Schaeffler’s Experimental Vehicle Bio-Hybrid Is Tested By Fully Charged – Video

4 months ago by Mark Kane 21

Latest episode of Fully Charged is about special four-wheel assisted-electric bicycle called Bio-Hybrid.

Bio-Hybrid | Fully Charged

Bio-Hybrid | Fully Charged

It’s designed by Schaeffler and offers not only a lot of fun for the last mile travel, but is also an engineering marvel – just check how the roof folds down.

“This is a Fully Charged exclusive! Not something that has ever happened before.

We present the prototype Schaeffler Bio-Hybrid personal transport system. A pedal assist car? A four wheeled bike?

So easy to move along and just enormous fun to drive/ride. Let’s hope they develop this into a fully fledged product.”

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21 responses to "Schaeffler’s Experimental Vehicle Bio-Hybrid Is Tested By Fully Charged – Video"

  1. Kosh says:

    I wouldn’t call that “weather proof”.

    At best it’s a sunshade. But any kind of rain with a slight wind and it’s just coming in sideways. Or you get massive amounts of road splash.

    1. jimjonjack says:

      Looks Like a Shruken down Model T..lol

      1. Anon says:

        Yeah, it’s awesome. 🙂

        Would be great on bike paths…

    2. jimijonjack says:

      You need to add a Cabin shelter like on a Snow Blower & then you would keep out the elements.

    3. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

      In the UK my main cycling weather concerns were:
      – not being hit in the face by rain
      – not covering my back with mud
      – not falling over on slick surfaces (water or ice).

      That covers the main concerns.

  2. jerry says:

    Understand this is not legal on most US roads as legally a car.

    1. Dan says:

      62% of Americans live in cities. “Most US roads” don’t have that many people using them.

    2. Ambulator says:

      I think it’s legal on bike paths, though. I find it quite interesting.

    3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      But it doesn’t need to qualify as a “car” to use most public roads. Bicycles are legal to ride on most public roads, other than limited access highways.

      Whether it’s actually safe for this sort of vehicle to share the roads with vehicles which may run at 60+ MPH, and may weigh as much as a ton or more… that’s another question.

      But freedom means people should be allowed to do things that aren’t safe, so long as they’re educated about the dangers and so long as they don’t endanger others on the roads.

  3. Warren says:

    These tall velomobiles have been around for years…some even commercially available.

    http://insideevs.com/meet-elf-the-1-hp-solar-rechargeable-electric-with-30-miles-of-range-wvideo/

    There is a gal we met at a Bernie talk, two years ago, who drives one.

    1. Warren says:

      She is outnumbered ten to one, around here, by alt-right, coal rolling, monster trucks, these days sporting huge American flags.

  4. DL says:

    That thing reminds me of those three wheel Can-Am “motorcycles”, which have all the WORST features of a motorcycle and all the WORST features of a car, without the BEST features of either.

    This thing has none of the benefits of bicycle, but all of the drawbacks, and none of the benefits of a car, but all of those drawbacks too. It seems relegated to the seaside resort rental market, if it has any commercial purpose at all.

  5. Independant Observer says:

    4-wheel bicycle???

    Unicycle = 1-wheel
    Bicycle = 2-wheel
    Tricycle = 3-wheel
    Quadra-cycle = 4-wheel

    I work with several people that have battery assist bicycles that are very light weight, efficient and Street legal. They use the battery assist when going up hills or against a strong wind.

  6. James says:

    Cute! Don’t see the benefit over an electric bike, though. Plus with a bike you have way better visibility because you can see over most cars. Would rather have a Faraday bike.

    1. Ambulator says:

      I see more cargo capacity and better posture.

    2. William says:

      “Faraday bike” – not to be confused with anything Faraday Future. Faraday makes a nice ebike!

  7. William says:

    It’s a four wheeled “+Stromer-” German engineered type bike. Hope it is at least 48 volt. Range?

  8. Kymberly jackson says:

    I love the idea but one thing you have to keep peddling it’s not like the Electric bike I have where you peddle to get it going then it has a throttle drive I love it why can’t it be mire like that

    1. Tom says:

      Since it has 4 wheels (although different from country to country I’m sure) then there are likely rules about how it is classified. If it is truly self propelled then it would probably be classified as an ‘automobile’ with the rather obvious distinction that auto in automobile means self propelled. Once it is classified as that then there are all manner of regulations to meet. Whereas there are separate distinct rules for self propelled bicycles since most places a self propelled bicycle is just classified as a scooter not a motorcycle and even if a motorcycle then there are less stringent requirements than a 4 wheeled auto. But less than 50 cc motorcycles are scooters and regulated for license, insurance, etc more like bicycles. i.e. you don’t need a motorcycle license to drive an electric bicycle.

      Short version….regulations, taxation, licensing, etc.

  9. I hope Robert Llewellyn can also review the Better Bike PEBL:

    http://www.better.bike/

    It is fully enclosed, has an optional heater, headlights and turn signals, reverse, optional additional batteries, has regen, and is made with sustainable materials.

  10. Peter Garnett says:

    Interesting.

    The electric pedal-assist bikes I’ve seen in the past have been more bicycle-like – heavier than a normal bike but otherwise fitting that form factor, where you could just tie it up to a tree. Legally bicycles, since they had a max speed in line with believable pro cyclists and only amplified your pedal power, rather than being able to just “hit the gas”.

    I used to own one of those (an AeroVironment Charger) and used it very happily for some years before I passed it on on the used market. Main practical issue was forgetting to recharge it, as there was no good charge port next to where the bike was parked – had to cart the heavy lead-acid battery up stairs to my apartment.

    In today’s era of compact lithium ion, I imagine much cool new stuff is coming in this area. Although, again, I’d probably opt for a lighter-weight bike-ish design – something like the Copenhagen Wheel, perhaps.

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