Steve Jurvetson On Tesla Motors – Video Interview

2 years ago by Electric CarsTV 11

Steve Jurvetson Interview

Steve Jurvetson Interview

Venture capitalist, Tesla board member, Tesla insider, owner of the first Model S and the second Model X, Steve Jurvetson was recently interviewed by Bloomberg.

Much of the interview focuses on topics unrelated to Tesla (full interview here), but EVANNEX – provider of aftermark Tesla accessories, nicely cut down the video (seen above) to show only the Tesla-related discussion.

Video description:

“Steve Jurvetson discusses Tesla Motors on Bloomberg’s “Studio 1.0”

Jurvetson is one of those interviewees who is actually entertaining and informative. He seems candid and willing to discuss most any topic.

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11 responses to "Steve Jurvetson On Tesla Motors – Video Interview"

  1. ModernMarvelFan says:

    Sorry, there is no way a $35K Model S would be close to a $18K Civic in total ownership cost with today gas price and electricity cost…

    Unless government kicks in $13K in incentives….

    1. Stimpacker says:

      Haha, my $18K 2001 Honda Civic sure had a much higher total cost of ownership than my GM cars.

      Terrible suspension, terrible brakes, terrible dealer. Tons of stories but I’ll save it. Wife kept getting in trouble with that car. She switched to a $22K 2005 Pontiac G6 and was happy and trouble-free.

      So it is possible a good BEV can actually cost less to own than a crummy ICE.

      1. ModernMarvelFan says:

        That is the case for any unreliable car vs. a very reliable car.

        But according to Consumer Report, Honda is certainly more reliable than Tesla on average.

      2. Eric says:

        “…my $18K 2001 Honda Civic sure had a much higher total cost of ownership than my GM cars… Wife kept getting in trouble with that car. She switched to a $22K 2005 Pontiac G6 and was happy and trouble-free.”

        Umm… you know Pontiac is GM, right?

    2. Grendal says:

      Current gas prices will not hold. I would love to see gas prices reflect actual cost instead of the artificially low price they do reflect.

    3. DaveBr says:

      A $35K Tesla could cost less – overall – than a $18K Civic if you factor in the reduced maintenance issues with an EV. EV’s have way way fewer moving parts, require no oil changes, filters, hoses or belts. They don’t have complex transmissions or exhaust systems. They use brakes at a slower rate because of regenerative braking.

      Cars with combustion engines have hundreds of tiny moving parts, complex and expensive transmissions and exhaust systems and require a lot of $$ to keep running.

      I used to work at a car dealership and they only sold new cars to generate customers for their service center. The owner literally told me that 85-95% of their profit was not from selling new cars but fixing old ones.

      1. ModernMarvelFan says:

        “A $35K Tesla could cost less – overall – than a $18K Civic if you factor in the reduced maintenance issues with an EV. EV’s have way way fewer moving parts, require no oil changes, filters, hoses or belts. They don’t have complex transmissions or exhaust systems.”

        And $17K price difference still won’t cover all that stuff you said. Most of what you said only matters after about 100K miles, not before. Oil change is about the only thing that is constant on the Civic. Civic comes with CVTs now which is about as simple as one speed gear box.

        “They use brakes at a slower rate because of regenerative braking.

        Brake Pads only needs changing every 80K miles for about $399… Still long way to go to cover that $17K difference.

        “Cars with combustion engines have hundreds of tiny moving parts, complex and expensive transmissions and exhaust systems and require a lot of $$ to keep running.”

        They are also designed to running just fine as well. Can you show me the math that it would add up to $17K in cost difference?

        Most modern ICE powertrains don’t need much service in the first 100K miles. Oil change, engine air filters, coolant flushes and maybe 1 fuel filter change are the only thing you need on ICE related services.

        Accessory belts are usually only $30 to $40 and you only need a new one about every 100K miles which can be changed by just about anyone within 5 minutes. Most cars come with diagrams in the engine bay for that.

        If you add up all that service before 100K miles (not broken things, but just services), it is well under $3k to $4K at most.

        Even with gas at $3/gallon, 100K miles with 30mpg is only $10K for 100K miles. add them together, it is still way less than $17K price difference.

        Now, EVs with 100K miles, even at 4 miles/kWh and $0.10/kWh would still cost $2500 in electricity alone.

        Low gas price is the biggest thread to potential EV buyers who buy it for cost reason alone..

        1. DaveBrave says:

          If you stop counting at 100,000 miles your not getting the full picture. I would argue that the life span of a car should be at least 200,000 miles. If you take that into account the repairs from the second 100,000 miles would add up pretty quick.

          Maybe a Civic is a bad example because the Tesla will probably be a nicer car anyway. The current Model S is as nice as any gas powered car in its price class. So it stands to reason that the Model 3 would be as nice as any gas powered car for $35,000.

          So maybe a better thing to say would be that a similar priced EV would be cheaper overall compaired to its gas powered counter part.

  2. ModernMarvelFan says:

    Also, I don’t remember anyone has changed a muffler in recent history with modern cars where most of them are stainless now.

    In California, new cars don’t need smog for the first 4 years also.

    So, there are a bit of exaggeration in some of his so called “cost analysis”.

    1. Djoni says:

      Witch capital Venture dont?

      1. kdawg says:

        Name your sorcerer.