In San Francisco You Can “Cruise Anywhere” In An Autonomous Chevrolet Bolt

13 hours ago by Mark Kane 17

GM’s autonomous driving company – Cruise Automation, is currently testing the all-electric Chevrolet Bolt EV in an autonomous ride sharing application in San Francisco.

Cruise Automation – Chevrolet Bolt EV

The service is available through Cruise Anywhere App, but only for Cruise employees at this point.

The modified Bolt EVs are still required to have a driver on-board, ready to take control at any time, but apparently most of the rides are completed autonomously, without interruption or intervention.

Cruise Anywhere is also available seven days a week, and soon should be expanded by more than 100 Bolts EV.

“Cruise Anywhere is in beta, hence the employee-only restriction, but the company says that some employees are already using it as their primary source of transportation, replacing either personal vehicle ownership, public transit or traditional ride-hailing services completely. In total, Cruise says 10 percent of its SF employees are using the beta, and more are being enrolled each week with a waitlist currently in place.”

“Cruise employees are able to use the Cruise Anywhere services between 16 and 24 hours per day depending on availability of the R&D fleet that Cruise operates in SF”

According to the article Cruise Automation not only develops autonomous driving, but also the ride sharing application itself, in order to be best prepared to offer a stand alone service or car sharing via partners.

source: techcrunch.com

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17 responses to "In San Francisco You Can “Cruise Anywhere” In An Autonomous Chevrolet Bolt"

  1. Mark.ca says:

    Very exited about this! Hopefully it won’t take too long before we see this in their evs. I’m done driving. No video leakers yet?

  2. stimpacker says:

    Not too excited.

    Not production EVs that you can buy. These are $100K specially modified EVs.

    When will GM announce a Chevy Bolt model that is autopilot ready and at what price?

    1. John says:

      My guess…Never.
      They’re trying to figure out how to put cars in the “subscription service” category. It will replace the income they lose from regular maintenance.

      So instead of a $50 oil change every other month, they’ll charge you $25 per month for access to their autonomous network.

      1. ClarksonCote says:

        Exaggerate much?

        Show me any car that needs an oil change every other month and for $50.

        For that matter, my Chevy Volt needs one just every other YEAR.

        Lastly, it’s not hard to find all the press releases that state the Bolt was designed with autonomy in mind, and has all the hooks and handles to support it. These test beds and rideshare offerings are the start of that.

        1. Nick says:

          Good points, but make sure you don’t under change your oil.

          http://clark.com/cars/oil-change/

          1. ModernMarvelFan says:

            Volt isn’t your typical ICE cars implied by that article.

            Owner’s manual requires 1 every 2 years. Often, in 2 years, the Volt oil life display still show above 50% oil life for many owners.

            That is because the engine is so infrequently used and even when it is used, it is used in a “steady state” case where none of that “severe” operation mode applies compared with traditional engine driven car. The electric motors take care of most of the work and smooth out the operation of the ICE if they are used.

            1. Tom says:

              Good point. The oil in most Volts probably degrades due to age before it ever degrades due to use.

          2. zzzzzzzzzz says:

            Synthetic oil is manufacturer requirement I think in most new engines for many years. You don’t change it every 3000-5000 miles like granfathers did in old clunkers. Once a year may be standard recommended change schedule unless you work for Uber.

        2. Stimpacker says:

          @ClarksonCote

          So why do these Bolts look like a well funded university project?

          Despite having a factory install the automation, it still looks not ready not mass production.

          1. unlucky says:

            Because that’s the state of the art in LIDAR packaging.

            Everyone who has an actual self-driving car is dealing with the same issues.

            Tesla isn’t dealing with it because their car isn’t anywhere near self-driving right now.

            It does seem to me it’ll be tough for anyone to sell cars to people with that crud on the roof. We’ll have to see if beliefs change or if the technology changes.

            1. Asak says:

              If the cars are really capable of self driving I bet a lot of people would be willing to tolerate it. No one complained about cars having an antenna.

  3. ffbj says:

    A good place to test it out.

  4. HVACman says:

    I see conventional charger stations in the photo of the Cruise garage but wouldn’t be surprised if Cruise and GM transition to a wireless charging system for the autonomous Bolts so they can return to their Cruise garage or parking lot and auto-charge without requiring anyone to plug them in.

  5. SFresident says:

    I hope they program the cars to NOT double-park when picking up and dropping off passengers… there are enough issues with Uber/Lyft/etc. blocking roads, we don’t need more!

  6. speculawyer says:

    I love how most autonomous driving platforms are done on EV cars. That helps associate EVs with the latest technology. 🙂

    And it makes sense for autonomous cars to be EVs. So much easier & safer to recharge an EV with wireless charging or robotic plug rather than filling with gasoline robotically.

    1. unlucky says:

      Google started all this off with Lexus RX450hs. Hybrids, not even plug-ins.

      But it does seem like it’s more and more EVs now.

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