Successful Buyer Of Better Place Looks To Sell Off Remaining Cars

4 years ago by Jay Cole 7

NIS 80.000 ($22 USD) Sounds Like A Steal For A New-Used Renault Fluence ZE (provided it is not damaged)

NIS 80.000 ($22 USD) Sounds Like A Steal For A New-Used Renault Fluence ZE (provided it is not damaged)

After a winning bid by Sunrise Ltd to buy the assets of Better place failed due to lack of funding, a second suitor – Success Assets, stepped in to purchased the failed battery swap station provider.  Well, hopefully these guys pay anyway.

(Update:  October 10th, 2013 – they didn’t)

Access To Better Place Swap Stations Is Not Included In The Price Of The Discounted Fluence ZEs

Access To Better Place Swap Stations Is Not Included In The Price Of The Discounted Fluence ZEs

Now comes word from Haaretz that Success is looking to sell off the remaining Renault Fluence ZE cars that Better Place still had in inventory and failed to get through customs before going bankrupt.

The cars are actually still sitting in two locations; some at Ashdod Port (Israel) and some outside of Renault’s factory in Turkey.  Despite Better Place owning the electric Renaults, the cars have been left idle in some cases for over a year.

Success Assets is asking NIS 80,000 a piece for the cars, which does not include any kind of charging deal and/or infrastructure that Better Place had originally looked to package with all the cars.

The Fluence ZE Comes Standard With A 3.5 kW Charger.  There Is Also An Available Upgrade To The Zoe's Chameleon Charger (43 kW)

The Fluence ZE Comes Standard With A 3.5 kW Charger. There Is Also An Available Upgrade To The Zoe’s Chameleon Charger (43 kW)

NIS 80,000 works out to about $22,500 USD, which is a significant discount to what Better Place originally looked for in selling the car (NIS 123,000 – $34,600 USD) BEFORE adding on the monthly charges which started at around NIS 1,090 ($307 USD/month).

The Fluence ZE is available in France from €21,300 or $28,300 USD (post  €5,000 rebate) with a battery rental of €82 ($109 USD), so the car which has a 22 kWh battery and a NEDC range rating of 115 miles (which translates to about 70-75 in the US on the EPA system) is a pretty good value.

The only problem is the cars have been basically neglected for a very long time, and may (or may not) be in good working order “due to the lengthy period they have been out in the open.”  Because bankrupt Better Place needs to reinstate its importer’s license, these cars will be titled to Better Place then resold as used.

Haaretz (sub)

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7 responses to "Successful Buyer Of Better Place Looks To Sell Off Remaining Cars"

  1. Schmeltz says:

    What a mess. It’s a shame for those cars…these look nicer than the Leaf imho.

    Jay are the current people who subscribed, still renting/leasing their cars, or did they have to return them when the company went bankrupt?

    1. Assaf says:

      The cars are just an electrified version of a plain-vanilla Renault sedan.

      My own personal “vanity” preference is: if I already get an EV – let the world know by making it look unique 🙂

      Seriously, it is an important part of advocacy.

      As to current drivers, since they bought the car (and leased the battery), they still have it – some 1000 of them. They are a bit stranded, but I think part of the purchase deal has been to agree to operate a subset of the battery-swap stations.

      One huge detriment to both existing and would-be owners, is that trickle charging is forbidden thanks to the monopolistic regulations that Better Place extracted from the Israeli government. So customers will have to look for a L2 charger, or have one installed at home, probably at far higher prices than in America.

  2. Spec says:

    What I would really want to know is will the Better Place accounting software be removed such that it works like a regular EV?

  3. kdawg says:

    Anyone else find it ironic the company is called “Success Assets”

    1. Sevie says:

      What’s their abbreviation? Suc. A$$.?

    2. Assaf says:

      He’s just a parking-lot and real-estate shark. He can recognize a good deal when he sees it, and he’s likely to recuperate his $3m one way or another.