny during the second Chechen war.

        Hey, appeaser-in-chief Obama forgave Fidel Castro for torturing, imprisoning, and killing thousands of political dissidents in Cuba when he ended the U.S. embargo against Cuba. Good old Fidel died happy, knowing that he’d won, since Obama lifted the embargo without winning any concessions from Cuba with regards to its treatment of political dissidents or even the release of any political prisoners, some of whom have been rotting in jail/hell-holes for decades.

        1. Bill Howland says:

          I’m quite surprized you said that: there is little intelligence regarding GeoPolitical events here on these pages – I suppose there isn’t supposed to be – but it isn’t a Civil War in Syria – its a destablizing by the “West”.

          “WE” are trying to do the same thing to Syria that “we” do to anyone who won’t play ball. Assad not letting a pipeline go through his country from Saudi Arabia for instance, saying that would be a strategic disadvantage for his allied country, Russia, and Russian Gazprom.

          The Malaysian airliner was indeed downed by “Russian Equipment”, but this was after the Coup d’Etat in February 2014, arranged by asst Secretary of State Victoria Nuland; She admitting it cost over $2 billion over the years to accomplish this.

          Its not so difficult to see what is going on here, since every time “WE” invade a country the first thing we do is:
          1). Set up a Central Bank
          2). “Liberate” the country’s Gold Bars.

          Libya under Kadafee, Syria, Iran, Iraq, Russia, and totally different countries like Cuba were HATED and most were attacked by the United States and others since we couldn’t get them under our thumb. When Kadafee acquiesced and surrendered, he was brutally murdered. This merely shows the rest of them what ‘we’ do to countries that even try to accomodate us.

          As far as ‘Russia controlling all the voting in the US’, it has now come out it was disgruntled Democrats over the way Sanders was treated that caused the info to be released to WikiLeaks.

          All this concern about who did what with WikiLeaks should have been a secondary concern, and not ignore the prime import of the info in the first place.

          It doesn’t matter that all the ‘intelligence’ said Russia was to blame. Sadam Hussein had Collin Powell’s stamp of approval of “WMD” also. We murdered over a million people over a LIE.

          When really, he became our ENEMY after he decided to trade oil in Euros rather than $USD.

          I also find it curious that, since Trump has won, other countries apparently think this true apparent man of peace, will get along with them. The Phillippine’s Duterte threated to throw out US Troops – but he now seems to say its ok as long as Trump is the president.

          More and more countries are getting to the point where they don’t like “our” bullying.

  4. Kim Conrad Jorgensen says:

    Interesting, can’t wait to see what happens next.

  5. pjwood1 says:

    Bannon wanted Romney to come to Trump, to keep up appearances. Ivanka wanted Gore to come, to help her product image.

    I was almost more hopeful Musk wouldn’t go, looking forward to some juicy, antagonizing, tweets. But I agree his business interests (SpaceX/NASA) basically mean he can’t “not go”.

  6. James says:

    What a joke. I understand Musk jumping in to save his businesses, but it must be humiliating to kowtow to an authoritarian buffoon. As he attempts to dismantle environmental protections, I can only hope people like Musk are able through sheer force of will and influence to hold back the barbarians.

  7. cmina says:

    I don’t understand how Musk can make time for this shit in the near future, and not only.

    I call all this nothing else than a distraction. Can’t wait for it to be over and for the pussy grabber to move on to the next batch of billionaire invitees.

  8. CDAVIS says:

    Like or hate Trump, get used to the idea that the Trump Administration will be Pro-EV.

    1. Otto Sayas says:

      Pro-EV? Upon what do you base that assertion?

    2. Anon says:

      Nothing Pro-EV from Trump exists to support your statement. In fact– his pro-fossil fuel statements STRONGLY suggest otherwise.

      Careful chuggin’ that Alt-Right KoolAide. (Tm)

    3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      CDAVIS SAID:

      “…the Trump Administration will be Pro-EV.”

      Are you on drugs? And no, that’s not a joke.

      1. Bill Howland says:

        Trump owns what is considered to be, an American Made Electric Car. Do you? No you don’t. So stop insulting people and filling up these pages with your fairy tales. It would be much more interesting if you had any facts to bring to the table other than just biased conjecture.

  9. Josh Bryant says:

    What is that saying about where to keep your friends and enemies?

    1. Anon says:

      But what if EVERYONE is your enemy, and EVERYYHING is a threat? No rational decisions are likely…

  10. AlphaEdge says:

    The best news to come out of the meeting.

    Elon stands for Trump’s main message, which is American manufacturing.

    1. AlphaEdge says:

      Also, both the Republicans, and the commie-democrats, have betrayed America. NAFTA is a joke. A free trade agreement should not be designed to move American jobs to the country next door, where the product is shipped back into the US. That’s outrageous! It counter productive on so many levels.

      Any plants built in Mexico by American manufacturers, should only be built to supply the Mexican market. Or a deal, similar to what the US has with Canada, where production is shared, with Canadian production, representing it’s share of the market.

      All those here, who care about the environment. Compare Mexico environmental laws with the US.

      Both Trump and Elon are businessmen, and so it should make a good partnership.

      It refreshing to finally have a president that cares about American jobs. Killary the baby killer Clinton and the commie-democrats care more about gay marriage, gender issues, and killing as many babies as possible with Planned Parenthood, one of her biggest supporters than they do about American jobs. Not surprising, as this is the party that supported slavery in America. It was Abraham Lincoln of the Republicans that got rid of it, after years of fighting the democrats!

      The Clinton Foundation is the biggest influence peddling scam the US has seen in a long time. If Trump had that going, he would have been crucified. She gets a pass, as long as she continues to promote the mainstream media pet causes.

      All these talk about the EPA and green cars, and yet nothing is done about the bunker oil burned on the high seas. A problem that dwarfs anything the EPA can do, and yet everyone is so worried about what the EPA is going to do under Trump. Talk about missing the picture. Clueless about environmentalism.

      1. ffbj says:

        Rant much? It is rather scary though that people actually think this way. Not sure I would qualify it as thinking merely parroting extreme right-wing views. So sad.

        1. AlphaEdge says:

          Millions of us think this way. It’s why he won the election. Killary, and the mainstream media refuse to accept that.

          The end of the day, would you rather be unemployed or employed?

          Food on the table earned by your hard work is more dignified, than paid for by a social welfare check.

          1. cmina says:

            “Dignified” enough ?

            1. AlphaEdge says:

              Fair enough. That was funny.

              America has lost textile manufacturing a hundred years ago, and you can’t compare high end manufacturing, the jobs that Trump is trying to save to textile manufacturing.

          2. TomArt says:

            As ffbj said, it is frightening that there are people that think this way. This kind of nonsense that you are parroting is a grotesque evasion of reality.

          3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

            AlphaEdge ranted:

            “Millions of us think this way. It’s why he won the election.”

            That’s entirely true; the phenomenon of people actually believing fake news, such as all the B.S. you’ve posted here, certainly was an important factor in persuading a shocking number of people to vote for someone who is wholly and obviously unfit for office.

            The saying “My mind is made up, don’t confuse me with the facts” …isn’t a joke anymore.

          4. TomArt says:

            Sad that you blame liberals for what Walmart actually does.

            Walmart’s low pay for their workforce costs the Federal Gov’t billions of $$ every year because their employees qualify for food stamps, subsidized housing, free or reduced school lunch fees, school breakfasts, not to mention the need for the ACA to begin with (Obamacare).

            Liberals do not want to see people on welfare. It is there as a safety net – for when you need it, not to live on indefinitely. Fortunately, over 90% of all US households that receive welfare are not on welfare for more than 3 years, on average. So, the system is serving its function, with recipients’ dignity intact.

            However, raising the minimum wage would reduce the need for those services by 10s of billions of dollars per year and simultaneously increase consumption, thus increasing economic activity. It then puts upward pressure on pay for those with positions that are better than minimum wage jobs.

            Prosperity does not trickle down; western civilizations dropped feudalism centuries ago.

            1. Mister G says:

              BINGO

            2. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ sven says:

              FYI, Musk believes that in the future robots will take our jobs, and government will have to pay people universal welfare.

              Elon said:
              “There is a pretty good chance we end up with a universal basic income [aka welfare], or something like that, due to automation.”

              http://www.cnbc.com/2016/11/04/elon-musk-robots-will-take-your-jobs-government-will-have-to-pay-your-wage.html

      2. Eletruk says:

        Trump SAYS he is pro American jobs, but every action he takes proves it is yet another lie to appease the masses. He sells products in the U.S. made overseas, he hires overseas workers for American jobs instead of Americans, and he buys supplies from overseas for his buildings in America. How is any of that caring about American workers?

      3. GeorgeS says:

        Alpha,
        I quit reading right after commi democrats. Cool it with the name calling. I read the wsj and had to listen to rude comments for the last 8 years. Geesh youd think you conservatives would calm down now that trump won but for some reason the insults and name calling seem to just get worse.

        1. AlphaEdge says:

          It’s OK to refer to Trump as a Nazi, or Alt-Right racist, or as Hitler?

          So me your complaints against that?

          1. AlphaEdge says:

            So, should be “Show”.

          2. TomArt says:

            The difference is that those names referring to Trump are, in fact, reasonable, based on what he has actually said, based on who voted for him, and based on his Cabinet appointments.

            1. AlphaEdge says:

              > “The difference is that those names referring to Trump are, in fact, reasonable”

              LOL! Yeah right. Commie!

      4. Nate says:

        I don’t think calling people “commies” is going to get you anywhere, mostly because anyone who uses it now usually uses it as a scapegoat name-calling argument. Also it’s not hard to see that we as a people are capable of fighting bunker fuel and bringing the rise of EVs at the same time. We don’t have to concentrate on one thing at a time.

        1. AlphaEdge says:

          The left-wingers have been doing it for quite awhile now. So much so, that Trump had to disavow the KKK, and the Nazi’s. That’s absurd.

          You been complaining about that also?

          If par of the course, as Reagan himself had to put out a statement to disavow the KKK!

          1. AlphaEdge says:

            “If par of the course”, should be “It’s par for the course”.

          2. TomArt says:

            Uh…disavowing the KKK (who do, in fact, support him) is “absurd”? Am I reading that correctly?

            1. AlphaEdge says:

              They supported Reagan also!

              Both Trump and Reagan have no control over those idiots.

              1. ffbj says:

                True enough, they certainly are idiots.

              2. super390 says:

                The KKK also endorsed Barry Goldwater. Seems to be a pattern.

                Maybe its members understand that the Republicans’ endless whining about how America was better in the past can only be an endorsement for the restoration of White supremacy. There is no other American past.

                Because only a fool would believe that White supremacy wasn’t the cornerstone of American culture and identity. The very concept of a “White” race or “Black” race did not exist in law until colonial Virginia faced a crisis of rebellious indentured servants in the 1670s, suffering under the demands of the capitalist investors who bankrolled the colonies. Before that, amazingly, African captives brought to Virginia were legally treated like the Irish and Scottish indentured servants, meaning they could win their freedom in a reasonable time. The brilliant solution was to give the European servants instant freedom – but demote the Blacks to eternal slavery. Thus the racial labels were invented.

                To put it bluntly, America began as the Stanford Prison Experiment. The “guards” remade themselves mentally to justify their sadistic power over the “prisoners.”

                All Southern culture and ideology was rebooted in that instant as the freed Whites took to their role as henchmen and slave-whippers with relish. The KKK and Jim Crow were the last major recognition of that. But Southern culture is also a cornerstone of American culture. Whites in the North mostly believed about Blacks what Southerners told them.

                I would argue that the creation of the White race was also the creation of American identity, distinct from England. So North or South, “American” was meant to be a White monopoly from the start. And we cannot overthrow that without condemning our ancestors and Founding Fathers and the racist society they served. But if we don’t condemn them then what’s to stop us from going back to White supremacy?

                The KKK is just recognizing that reality, free of the codenames used by other conservatives. That’s why White supremacists never go away. In fact, the Republican Party has adopted more and more of their positions in the last 40 years in its quest to turn back our clock. What practical difference is there between David Duke and Steve Bannon?

          3. Spider-Dan says:

            Yeah, Trump disavowed the KKK… right after he pretended not to know who David Duke is and refused to disavow him.

            Later, after his message was successfully received by its target audience, he then went back and said that of course he disavows David Duke. The transcript is unclear as to whether he literally winked and nodded while saying it.

        2. AlphaEdge says:

          Of course I support EV’s, and if Trump does not support it, that’s a valid criticism. EV’s is important to America’s jobs, security, self-reliance, etc.

          1. AlphaEdge says:

            And cleaner air of course!

      5. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        AlphaEdge ranted:

        “…the commie-democrats…”

        Well, I guess everyone who’s not a fan of Rush Limbaugh or Breitbart Fake News can stop reading right there.

        McCarthyism has returned to America. 🙁

        1. AlphaEdge says:

          Breitbart is the best!

          1. super390 says:

            Breitbart.com believes global warming is a lie. Trump has stated that it is a Chinese hoax.

            But those positions are part of a general ideology that says capitalism is incapable of environmental harm. So if you are a true conservative, you can’t believe that there is any such thing as an air quality problem. And every major conservative candidate pledges that he will eliminate the EPA, which actually does something directly about air quality while EVs are only as helpful as the market-driven power plants that feed them. Of course, in power those candidates simply put the EPA under the control of men who got rich through pollution, which they claim poses no harm.

        2. ffbj says:

          It never left entirely. The whole philosophy espoused by the alternative right, or whatever term the brown shirts want to apply to themselves, is like driving through Iowa in the middle of Winter. It’s Bleak!

          1. AlphaEdge says:

            > “or whatever term the brown shirts want to apply to themselves”

            Where are the complaints against this? You left-wingers are so sensitive about the word commie, but it’s OK to make Nazi references about conservatives?

            1. TomArt says:

              Agreed, it’s not ideal…though, to be clear, “brownshirts” is referring to Trump supporters, not conservatives in general – people who lap up his continued insistence on silencing dissent and scapegoating minorities.

              1. TomArt says:

                Not to mention supporting the belligerent patriotism, which is also being used as a weapon to further both aims – any dissent is considered un-American, and anyone not white is also un-American and needs to go back to where they came from.

            2. super390 says:

              Yes, and we expect conservatives to whine about it, so we can point out that the Nazis were first and foremost an anti-equality movement dedicated to saving “Western” civilization and the capitalist class from Godless Communists. How? By requiring free markets to favor “real” citizens over minorities. By creating a cult of blind patriotism and worship of the soldier. By using unproductive military spending as an alternative to redistribution. By worshiping a fake past of “purity” when “our kind” could do whatever they wanted to inferiors, up to elimination. By mythologizing male supremacy, and pushing women back into being baby machines to raise birthrates to defend against the Mud Races who “breed like rats” (like the Christian “Quiverfull” movement in modern America).

              If any of this is sounding familiar to you, good.

          2. TomArt says:

            Exactly. It never ceases to amaze me how easily people can be persuaded to not only vote against their own best interest, but also to put themselves over others.

            1. AlphaEdge says:

              And the commie-democrats, would export every American job out of this country, and bring in more millions of illegals. You don’t see that undermining what America stands for?
              You just proving yourself to be a communist.

              1. ffbj says:

                What does America stand for? For one:
                “Give us your tired your poor your huddled masses yearning to breathe free. I lift my lamp besides the golden door.”

            2. ffbj says:

              You have to create an enemy for them to hate collectively and then manipulate that hatred to support your cause since you are going to rectify the situation. People are naturally inclined to mob mentality, and politicians know how to utilize that to their own benefit.

              Thus we arrive at a situation, as you suggest, where the individual subsumes their own personal view into the greater whole which might actually not be in their best interest.

      6. super390 says:

        “Commies” are behind NAFTA? Bullshit. Outsourcing and driving down wages are the HEART of capitalism. Free Enterprise means the freedom to chase profits by whatever means necessary. Any restrictions you place on that ruthless pursuit are a step away from capitalism, no matter your political agenda. In that case, why not my agenda instead of a White supremacist’s?

    2. Anon says:

      Elon’s main message is ensuring humanity continues to exist under as favorable a circumstance as possible– despite the self-destructive historical choices of our species. Manufacturing is merely a necessary evil to reach other goals in alignment with that primary objective.

      Trump sees things in narrow terms of “Business Deals”, lives in “The Now”, and is blind to Deep Time (long term consequences of actions or policies).

      1. TomArt says:

        Those are probably the main reasons that Musk agreed to join, though I’m sure his immediate concerns will be damage control, hoping to keep Tesla alive in all of its’ businesses: transportation, solar and storage, as well as to keep SpaceX in good graces with the gov’t for future contracts and collaborative missions.

  11. Priusmaniac says:

    I think it is better to have Elon in to at least try to influence in the good way. Some will find it bad but what if he was not even there? I don’t think it is business interest but genuine desire to orient for the best. If you don’t give it a shot you sure lose, just like not trying to land a rocket.

    1. WadeTyhon says:

      Yes I agree, having a seat at the table is important even if he cannot have a position of power and even when he may strongly disagree with the president and his administration.

      If you remove yourself from the equation entirely then there is no hope of finding common ground and your voice will never be heard.

  12. ffbj says:

    Undoubtedly Trump was stung by the criticism that his original council contained only old line industry executives so to placate the critics he included a few technologists.

    He lambasted others in the campaign for being in the pocket of Goldman Sachs and then appoints Menuchen of GS, what a hypocrite. The guy has gone off the reservation.

  13. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    Well, this is a hopeful sign! As they say, “It’s an ill wind that blows no good.”

    Even if Musk’s appointment here has everything to do with SpaceX and little if anything to do with Tesla Motors, still this seems to be a positive sign that the Trumpians don’t plan to go after Tesla Motors specifically. But that doesn’t in any way alter the fact that the Trumpians, as a group, are still very pro-Big-Oil. An Exxon CEO as U.S. Secretary of State? Ummm… *shudder*

    That apocryphal ancient Chinese curse “May you live in interesting times” …well, they’re here! 🙁

    1. GeorgeS says:

      Agreed pmpu. This is a good thing. Ive decided to try and give trump a break for a while.

      The dems had their way for 8 years. Now its the pubs turn. Thats the way the world goes round.

      1. TomArt says:

        Actually, the Dems didn’t have their way. The House pitched an 8-year tantrum that made any real progress impossible. We didn’t get a New Deal 2.0 that we desperately needed (and still do!), nor did we get a medical benefits plan that kept all the loopholes closed ($10k deductibles?!?), nor did we get Federally mandated paid sick leave nor paid maternity/paternity leave, nor a meaningful increase in the minimum wage.

  14. Phaedrus says:

    This “advisory council” is a clear sign to me that the US is openly becoming a fascist state. Scrolling trough the list of CEO’s, there are those of corporations who have proven to have very nasty plans with humanity. Fascism is described as the merging of large corporations and government. So here it is… fasten your seatbelts. Just my humble opinion.

    1. Anon says:

      I’m expecting open, rampant corruption the likes of which, will make the infamous scandals of Ancient Rome– look like grade school pranks.

      1. ffbj says:

        Maybe we could send Trump a fiddle.

        1. TomArt says:

          I’m sure he can find a cheap, lead-laced model from China at Walmart…

          …the Walmart CEO being on that list is chilling…so, they are going to help create US jobs, huh? I can’t wait to work for minimum wage and collect food stamps, can you?!?

          1. ffbj says:

            I say fiddle you say faddle. Always nice to read your insightful comments.

            I think of it as new Robber Barons, ala J.P Morgan, J.J. Hill, those guys from the so called “Gilded Age.” It was for some while many worked in sweat shops, lived in slums, or labored in farming. These were celebrated men who though they were destroying the environments they gifted themselves with through governmental agencies, and treated their workers like slaves, were seen as giants of capitalism.

            So now we are embarking on that same boat, with a guy at the helm who has never been sailing and bought his captain’s hat at Neiman Marcus.
            I see rough weather ahead.

  15. floydboy says:

    Well, Musk has already gotten further than Obama was able to with these people! I hope he can have SOME influence.

  16. Nelson says:

    Good news. Now maybe Barra and Musk can discuss charging infrastructure partnering without interference from middle management.

    NPNS! SBF!
    Volt#671

    1. WadeTyhon says:

      Haha this almost certainly won’t happen, but there is nothing in the world I want to hear more than this! XD

  17. Trollnonymous says:

    This gunna be one hellofa roller coaster ride….

    1. TomArt says:

      …yep.

  18. Mark C says:

    Maybe a side benefit will be that Tesla can quit fighting individual states to sell direct.

    The Federal Government has the leverage to make a great deal of things happen, even when the state is opposed to the idea.

  19. Heisibrghi says:

    Oh how I wish that my children grow up in a world that allows them to categorize themselves into more than 2 categories.

    I herewith declare that I am a gay nazi communist. (I hope that everyone here understands what 😉 means )

    1. ffbj says:

      Sure, there is a bit of the gay, nazi, communist, in all of us.

  20. Get Real says:

    Absolutely Trump is a wannabe dictator (just look at who he has praised, (Putin, Bashar al-Assad, Saddam Hussein, Kim Jon Un!!!).

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/controversial-dictators-leaders-donald-trump-praised/story?id=40373481

    Also, look at his methods that he apparently borrows from other psychopath strongmen like Hitler:

    1. Using very angry, hysterical and emotionally loaded demagogic appeals to his target audience which he learned from a long study of Hitler’s speeches.

    http://www.alternet.org/election-2016/donald-trump-getting-his-cues-hitler-how-gop-leader-following-fuhrers-recipe

    http://www.politicususa.com/2015/12/13/donald-trump-sounds-acts-adolf-hitler-running-fuhrer.html

    Which leads to,
    2. Blaming, scapegoating, and bullying in a most racist way non-majority peoples for supposedly weakening or selling out the country and race.

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/10/politics/countries-that-jail-opposition-second-presidential-debate/

    http://www.vox.com/identities/2016/10/20/13319366/donald-trump-racism-bigotry-children-bullying-muslim-mexican-black-immigrant

    3.Repeatedly threatening and bullying your perceived enemies and rivals with retribution and threats against basic rights like the First Amendment (which is a key element of the Bill of Rights/Constitution), attacks against which are hallmarks of dictatorships:

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/10/politics/countries-that-jail-opposition-second-presidential-debate/

    And their are many other frightening parallels to this turn to hard-right and facts/truth doesn’t matter propaganda-driven rabble rousing.

    And of course a true sign of this rapidly growing proto-fascism is the willingness of bitter and angry old white males like Alphaedge and many others to ignore or celebrate the warning signs as they throw democracy under the bus.

  21. JohnMB says:

    Sure, sure, he’ll have to tow the line or he’ll get FIRED!

  22. Benjamin says:

    Most likely Elon Musk was asked to be an advisor not because of climate change or fossil fuel issues but for job creation within the US. Remember all Teslas are assembled in USA and will soon be making batteries here, too. So not so much because suddenly Trump administration is open to climate change and environmental causes BUT purely on the basis of job creation in the USA.

  23. Open-Mind says:

    The misinformed right hate Musk.

    The misinformed left hate Trump.

    No difference.

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