San Antonio Approves Use of NEVs on Public Roads

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 6

GEM

Family-ish NEV

Should glorified electric golf carts be allowed on public roads?  That’s a question several cities have set out to answer, some say “yes,” while others say “no way.”

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Work Type NEV

Add San Antonia to the list of “yes” sayers.

San Antonio’s Office of Sustainability says residents and visitors there will now be able to legally travel around in environmentally-friendly neighborhood electric vehicles (NEVs).

The NEVs will be restricted to city streets with posted speed limits of 35 miles per hour or less, but most aren’t capable of hitting that 35-mph mark, so they’ll likely cause some congestion if loads of NEVs take to the streets.

Furthermore, drivers of NEVs will be allowed to park in metered spots free of charge.

Though NEVs do meet the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s standards for low-speed vehicles, they aren’t what we’d call safe.

NEVs are more suitable for worksites and off-the-public-road areas (think campus safety at universities or security at shopping mall parking lots), but in San Antonio we’re certain you’ll soon see a decent amount of these golf cart-like machines on public roadways.

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6 responses to "San Antonio Approves Use of NEVs on Public Roads"

  1. Warren says:

    There are already guys souping up NEV’s to do 50 mph. It is pretty simple.

    Safety depends on how much kinetic energy you are trying to dissipate. Kinetic energy is mass times velocity squared. The logical answer for safety, as well as energy consumption, is to limit both mass and speed of all private passenger vehicles. Allowing private vehicles that weigh more than 2.5 times the mass per passenger is not ethically justifiable. Also, since speed is squared in the equation, small reductions have a huge effect. History demonstrates that modern societies can function very well with speeds limited to no more than 55 mph.

    1. Rick says:

      “Allowing private vehicles that weigh more than 2.5 times the mass per passenger is not ethically justifiable.”

      According to whose ethics?

      1. Warren says:

        Your grandchildren’s.

  2. Warren says:

    Congestion is caused as much by the space taken up by vehicles, as their speed.

  3. Anderlan says:

    If I ever buy an NEV I will name it NEV Campbell.

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