Sportier BMW i3 S To Go On Sale Next Year

4 months ago by Eric Loveday 36

What we believe to be the new 2018 BMW i3 S out testing last week in Germany

BMWBLOG is reporting, via internal sources, that next year the German automaker will launch a sportier version of the BMW i3.

BMW i3

This sporty variant will likely be called the BMW i3 S. As BMWBLOG explains:

“An independent source told BMWBLOG that the i3 S will be shown before the end of the year with sales projected for 2018. While not confirmed for every world market, the expectations are that new model will be sold alongside the “standard i3.”

The i3 S will be a proper hot hatch, according to the report. We expect to see a HP boost of some 10 to 15 over the current i3 (168 HP) and an increase in torque too (184 pound-feet currently).

Some minor styling tweaks are expected as well, and these changes should carry across the entire i3 lineup. BMWBLOG adds:

“The i3 range as a whole will get minor styling tweaks, but aside from adjustments to the car’s bumpers and possible changes to the headlights, the car’s overall look will remain largely unchanged. The i3 S – compared to the i3 facelift – is rumored to offer a slightly beefier body, a lower ride height and wider tires.”

Some changes within are expected too.

The refreshed i3s should debut at the Frankfurt Auto Show in September or at the LA Auto Show in November before going on sale sometime next year.

Source: BMWBLOG

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36 responses to "Sportier BMW i3 S To Go On Sale Next Year"

  1. DJ says:

    Here is to hoping the “changes within” mean they are getting rid of the dog fur lined interior.

    1. CLIVE says:

      Let me guess you do not own a dog

      Its fiber not dog ?

    2. franky_b says:

      Don’t let you love for hard plasty blind you

      1. franky_b says:

        plastic

  2. unlucky says:

    The car doesn’t need a lower ride height. It needs a better ride. It already has a lousy ride in the rear seats.

    It’s baffling BMW can’t make a better suspension on this car, they do an amazing job with other cars, even ones which are sportier than this.

    And yes, I don’t care if pet hair is a renewable natural fiber, please get rid of it.

    1. Evz3 says:

      My test Drive in an i3 felt like a smooth magic carpet drive. Drove to the BMW site in a Z3, anything probably is smooth compared to a Z3. Anyhow, the i3 suspension was great and worked wonders even with the narrow tires.

    2. Warren says:

      I used to think the i3 was so harsh, in comparison to my LEAF. The LEAF was cushy. My Focus is also heavier and smoother on the freeway too. But the feedback and responsiveness in the i3 is heads and shoulders above the others, as has been noted in comparison tests. You see, even with the narrow tires and limited grip, the way the i3 responds to your smallest steering inputs is a very sporty and entertaining experience. After living with the other cars, they just start to feel “sloppy” compared to the i3 with its immediate responsiveness. So after living with more conventional cars, the i3 will grow on you, and will most likely be your preferred ride.

      Also please realize the door panels are not fur lined plastic. They are made from plant fibers. It might be good for you to review the innovative construction process of the i3 in this short video to see how well thought out the i3 design process is.

      1. unlucky says:

        It rides worse and handles worse than an M3. There is no need for this to be the case. They have shown an ability to have a good ride on other cars with sportier suspensions. The i3 has no excuse for being this bad when it isn’t an average handler at best. Heck, I’ve got a Cadillac with the sports suspension that blows the i3 away in handling and also rides far better.

        No, I won’t grow to love a choppy suspension such as the i3 has. Instead BMW will grow to make a better ride or else remain in the same “city car” bucket that the current i3 and LEAF also are in.

        I am aware what kanaf actually is, thanks. Hence my reference to “renewable natural fiber” (as pet hair also is). No matter where it comes from it still sucks, BMW’s marketing doesn’t change the day-to-day with the stuff. They want to give you junk and then expect you should love it because of its source. I don’t. I’m not impressed by a backstory as to why the interior is that silly. So indulge me with my little “pet hair” comment, okay?

        1. franky_b says:

          it’s okay, we get it, you prefer hard plastic that turn grey. No need to get so fancy about it.

          Yes the ride can be choppy, but I had a sport car before and it compares.

          The choppiness as more to do with the length of the car then the suspension. So in bad roads (like we tend to have here in Montreal), it can be annoying sometimes. But then again, it’s the case with pretty much any car in Montreal in these conditions.

          But I prefer the i3 the way it is then having a car that feel numb and unresponsive.

          1. unlucky says:

            The i3 is hard plastic that is grey. The kanaf is grey.

            The ride is choppy, I have a sport car right now and it doesn’t compare. A Cayman S (which isn’t what I have) rides far better and handles better.

            I agree the length of the car (really wheelbase) is what causes the porpoising. It’s not the whole of the problem, but the short wheelbase and high vehicle height means you are pitched forward and back more as the wheels go over bumps. But the issue is BMW hasn’t fixed it. It’s difficult to fix, certainly. But if BMW can make a car with a full sports suspension like an M3 ride well they can make this ride well. They just need to hunker down and do it. The LEAF and Bolt are both better despite similar shapes and wheelbases. BMW can do better and without giving up the drivability.

            Race cars with even the most taut suspensions (think Le Mans prototypes or F1 cars) can drive over the red and white kerbing at the end of the track now and use that to their advantage. That kerbing was put there to prevent cars doing that but the suspension engineers overcame it. That is how much advance we see in suspension over the last 10+ years. BMW just isn’t applying enough effort into improving the i3 suspension. And it’s not excusable.

            1. franky_b says:

              you are funny… Have you seen hard plastic aged? It gets scratch easily, it greys/washout out unevenly.

              Yes the Kanaf is grey, but it doesn’t show scratch, it doesn’t discolour and it is warm to the touch.

              You prefer hard plastic, your choice. Not mine.

              I had a 370Z (and a 350Z before), wheels size where about the same size. Suspension was about has firm as the i3, the wheel based was a little bit longer. I drove the Volt Gen 1 and the Cadillac ELR. They both felt “heavy” in the way the i3 seem more nimble and dynamic.

              I have a 2014, but from comments here and else where, the 2017 being a little heavier and reduce some of the things you love to complain about.

              Breath a little, it’s not your car, you prefer to drive boats, go get a Tesla S, it’s the perfect boat for you, it’s big, heavy, low, has more range. You will even get enough hard plastic to make you happy.

              1. unlucky says:

                Yes, I’ve seen hard plastic aged. I’ve owned cars for many years. Haven’t had a problem with my dashboard getting scratched.

                kanaf is not “warm to the touch”. Fibers don’t violate the laws of thermodynamics.

                There’s no hard plastic to prefer or not prefer. The kanaf is hard plastic also. It’s hard plastic with stuff glued to it. It’s a different form of the old “mouse fur” trick. Not impressive.

                I haven’t been able to sit in the back of a 2017 i3, moving or otherwise.

                You can keep your “breathe a little” comment. You’re posting here too, don’t try to put on airs.

                I didn’t say I prefer driving boats. Why are you making stuff up? I said I have a sporty car right now. Again, what I’m saying isn’t that I like to drive boats, it’s that there there is no reason a car has to ride poorly to be a non-boat. A Cayman S rides better than i3. Is a Cayman S a boat?

                I hear you about the 350Z/370Z ride, I’ve ridden in both. Both aren’t nearly as choppy as the i3 but they are not all that refined either. It’s amazing how buzzy the 350Z is (and was on day 1), it’s clear where Nissan puts their money in that car and it isn’t in expensive suspension or sound deadening.

                1. franky_b says:

                  Cold is cold, but some material conduct it more then others (like wood vs granite). Same here, yes it’s the same law of thermodynamic that applies, thanks for bringing it up.

                  Kenaf isn’t “glued”, you need to check a few videos

                  https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bmw+i3+production

                  Like any car, the i3 could use some work on suspension, but you go to the extreme and say it’s not drive-able. When I tell you BMW did some improvement, your only answer is, I didn’t drive, so I don’t believe you. That’s the extend of your knowledge.

  3. Seth says:

    Can we get 4 normal doors and more space in the boot please 🙂

    A bit of a mundane thing, but I’d reckon it would make the car better. The interior I have no gripes with, I liked what I saw. It’s something different over plastics, that’s not neccesarily a bad thing.

    1. Rich says:

      +1
      In addition, I would add 2x the electric range and AWD.
      They have an “i5” coming sometime in the year 2075, but they hacked the rear cargo by putting a dramatic slop on it. It looks like a hatchback with the height raised.

      1. Warren says:

        You are right. I would love for the S to be dual motor with incredible acceleration. BMW could do it, but sadly I doubt the will. This is too long to wait for the S model. My Focus is due back in June. Maybe I will see if they can extend my lease by another 6 months. The i3 is an awesome car, and I am convinced that I will be getting a second one after consideration of all the competing models.

    2. no comment says:

      i think the insertion of “normal” doors would require a complete redesign and extending the length of the car. to me, it looks like the rear door is much too small to turn into a door that is hinged on the front side.

  4. Jelloslug says:

    I liked my i3. I did autocrossing at the BMW performance center with it and it was a blast. I would not own it out of warranty thought….

    1. CLIVE says:

      As long as you do not buy the REx I see no reason other than battery advancements not to keep it.

  5. William L says:

    BMW put their focus on wrong place again. Go search for all i3 forums, I haven’t heard any owner wants more power, current i3 is speedy enough for what its intended to do.

    One the other hand, the new sportier i3 probably is achievable by software with new larger battery, so doesn’t cost BMW much, but can milk few thousands from new buyers.

    1. franky_b says:

      Your assumption is there won’t be a bump up in the range.

      Along with those rumours (because that’s what they are), there is also a bump up on the range.

    2. Dan says:

      Exactly. If I wanted to spend my weekends clocking my 0-60 times in a straight line, there is already a Tessa that fits the bill. If they could get AWD in there without compromising too much in space, the car is already perfect for its use-case.

  6. Joe says:

    Battery is really too small compared to competition.
    200 miles /300km real range would be a minimum.
    Trunk size is quite small as well which makes it less versatile. It’s really only a secondary car.

    1. CLIVE says:

      Competition? Sure sure sure.

      That 200 mile car is currently only a compliance car ? So check back in 1 year and we’ll see who has the leading ZEV.

      1. franky_b says:

        It’s sold everywhere on the planet… That argument is not only false, it shows how little you know.

        1. CLIVE says:

          In North America it is only just a compliance-car ?.

          Check back in 1 year fanboy.

          1. franky_b says:

            If I’m a fanboy, you are a troll?

            Available and sold in volume in all states in the USA. Compliance car are limited to CARB zone/states. I understand you want to redefine what compliance cars are, but you don’t get to do that. The RAV4 was compliance, the Golf-E, the Merc Class-B as well. not the i3. Because if you classified the i3 as compliance, pretty much all EV sold today are.

            Again, go get your facts straight (it’s the national sport lately in the USA, fake news, versus fabricated facts, versus real facts)

      2. William L says:

        BMW sold 7625 i3 in 2016. GM is planning to sell 30,000 Bolt in 2017. I’m confused, which one is the compliance car.

        1. franky_b says:

          If you give World wide numbers for the Bolts, also give World Wide numbers for the i3.

          And we all know the Bolt should sell more with the added range. So no surprise here. Range isn’t a criteria to define if it’s a compliance car

      3. unlucky says:

        It’s only sold in one place right now where EVs don’t get massive advantage and that’s British Columbia. Maybe that makes it a sort of compliance car.

        But he won’t be correct for more than another couple months.

        Note that the i3 BEV is also currently a compliance car in the US at least. Only the REx is sold outside CARB states. The BEV was sold for a short while in some of the pseudo-CARB states like Texas and Florida but currently isn’t.

        1. franky_b says:

          ” ….sort of compliance…” nope…

          “Only the REX is sold outside CARBS states…” nope

          1. WARREN says:

            You are probably correct that he needs to check his facts once again..

          2. unlucky says:

            Show me a new REx for sale outside a CARB state right now.

            1. unlucky says:

              Sorry, I meant BEV. Show me a new BEV i3 for sale outside CARB states right now.

              1. franky_b says:

                You mean like, now, right now, with proof of sale and all…

                Wait, waiiiit, waiiiittt… I just got a phone call from BMW, nope, they don’t provide localized sales numbers.

                But to your point, it is sold World Wide (that means beyond the USA), it’s all over Europe (even makes top sell charts in some). In New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, etc… etc… etc…

                What about you? Can you prove your statement? I mean, like right now… Can you prove the i3 BEV hasn’t sold at all beyond CARB state?

                May be CARB has nothing to do with someone bying a BEV versus a REX, may be the extend of the charging network has more to do with the choice? May be weather is a more important factor in the decision to go for a BEV or a REX. May be you need to check your facts once again.

            2. Schnort says:

              I bought an i3 BEV in Texas back in 2015.

              Definitely not a CARB state.

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