Sped Up Video Of Tesla Model S Getting Supercharged

3 years ago by Eric Loveday 16

Charging Display - Tesla Model S

Charging Display – Tesla Model S

“Charging from about 10 % to 100 %. Charging site: Gol, Norway. Display shows typical/ideal range. The video was played back 10 times faster.”

States Tesla Model S owner Bjorn Nyland.

The entire 12-minute video focuses on the charging display as the Model S gets Supercharged.

Of interest is the fluctuation in amperage, voltage and charging rate.

Additionally, we get to see how the charge rate tapers down as the Model S battery pack nears full charge.  Actually, the taper begins much earlier than some might expect it to.

Basically, this shows us that Supercharging  quickly gets an empty pack to 50-ish %, but after that the benefit of the Supercharger begins to fade.

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16 responses to "Sped Up Video Of Tesla Model S Getting Supercharged"

  1. Dr. Kenneth Noisewater says:

    Hmm, an older Model S? Looks like it’s not going much past 100kW rate at peak.

    1. yuba says:

      Yes, it seems 100 kW is about the maximum. Has anybody seen some actual evidence that the MS can charge at a faster rate? Tesla is talking about 120 kW (even 130 in Europe)but I have never seen any real evidence of this. Anybody?

      1. kdawg says:

        If you go to the link I posted below, one of the cars was charging over 120kW.

  2. ffbj says:

    Well his first video was Nov 2013, and he has put a few miles on it driving all over Norway, maybe 20k, under less than optimum conditions.

    He, imo, is ingeniously operating a one man deliver service sans fuel cost, by the using the supercharger network. I give him a 6 for inventiveness, an 8 for being opportunistic, and a 9 for perseverance.

    1. Cavaron says:

      The delivery-thing just seems to be a second job/hobby, because he said, he is working at the university of Oslo.

      1. Suprise Cat says:

        And it’s not his own service, he’s driving for nimber (formerly easy bring, renamed due to trademark issues)

        https://www.nimber.com/

  3. Tyl Young says:

    401km=249.17miles

  4. George Parrott says:

    We are still getting 269-273 actual range miles with a full charge after 14,500 miles here in California.

  5. Leafer says:

    The taper point 105a at 390v , that’s peak on a leaf!

    Wish Nissan would add similar display of charge to the leaf.
    We want to see what’s up and how long to full on dcfc

    1. Spec9 says:

      Yeah, I wish all sorts of companies would give out more info. Just make the important stuff in big font and the geeky stuff in small font so the clueless people know what the really need to watch.

  6. kdawg says:

    Too bad this wasn’t real time 🙂
    Then you could fill a Tesla almost as fast as a gas car. No need for the battery swap.

  7. kdawg says:

    It appears the Model S got 150 miles in 30 minutes. This is less than Tesla’s claim of 170 miles in 30 minutes.

    Has anyone made a chart of the amps, range or kWh, voltage for a Tesla charging cycle besides the one on Tesla’s website?

    1. wraithnot says:

      Here is a link to the data I logged from some of my supercharging sessions:

      http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/showthread.php/23180-Finally-120KW-Supercharging!/page21

      Raw data can be found here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ir8nka1o7bfpjti/BZrK9Ej2Xh

  8. I’ll be posting a story with charts within the next couple of weeks.

    Yuba, I travel a lot and routinely get above 100kW at start. It does taper pretty quickly. It’s still the best by far of any charging option, and a big part of what makes the Model S the best cross-country car I’ve ever driven.

    Tesla touts optimistic, best case numbers. The reality is still far better than any other automaker can do.

  9. mustang_sallad says:

    The display shows over 200km/h while charging around 4A @400V, or 1.6kW, which suggests the Model S can travel 200km on 1.6kWh of energy which is absurd. I wonder why they would skew the km/hr number like that, that’s only going to encourage drivers to stay connected longer and occupy the station.